question about leading
 
 

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question about leading

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        05-09-2014, 04:29 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    question about leading

    So I feel silly asking but because I've never had this problem I'm a bit stumped... My mare was trained to walk behind the handler on the lead line. I want to do showmanship and I just can't get her to lead with me at her shoulder. She does everything in showmanship but likes to lag behind at the walk. Any tips or tricks? I really feel like I am over thinking things and I know this should be easy but I'm having a brain fart. After a year off I'm still getting back in the game and trying to get my thinking back to horses (just finished training 2 pups). Thanks in advance for answering my silly question.
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        05-09-2014, 05:59 PM
      #2
    Weanling
    Does your mare lunge well?

    Put your mare in your usual lunging setup, whether it be a rope halter with a lunge line attached or otherwise. You don't need a long line for this, only long enough to have the horse trot a circle around you and enough left over line to use the end for forward.

    Walk forward while holding the lead a few feet down the lead rope. You want there to be a nice drape at this point while you're teaching this. You also want to give your horse room to move. As soon as the slack comes out of the lead rope when she lags behind you, quickly turn around and send your horse off in a trot around you. Only ask your horse for a couple circles. You aren't lunging here, just teaching your horse to move forward off of that pressure.

    Then ask her to stop, make sure she's relaxed, then walk off again and repeat the above. I find most horses pick this up very well in a single lesson.

    Pick your stopping point when your horse is coming off that slight pressure when the slack starts to come out. When she's coming off that pressure, don't have her lunge

    Over the next couple sessions you'll refine it more. Instead of having her stay at a nice pace behind you with slack, bring your arm forward a bit. This will start to take the slack out in the same way it did when you sped up. When she starts to come more forward in relation to you, bring your arm back to a neutral position. After she understands to come forward, every time she slips behind you, ask her to come forward again.

    From there you can start to shorten your lead to a more showmanship appropriate length.
         
        05-09-2014, 08:42 PM
      #3
    Yearling
    I used to board and had access to a round pen for lunging. 2 weeks ago I moved her to my property with no round pen. Needless to say our lunging needs work. I'll work on that and then try your advice. Thanks!
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        05-09-2014, 09:14 PM
      #4
    Super Moderator
    Is she lagging behind you, taking all the slack out of the rope and making you drag her forward? Or is she keeping some slack in the rope, and minding a respectful distance? Because if it's the latter, what a shame it would be to train that out of her.
         
        05-10-2014, 04:14 PM
      #5
    Green Broke
    Take lash whip in left hand, trailing behind you, and tell her to come up, and if she doesn't pop behind you, or angle whip and pop her lightly.

    Use 'come up' to differentiate between just lollygagging and needing to be up.

    Would also suggest different lead too, as that would lock in you are doing something different.

    But horses at barn did showmanship and knew to stay correctly beside, and also would lag behind, depending on what was needed.

    So horse can do both equally well.
         
        05-10-2014, 06:06 PM
      #6
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    is she lagging behind you, taking all the slack out of the rope and making you drag her forward? Or is she keeping some slack in the rope, and minding a respectful distance? Because if it's the latter, what a shame it would be to train that out of her.
    This is tough to answer because she leaves it slack but you can still feel the resistance from her. Its hard to describe because the rope is slack and if your not on the lead rope or know what to look for then you might not notice the "energy" she puts off. Its reluctant and laziness. When I got her she wouldn't walk on the line respectfully at all. She was everywhere including on top of you and she never paid any attention to the handler. I quickly stopped this bad habit and one of the thing I did was randomly stop, back up, flap my arms, jump around, etc... It made for one heck of a laugh for those watching the crazy girl with her horse lol needless to say it worked. I can stop, back, and turn on a dime without any direct cues. But now she is leary cause she knows mom could spaz out and she'd accidentally smash her face on an elbow or something lol I'm going to reevaluate the situation because as I'm thinking about this I don't want to confuse her and I do like her out of my space. But I so badly want to do showmanship and she's my only option. Any more advice would be appreciated. Thanks everyone!
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        05-10-2014, 06:22 PM
      #7
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Palomine    
    Take lash whip in left hand, trailing behind you, and tell her to come up, and if she doesn't pop behind you, or angle whip and pop her lightly.

    Use 'come up' to differentiate between just lollygagging and needing to be up.

    Would also suggest different lead too, as that would lock in you are doing something different.

    But horses at barn did showmanship and knew to stay correctly beside, and also would lag behind, depending on what was needed.

    So horse can do both equally well.
    I'd love to have her understand both but I'm wondering if I'm capable of teaching her both without confusing her. I'm by no means a trainer and although I've done well so far I try not to experiment without a trainer. Before I moved her my board came with a trainer to reassure me now I'm not sure if I can afford one for a few months because of the cost of moving her and making our property horse friendly. I'm also overly paranoid because I've watched trainers ruin horses and I don't want to ruin my horse with bad timing or something. I try to be careful not to get in over my head. Maybe some YouTube videos can help me. By no means am I a beginner either. I've trained under the guidance of more than one trainer on multiple horses. This is just my first time flying solo and she wasn't an untouched horse, she was a spoiled disrespectful untouched horse so I'm very hesitant with what I train and how I train. I'd rather take more time than mess up her training. Any and all advice is welcome please and thank you!
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        05-10-2014, 07:22 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    The horse has been incorrectly trained. EASY fix. Lead the horse at it's shoulder, walk the horse along a wall. Carry a whip in the left hand, reach behind your own butt and touch the horse (on the belly/etc) with the whip. It WILL 'walk up'. Halt, restart. The horse can learn this in one day.
         
        05-11-2014, 11:40 AM
      #9
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by equitate    
    The horse has been incorrectly trained. EASY fix. Lead the horse at it's shoulder, walk the horse along a wall. Carry a whip in the left hand, reach behind your own butt and touch the horse (on the belly/etc) with the whip. It WILL 'walk up'. Halt, restart. The horse can learn this in one day.
    That's the thing, she wasn't incorrectly taught. She had respect issues and had to be taught to stay out of the handler's space. I personally like my horses at a respectible distance but I want to do showmanship but my previous training contradicts showmanship. So basically I'm wondering if I can have the best of both worlds. This horse will go right back to being pushy if I'm not careful so that's what's got me worried right now. I don't want to ruin our training.
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        05-11-2014, 01:19 PM
      #10
    Weanling
    The method started will make a horse which leads beside you and will stand for you to walk around as well.
         

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