Re training off the track thoroughbreds? - Page 5
   

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Re training off the track thoroughbreds?

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    07-18-2011, 10:27 AM
  #41
Foal
Sire is Gulf Storm. Florida bred.
     
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    07-18-2011, 11:15 AM
  #42
Foal
First of all I would like to say thank you for taking the time to work with an OTT, i'm sure you will be rewarded greatly.

I am only 15, and my parents decided to buy me a ex racehorse; well that didn't go to plan - we didn't even buy one perfect for me, my pop went out and rescued my joe, he was then deemed my horse, and I had to put up with him.

I was not impressed at what was put infront of me, all my childhood dreams of owning a thoroughbred consisted of power, beauty and grace but what stood infront of me was none of that; Joe was bones, long mane and long feet, but I did fall in love with his quirky personality, and stuck with him - that was the best decision of my journey.


Joe last year -
P1000754.jpg

Joe end of last year -


40737_10150299487915068_670840067_15554028_1234613_n.jpg


Joe this year; first offical EFA show - 70cm.

sj.jpg


I am so proud of what he has accomplished as horse and he has changed my life completely.

My childhood fantasy has come true now; I do see beauty, power and grace - all because of him - Society Joe
[ATTACH]69919[/ATTACH


GOOD LUCK! X

OTT TB FOREVER! HAHA.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Joe4.jpg (33.4 KB, 180 views)
     
    07-18-2011, 02:45 PM
  #43
Green Broke
That is a beautiful story Society Joe, what a lovely boy you have there!
     
    07-19-2011, 12:45 PM
  #44
Foal
I love the Society Joe story! Congratulations.

I have had the privilege of retraining an OTTB. My boy "Sousa" retired from racing last year, at age 7, after 64 races. Completely clean and sound. We've had a wonderful journey together. He is very smart, I can almost feel him analyzing situations and learning and processing. He applies what he learns every time we work and he enjoys the challenge. He isnt hot, in fact if left to his own devices, he would just be lazy all the time. He complains sometimes when asked to work and protests, but we get past it quickly.

Having an ex-race horse has been a real dream fulfilled. They are grateful for their new life. But you still have an athlete in your presence. They have class and professionalism and good work ethic (most of the time) and are ever so glad to have found a new discipline.

I would recommend this to any competent, patient rider who loves horses and wants a wonderful and fulfilling challenge.

Good luck!
     
    07-20-2011, 05:11 AM
  #45
Foal
Another great thread with brilliant advice. My TB mare is very willing but only knows two speeds - flat out and stop. I feel much better about the challenge of training/transitioning her to new career as the ultimate trail horse after reading this. Thanks :)
     
    07-20-2011, 09:36 AM
  #46
Banned
Here is a reply I made to another thread:

Once in a while you can find a calm and sane OTTB, like our Beau, but many many more OTTBs are NOT calm and their sanity is questionable.

So, I agree and disagree.

I agree that not all OTTBs are basket cases, some are calm and affectionate and agreeable.

I disagree that a beginner should ever consider buying an OTTB. Because even a sane and calm horse like our Beau can have EXPLOSIVE moments...99 percent of the time he is an angel, but he is very high energy and he can explode in a moment's notice, due to flies, wind, fear, or just an excess of energy.

When my son got his OTTB, he was an intermediate rider and had had two years of Parelli training and a few months of Schrake horse training experience. Even so, Beau tested his courage and his knowledge. At the beginning, Beau was quite a handful ... that one percent of the time he exploded, he really went off.....whirling, bucking, kicking out and rearing in my son's face....sometimes so close he could feel the wind from Beau's hooves on his cheek. I had to cover my mouth to keep from shrieking and distracting my son....it was terrifying. And remember, Beau is a calm and agreeable OTTB.....imagine what the crazy ones are like.

So....we are now a year and a half into owning Beau, and how does he act now? Well.....he's an amazing and wonderfully well behaved boy.....but it took my son ONE FULL YEAR of DAILY Parelli ground work to get him to this point..... and I do mean EVERY day ...... my son did not miss one single day of doing ground work with Beau ....

So, owning an OTTB take alot of time, COMMITMENT... and knowledge of horse training techniques is a MUST!!!!!!!!

I think what the OP did was a wonderful thing in that so many OTTBs end up in slaughter pens due to the fact that the average person looking to buy a horse does not want a horse whose breed has a frightening and sometimes well deserved reputation for bad behaviour, mental issues and a myriad of health isssues... they tax a persons knowledge, courage, abilities, and commitment.......

I HIGLY urge the OP to hire someone to train her/him in Parelli, Anderson or Schrake techniques so that she can better deal with these issues when they crop up. Hiring someone to train the HORSE is good advice, but I think that the OP needs to be able to do the majority of the training HERSELF...so she needs the training right now more than the horse....

Because in my experience with an OTTB....just because he respects and behaves for the trainer does NOT guarantee they will behave for YOU. OTTBs tend to have the need to test every person who works with them. In other words, Beau is an angel for my son, but pushes my adult daughter around and is very naughty with her..... they test you. The OP needs to be able to pass that test.....


Just my input from having bought an OTTB only 3 months off the track...

**********************************************

Wanted to add for this thread that I used to board at a TB barn, and a goodly portion were indeed of questionable sanity and very dangerous, so the reputation that OTTBs have is not ENTIRELY undeserved.

