Putting An End To Rearing - Page 5
   

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Putting An End To Rearing

This is a discussion on Putting An End To Rearing within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        03-05-2013, 11:22 AM
      #41
    Started
    What has changed in the last few weeks? Ie riding more, riding by self? It sounds like she has learned or is learning that rearing gets her what she wants or she is doing it out of frustration. How high is the mare going? Is she going higher each time? What behavior was the trainer asking the mare to do that was beyond the mare? I just ask not because I think I can fix this, but because I think these questions are germane to the problem.

    I think that selling a horse and dealing with rearing over the internet can be a mess. I think that's true of most behavior problems and general horse skills. The issue with selling a horse that rears is who do you sell it too? I agree hands down it can be the best thing for horse and rider. I also think no horse is worth dying or being incapacitated for. I also think that most riders won't touch a horse that rears with a 10 foot pole. Which means there is really only slaughter as an option. That's a jagged little pill to swallow for many owners. I also don't know that this horse's problem is at the point of being unable to fix with the help of a trainer. Which the OP has mentioned several times that they are working with. We are viewing at best an sliver of the situation and creating a situation of our own making that may or may not be an accurate representation of the facts.
    Shoebox likes this.
         
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        03-05-2013, 12:07 PM
      #42
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shoebox    
    As much as this will sound like one of those immature responses but she's not getting sold unless some majorly hefty circumstances were happening. I don't see any reason that someone who does know how to deal with it (like a trainer, or something) couldn't tell me the best way to go about it instead of immediately "sell your horse." That doesn't ALWAYS have to be the answer. I mean, how does a trainer learn to deal with rearing? By having someone tell them how.

    I guess it really depends on the situation to make an individual decision. In some - maybe even many - situations, yes, a trainer would be best, even selling your animal. Heck, a trainer will ALWAYS be best. "Trainer or sell the horse" should not be the answer for every single person who has a horse that might rear, though. An experienced rider might have the ability to fix it themselves, and just need some pointers on the correct way to do so.

    I'm having a hard time getting across what I'm trying to say here. That's like saying if your dog snaps at you, either hire a dog trainer or sell it. Yes, dog aggression is hard to fix, and it could even be a danger to yourself. But many people fix it on their own. But if they ask the best way to fix it and everybody says "I won't tell you, sell your dog," well, they're going to get hurt trying to fix it the wrong way.

    Maybe that's just me. I'm glad she's a good horse who keeps her feet planted. If you hate the threads offering advice on how to fix it, you shouldn't post about how everyone else is wrong and why, and then not offer something yourself. Even a trainer starts somewhere - if everyone told them to sell the horse or bring it to a pro they wouldn't ever be able to become trainers, then, would they?

    I do see what you're saying. Rearing IS dangerous, and I would highly advise anyone who has a rearer to get professional help. But sometimes they can't, and I see no reason to refuse to help because of that so long as the rider is experienced and knows what he/she's getting into. (And I'm really not trying to come off as an ass here, I promise).

    And onto the topic - OP, have you tried anything? How is it going?
    I have trained a fair number of horses. I offered the ONLY advice I will give for something very dangerous over the internet (to get a professional who knows what they are doing). BTW the OP is doing something like this with his/her apprenticeship.

    That being said, it is YOUR horse, YOUR neck, YOUR brains (or lack.. lol). In spite of advice (which I did NOT give), most people will do what they WANT to do anyway. Not just about horses either. Darwin's theory takes care of it .. sometimes... and when it does not, I hope they recognize their luck!
         
        03-05-2013, 12:19 PM
      #43
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Elana    
    I have trained a fair number of horses. I offered the ONLY advice I will give for something very dangerous over the internet (to get a professional who knows what they are doing). BTW the OP is doing something like this with his/her apprenticeship.

    That being said, it is YOUR horse, YOUR neck, YOUR brains (or lack.. lol). In spite of advice (which I did NOT give), most people will do what they WANT to do anyway. Not just about horses either. Darwin's theory takes care of it .. sometimes... and when it does not, I hope they recognize their luck!
    Mm. For the most part I've taken all advice given to me on this forum. I know that a majority of the people one here know more than I do, and I respect them for that. But I'm glad to know that if someone is trying to fix rearing themselves they are automatically stupid (Or "Lack Brains" as you put it) and that 'Darwin's Theory' should take care of them. Talk about not having any confidence in anybody to the extreme.

    I am aware OP is getting an apprenticeship. I never once said anything about the OP except in my last post to ask how things were going.

    Anyways. Sorry, OP, for getting off topic. I'll stop dragging the post away so you can get the help you need - Let us know when you have an update!
    Critter sitter likes this.
         
        03-05-2013, 12:37 PM
      #44
    Banned
    Hmmm just a thought. I once had a horse start being a dink when he went out on his own and he would start goofing off while out. I did not have the riding skills to really effectively manage this guy, however I did have the ground work skills. What I did was lunge him all the way out into the field, just moving in big circles away from the barn and his buddies. As soon as he acted up I would spank his butt and make him work in a big fast circle until his eye and ear were on me.....then I'd let him relax......he learnt that playing up away from home meant he'd be spanked and worked and if he relaxed I'd let him rest. I did that a couple of times, really just due to the fact that I knew I couldn't ride it out.

