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Questions about riding?

This is a discussion on Questions about riding? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        02-21-2013, 11:23 PM
      #21
    Yearling
    Yes. Keep the pressure until she realizes she can't walk out of it. It might also be how you are placed. Being on front of the shoulder, facing their butt--kinda, will make her back. I was taught to kinda be at the shoulder then ask. But, someone else might have a better explaination than I.
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        02-22-2013, 12:28 AM
      #22
    Yearling
    To me it sounds like Krissy doesn't know what you are wanting her to do, she was a tail to tail trail horse and probably never really had alot of training.
    I have a four year old we just started under saddle last fall, he was having a hard time understanding me squeezing my legs and wanting him to walk, he's very sensitive so I took my fingure and gave him a poke on the rump and after that he knew to walk on.
    We did some ground driving with him, so that really helped with the turning/stopping/backing while on him.....maybe do some ground driving with her and ground work.....good luck!
    LisaG likes this.
         
        02-24-2013, 08:39 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mistysms    
    I'm going to ask this now even tho I haven't done it with her yet. When I do start teaching her how to flex on the ground (or in saddle I guess) when I pull her head around to flex I almost know she is going to move to the side or back up. Should I just stay with her tell she gives me her head?
    Yes, she might move around, especially at first. That's okay.

    If she is resisting the bit, stay with her until she gives her head slightly. Don't worry about getting her to give her head completely at the beginning. You don't need to pull her nose to your foot. You just want her to begin to respond to the reins.

    As soon as she gives a little, release the rein right away. This way she'll get lighter.

    You'll be able to ask her to flex more as she gets the hang of it and loosens up. I personally don't pull their noses right to my foot, unless they're trying to buck me off or something.

    As she progresses, if you find she's snatching her head away as soon as you release the reins, you can ask her to give, then release part way once she yields. She'll likely hit the end of the rein, but just hold your hand still and ask her to soften again. Then, once she softens, release all the way. Does that make sense?

    Once she's flexing a little, you might want to get her to disengage her hip. So, ask her to flex her head (say to the left). Once she gives her head a little, you'll move your left leg back and cue her to move her hip to the right. She'll likely start moving, and once you feel her hind legs making big steps to the right, release everything. If you can't tell if she's doing what you want, have someone watch or do it from the ground first (I actually move the stirrup back with my hand and flap it into their sides, while keeping their heads flexed with a halter or bridle). This will kind of loosen her up and get her responding to leg cues.

    I try not to overdo any of this. Once the horses are flexing nicely and disengaging their hips, I move onto other stuff (though I will do a quick refresher every now and then). If you drill them too much, I think they can get bored.
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        02-24-2013, 08:55 PM
      #24
    Trained
    All good advice. All I have to add, as my signature says, reward every try. The key to all this type of training is knowing when to reward or release the pressure. If you ask her to give to a rein, the split second you feel slack in it, soften the pressure back so she knows she did the right thing. You don't have to make a huge "human" fuss over her when she does things right, but you do have to reciprocate and provide a release every single time she does what you ask. That kind of consistency is what's going to get you headed in the right direction.
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        02-24-2013, 09:01 PM
      #25
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    All good advice. All I have to add, as my signature says, reward every try. The key to all this type of training is knowing when to reward or release the pressure. If you ask her to give to a rein, the split second you feel slack in it, soften the pressure back so she knows she did the right thing. You don't have to make a huge "human" fuss over her when she does things right, but you do have to reciprocate and provide a release every single time she does what you ask. That kind of consistency is what's going to get you headed in the right direction.
    I totally agree. She'll learn more quickly, and hopefully she'll get lighter. The release is the reward.

    Also, when you're taking up the slack in the reins, to ask her to yield her head, do it a little slowly. Release pressure quickly, add it slowly.
    Thunderspark likes this.
         
        02-24-2013, 10:51 PM
      #26
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Thunderspark    
    To me it sounds like Krissy doesn't know what you are wanting her to do, she was a tail to tail trail horse and probably never really had alot of training.
    I have a four year old we just started under saddle last fall, he was having a hard time understanding me squeezing my legs and wanting him to walk, he's very sensitive so I took my fingure and gave him a poke on the rump and after that he knew to walk on.
    We did some ground driving with him, so that really helped with the turning/stopping/backing while on him.....maybe do some ground driving with her and ground work.....good luck!
    I've done ground driving with young horses as well. It's helpful for teaching them basic cues.

    I've never retrained a horse, and I think it must be difficult to figure out where the holes are in previous training. Ground driving might be something to look at if the horse seems confused by the basics.
         
        02-24-2013, 10:55 PM
      #27
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mistysms    
    Because my boyfriend was holding my horse and said she didn't really kick she pulled her foot out of his hand. But I don't kick my horses so I don't like anyone else to.
    Didn't read through the rest of this, but once you've had a few horse shoe nails pulled through your hand, you might change your mind about disciplining a horse that pulls his foot away. I still have big ugly scars on my palms. And darn rights, I'll discipline a horse that pulls his foot away.
    smrobs, COWCHICK77 and boots like this.
         

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