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Questions about riding?

This is a discussion on Questions about riding? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        02-21-2013, 10:33 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    I don't see why you fired the old farrier for disciplining a horse who kicked him. You should be lucky that horse didn't land him in the hospital.
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        02-21-2013, 10:38 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    If she was the horse for small children, she's probably "bomb proof," which also might make her rather insensitive to leg cues and people hauling on her mouth, unfortunately. She's had very inconsistent cues, so she might be confused. You'll have to make sure you're clear and consistent with your cues, to help her learn. And you'll likely have to be firm with her, though hopefully you can lighten up the cues over time.

    Regarding the overflexing, I wonder if that was a case of you not releasing the pressure when the horse yielded its head (your trainer should have told you about that). Or perhaps the trainer had you do it too much. Also, when you're turning, you should use leg pressure as well (so if you're turning left, cue with your right leg). That should allow them to figure out the difference between flexing and turning.

    Anyway, I agree with smrobs that it would be worth working on lateral flexion and other basics in a snaffle as well. Just make sure that once the horse starts to yield its head, you release the reins immediately. Ask for more over time, but always remember to release the reins. Hopefully you'll be able to lighten up your cues, though it will depend partly on her mouth, I guess.

    I'd also work on leg cues, with the same goal.
         
        02-21-2013, 10:39 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Deschutes    
    You likely are giving him the cue to flex. "Open the barn door" so to speak if you really feel you need to be drastic with your cuing. Otherwise, leg pressure might aid in keeping forward motion.

    Flexing helps to teach horses to give to pressure, rather than fight it, and it helps a lot with getting flexibility into their necks.

    Ever tried doing circles to try and get a horse to bend around your leg? It becomes painful very quick when they don't. Have that flexibility you need.

    But other practical uses are for one reign stops. If a horse won't give its head, you might as well be screwed.

    But some people do tend to over flex, I agree.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    That might be what we have to do for awhile is be more drastic with our cues for him. That makes since now why you would want a horse to know how to flex their neck (our old trainer never really explained why on anything) But this might be a dumb question and I'm sorry but when you say "get a horse to bend around your leg" How I learned to ride when I want to turn right I pull to the right and use pressure from my left leg and same when I want to go left I pull to the left and use pressure form my right leg. When you say bend around your leg do you mean when I want them to do tight circles I should be using my inside leg? Sorry again for the dumb question.
         
        02-21-2013, 10:45 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Deschutes    
    I don't see why you fired the old farrier for disciplining a horse who kicked him. You should be lucky that horse didn't land him in the hospital.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Because my boyfriend was holding my horse and said she didn't really kick she pulled her foot out of his hand. But I don't kick my horses so I don't like anyone else to.
         
        02-21-2013, 10:45 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mistysms    
    But this might be a dumb question and I'm sorry but when you say "get a horse to bend around your leg" How I learned to ride when I want to turn right I pull to the right and use pressure from my left leg and same when I want to go left I pull to the left and use pressure form my right leg. When you say bend around your leg do you mean when I want them to do tight circles I should be using my inside leg? Sorry again for the dumb question.
    Not a dumb question. If you want a very quick turn to the right, you should cue with your left leg, but moving your left leg slightly forward. This will tell the horse to move its front end quickly to the right. And if the horse has shifted its weight to the hind end, you will have a very quick turn.

    However, in other situations you may want the horse to curve its body in a semi-circle as it turns. So, if you were turning right, you would cue with your right leg (not moving it forward at all this time). This would tell the horse to move its ribs away from your leg, and its body would curve.
         
        02-21-2013, 10:53 PM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LisaG    
    If she was the horse for small children, she's probably "bomb proof," which also might make her rather insensitive to leg cues and people hauling on her mouth, unfortunately. She's had very inconsistent cues, so she might be confused. You'll have to make sure you're clear and consistent with your cues, to help her learn. And you'll likely have to be firm with her, though hopefully you can lighten up the cues over time.

    Regarding the overflexing, I wonder if that was a case of you not releasing the pressure when the horse yielded its head (your trainer should have told you about that). Or perhaps the trainer had you do it too much. Also, when you're turning, you should use leg pressure as well (so if you're turning left, cue with your right leg). That should allow them to figure out the difference between flexing and turning.

    Anyway, I agree with smrobs that it would be worth working on lateral flexion and other basics in a snaffle as well. Just make sure that once the horse starts to yield its head, you release the reins immediately. Ask for more over time, but always remember to release the reins. Hopefully you'll be able to lighten up your cues, though it will depend partly on her mouth, I guess.

    I'd also work on leg cues, with the same goal.
    Like I said before I new I would have some problems with her being a trail horse. :( that's one thing that I have been most on top of was always being consistent with the cues. That's what I will do. I will start from the beginning. Should I work on flexing on the ground before I try it in the saddle?
         
        02-21-2013, 10:55 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LisaG    
    Not a dumb question. If you want a very quick turn to the right, you should cue with your left leg, but moving your left leg slightly forward. This will tell the horse to move its front end quickly to the right. And if the horse has shifted its weight to the hind end, you will have a very quick turn.

    However, in other situations you may want the horse to curve its body in a semi-circle as it turns. So, if you were turning right, you would cue with your right leg (not moving it forward at all this time). This would tell the horse to move its ribs away from your leg, and its body would curve.
    OK thank you so much for making that more clear to me!
         
        02-21-2013, 11:01 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mistysms    
    Like I said before I new I would have some problems with her being a trail horse. :( that's one thing that I have been most on top of was always being consistent with the cues. That's what I will do. I will start from the beginning. Should I work on flexing on the ground before I try it in the saddle?
    Yes, you can. That's what I do when starting horses.

    But it sounds like she's very, very, VERY quiet, so there's no real risk to starting from the saddle. You can also do some flexing from the ground with a halter.

    If her mouth is really hard, I wonder if you'd be better off using a bosal/hackamore. There are a few hackamore threads on here, if you're interested in that route.
         
        02-21-2013, 11:06 PM
      #19
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LisaG    
    Yes, you can. That's what I do when starting horses.

    But it sounds like she's very, very, VERY quiet, so there's no real risk to starting from the saddle. You can also do some flexing from the ground with a halter.

    If her mouth is really hard, I wonder if you'd be better off using a bosal/hackamore. There are a few hackamore threads on here, if you're interested in that route.
    I'm going to ask this now even tho I haven't done it with her yet. When I do start teaching her how to flex on the ground (or in saddle I guess) when I pull her head around to flex I almost know she is going to move to the side or back up. Should I just stay with her tell she gives me her head?
         
        02-21-2013, 11:17 PM
      #20
    Yearling
    I was doing a lesson to get me started in jumping, and at the last half hour all my instructor wanted me to do was do spiraling circles in and out to try and "bend" my horse. The goal is to have a slight flex in body and neck as you tip the nose in slightly. I have never had suffered so much pain in my life. The horse in question fights flexion in his neck and kept it straight practically the entire time.

    Some horses will keep a flexed head even when a release of pressure is given. For example, a horse I was riding was being a little hot and walking off on me before I got situated. We did some circling (he has also become a champ at flexing to help his neck reigning, which is another good use for flexing) and he just kept circling with his head flexed in without the cue. But, it is also possibly that he was trained that way, as no one knows for sure how he was trained.

    Ground work helps to set up everything you plan on doing under saddle. If you want to work on flexing under saddle, ground work sets that in place. As soon as you feel the slightest give, release pressure. Pressure release is the reward.
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