    He was a good boy for the most part after that.....perhaps it's an option, she can rear all she wants while your on the ground but she's going to get spanked for it?? IDK???
         
        03-05-2013, 01:03 PM
      #45
    Trained
    If you have a chronic rearer and you tried the usual methods with no success, send the horse to a trainer who knows how to rehabilitate the animal or stop riding it! I could not agree with Elana more! When I was a youth I saw a girl get killed by a chronic rearer who had been to every local trainer, the egg, water balloon, you name it! Obviously none of these trainers had the cure because I witnesses this horse go up and over on this girl, there was about 10 of us going on a trail ride. I still remember the blood coming out of her ears. I used to train for the public and at a stable, any horse that offered to go up high (not a temper pop), I was off, period! Personally if I had a horse whose response was to rear up when asked to do something, I would euth it.
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        03-05-2013, 01:40 PM
      #46
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by waresbear    
    If you have a chronic rearer and you tried the usual methods with no success, send the horse to a trainer who knows how to rehabilitate the animal or stop riding it! I could not agree with Elana more! When I was a youth I saw a girl get killed by a chronic rearer who had been to every local trainer, the egg, water balloon, you name it! Obviously none of these trainers had the cure because I witnesses this horse go up and over on this girl, there was about 10 of us going on a trail ride. I still remember the blood coming out of her ears. I used to train for the public and at a stable, any horse that offered to go up high (not a temper pop), I was off, period! Personally if I had a horse whose response was to rear up when asked to do something, I would euth it.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Yes, this I completely agree with. If you try and can't fix it, if it's over your head, stop trying! I really hope it goes well for OP.
         
        03-05-2013, 02:55 PM
      #47
    Showing
    I have seen horses react even worse when anything touches the poll while it is rearing. I've had horses want to rear but because I know what's about to happen I'm able to diffuse it and I may not be nice about it.
    Elana likes this.
         
        03-05-2013, 03:43 PM
      #48
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shoebox    
    And onto the topic - OP, have you tried anything? How is it going?
    I haven't been riding yet, it snowed again and it's quite deep, but I've had a chance to talk to my farrier and he suggested riding with a crop and swatting her in the head when she goes up. I did put her saddle on and walk her away from the barn for a while, she was much better.
         
        03-05-2013, 03:53 PM
      #49
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rookie    
    what has changed in the last few weeks? Ie riding more, riding by self? It sounds like she has learned or is learning that rearing gets her what she wants or she is doing it out of frustration. How high is the mare going? Is she going higher each time? What behavior was the trainer asking the mare to do that was beyond the mare? I just ask not because I think I can fix this, but because I think these questions are germane to the problem.

    I think that selling a horse and dealing with rearing over the internet can be a mess. I think that's true of most behavior problems and general horse skills. The issue with selling a horse that rears is who do you sell it too? I agree hands down it can be the best thing for horse and rider. I also think no horse is worth dying or being incapacitated for. I also think that most riders won't touch a horse that rears with a 10 foot pole. Which means there is really only slaughter as an option. That's a jagged little pill to swallow for many owners. I also don't know that this horse's problem is at the point of being unable to fix with the help of a trainer. Which the OP has mentioned several times that they are working with. We are viewing at best an sliver of the situation and creating a situation of our own making that may or may not be an accurate representation of the facts.

    The only change I can think of is we are riding on the other side of the barn by ourselves. She isn't going very high (aside from the time I mentioned before when she threw me off.) there's no leg flailing, and she stays about the same height each time she does it. The trainer was asking for a collected trot, canter, lead changes, which she was not familiar with being not even a year off the track at the time.

    And to add on to the option of selling her, for those who have not read other threads I've posted about Nell, I've tried to sell her, multiple times, but there is simply no interest in OTSBs where I am. I am opposed to sending her off to slaughter, especially when I can still financially support her.
         
        03-05-2013, 04:02 PM
      #50
    Weanling
    For the rearing it certainly varies on the horse.

    My first mare I taught to rear on my own (after going to multiple Medieval Times shows, lol), when she offered a rear without a cue I took the reins to both sides of her neck quickly and sharply. Scared her half to death and she never did it off cue again. (This was a no higher than cannon bone rearing horse).

    I had a TB gelding I was training for someone who reared when I took him from his buddies. All I did was push him forward, got his feet moving, he never offered it again.

    The downside to my post... I had a 4 year old that was a chronic rear(er) because a friend of mine thought it was "cute" to teach her to rear from a young age. I tried everything from smacking the crude out of her, getting her feet moving, pulling her to the ground when she reared (with me on her!), etc. Nothing worked. She ended up flipping on me, crushing my ankle and breaking my knee as an end result. I never touched her head to discourage rearing (though I have heard the egg/water balloon trick works) because I was concerned it would make it worse than it already was. I wouldn't be surprised if she was on someone's dinner plate in another country. She disappeared from WV a few years ago.

    Please, please, be careful with rearing. It is a nasty animal.
         

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