Only one of the OTTBs there was calm and agreeable...and she was highly trained as after her racing days were over she was trained and ended up working as a Washington DC police horse.

The rest were.....not good horses for anyone other than an experienced trainer and rider. The BO at this barn was indeed highly trained and accredited by two differenent organizations as a trainer.....even so, these horses were extremely tempermental.

And as I stated above, even our 6 yr. Old OTTB has his tempermental moments where anything like a windy day or a horsefly can set him off.....and our boy is the calmest love bug you could ever hope to meet.

Even calm, sane OTTBs require more time and commitment to training than your average horse.....

JMO
     
    08-14-2011, 04:39 AM
  #47
Foal
Otttr

I've had a couple that have been very good horses.
First thing is to make sure of their soundness because they get worked hard very young;- be fair and be gentle in their work at the start as most will show some injury.

Apart from that I've found most to be very forward but usually quite tolerent of noise, cars, etc. Most race horses have to deal with this day to day.

In fact my favourite hack is an otttb and he is a total gentleman and actually looks for work when he spends to much time in the paddock.

Just use your normal horse sense and you will be fine.
     
    08-14-2011, 05:01 AM
  #48
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beauseant    
Here is a reply I made to another thread:

Once in a while you can find a calm and sane OTTB, like our Beau, but many many more OTTBs are NOT calm and their sanity is questionable.

So, I agree and disagree.

I agree that not all OTTBs are basket cases, some are calm and affectionate and agreeable.

I disagree that a beginner should ever consider buying an OTTB. Because even a sane and calm horse like our Beau can have EXPLOSIVE moments...99 percent of the time he is an angel, but he is very high energy and he can explode in a moment's notice, due to flies, wind, fear, or just an excess of energy.

When my son got his OTTB, he was an intermediate rider and had had two years of Parelli training and a few months of Schrake horse training experience. Even so, Beau tested his courage and his knowledge. At the beginning, Beau was quite a handful ... that one percent of the time he exploded, he really went off.....whirling, bucking, kicking out and rearing in my son's face....sometimes so close he could feel the wind from Beau's hooves on his cheek. I had to cover my mouth to keep from shrieking and distracting my son....it was terrifying. And remember, Beau is a calm and agreeable OTTB.....imagine what the crazy ones are like.

So....we are now a year and a half into owning Beau, and how does he act now? Well.....he's an amazing and wonderfully well behaved boy.....but it took my son ONE FULL YEAR of DAILY Parelli ground work to get him to this point..... and I do mean EVERY day ...... my son did not miss one single day of doing ground work with Beau ....

So, owning an OTTB take alot of time, COMMITMENT... and knowledge of horse training techniques is a MUST!!!!!!!!

I think what the OP did was a wonderful thing in that so many OTTBs end up in slaughter pens due to the fact that the average person looking to buy a horse does not want a horse whose breed has a frightening and sometimes well deserved reputation for bad behaviour, mental issues and a myriad of health isssues... they tax a persons knowledge, courage, abilities, and commitment.......

I HIGLY urge the OP to hire someone to train her/him in Parelli, Anderson or Schrake techniques so that she can better deal with these issues when they crop up. Hiring someone to train the HORSE is good advice, but I think that the OP needs to be able to do the majority of the training HERSELF...so she needs the training right now more than the horse....

Because in my experience with an OTTB....just because he respects and behaves for the trainer does NOT guarantee they will behave for YOU. OTTBs tend to have the need to test every person who works with them. In other words, Beau is an angel for my son, but pushes my adult daughter around and is very naughty with her..... they test you. The OP needs to be able to pass that test.....


Just my input from having bought an OTTB only 3 months off the track...

**********************************************

Wanted to add for this thread that I used to board at a TB barn, and a goodly portion were indeed of questionable sanity and very dangerous, so the reputation that OTTBs have is not ENTIRELY undeserved.

Only one of the OTTBs there was calm and agreeable...and she was highly trained as after her racing days were over she was trained and ended up working as a Washington DC police horse.

The rest were.....not good horses for anyone other than an experienced trainer and rider. The BO at this barn was indeed highly trained and accredited by two differenent organizations as a trainer.....even so, these horses were extremely tempermental.

And as I stated above, even our 6 yr. Old OTTB has his tempermental moments where anything like a windy day or a horsefly can set him off.....and our boy is the calmest love bug you could ever hope to meet.

Even calm, sane OTTBs require more time and commitment to training than your average horse.....

JMO

I just want to add that I do agree with you to an extent. In my opinion there are more sane OTTB's then people think. At the racing stable I work at I have only met maybe one or two that I would question their sanity. Every other horse is just fine. People just say they are crazy when they don't back down and do as they're told easily.

Most of the horses I handle are 2 yr olds that are barely handled and getting broken in. When they do explode some of the explode good and proper. When people see these moments they probably think they are crazy but really they just happened to spook violently that time or they are testing the boundaries with a new handler.

I don't think there is a single horse out of the 100+ horses currently on the property that I would question their sanity. They are either just not handled much or are still babies and have baby moments. They are just like any other breed.

I do agree that a lot of them have health problems and feet problems, they pick up some bad habits from being in stalls a lot.
That's just my two cent. :)
     

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ottb, thoroughbred, thoroughbreds, training

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