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Rearing

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  • Horse rearing and teeth

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    08-11-2012, 10:51 PM
  #1
Foal
Unhappy Rearing

I have a horse that every time you get on her touch your heels to her and cluck she walks a few steps than rears (no spurs) . She lunges fine with a saddle one with the stirrups and side reins but once you get on her and touch and cluck she rears. Any advice?
     
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    08-11-2012, 11:10 PM
  #2
Weanling
Find a professional to help you.
     
    08-11-2012, 11:26 PM
  #3
Showing
Rearing is probably the single most dangerous problem a horse can present.

You first need to make sure it's behavioral and not physical. Get a thorough health exam on her, check her saddle fit, and check for any problems in her mouth (sharp hooks need a float? Wolf teeth?). If it comes to it, find a chiropractor to check for any soreness in her back, neck, etc.

Once you've determined it's totally psychological, you have to ask yourself a few questions.

1. How long has this been going on?
2. Is she rearing out of confusion? Perhaps conflicting aids? Or is she rearing out of resistance?
3. How bad is it? If it's a few little hops you might, depending on your experience level, be able to work through it.

If it's any more than that or you find that you can't work her through it, it's time to find a trainer. It may just be that your position or aids are conflicting and causing her confusion, in which case lessons under a qualified instructor would be in order. It could also be a way that she's learned to avoid work, and if this is the case, she needs to be sent to a trainer for several months or sold.

Remember, there's no shame in selling a horse (or any animal, for that matter) to a more competant home that's able to deal with his problems.
Palomine likes this.
     
    08-11-2012, 11:43 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
Quote:
i have a horse that every time you get on her touch your heels to her and cluck she walks a few steps than rears (no spurs) . She lunges fine with a saddle one with the stirrups and side reins but once you get on her and touch and cluck she rears.
This is not nearly enough information.

1) How old is she?

2) Has she always done this?

3) Has she EVER been ridden successfully by someone else?

4) Obviously she rears when asked to go forward. Has her rider then gotten off and done more 'ground-work'?

I need to know if she is green and un-trained and does not know how to go forward or if she has just figured out how to get a rider to get off and quit riding her?

Without knowing these answers, there is no way to know what it going on or why she is rearing and there is certainly no way to offer advice for fixing the 'holes' in her training.
     
    08-12-2012, 12:55 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
This is not nearly enough information.

1) How old is she?

2) Has she always done this?

3) Has she EVER been ridden successfully by someone else?

4) Obviously she rears when asked to go forward. Has her rider then gotten off and done more 'ground-work'?

I need to know if she is green and un-trained and does not know how to go forward or if she has just figured out how to get a rider to get off and quit riding her?

Without knowing these answers, there is no way to know what it going on or why she is rearing and there is certainly no way to offer advice for fixing the 'holes' in her training.

I believe she is nine years old and she was trained successfully by a qualified trainer she was fine and anyone could ride her but the past 6 months she has been rearing no matter who rides her I have gotten off of her many times and went back to basic ground work as if she was a green horse I had my instructer get on her and she went a little bit farther but she still reared
     
    08-12-2012, 01:00 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by equiniphile    
Rearing is probably the single most dangerous problem a horse can present.

You first need to make sure it's behavioral and not physical. Get a thorough health exam on her, check her saddle fit, and check for any problems in her mouth (sharp hooks need a float? Wolf teeth?). If it comes to it, find a chiropractor to check for any soreness in her back, neck, etc.

Once you've determined it's totally psychological, you have to ask yourself a few questions.

1. How long has this been going on?
2. Is she rearing out of confusion? Perhaps conflicting aids? Or is she rearing out of resistance?
3. How bad is it? If it's a few little hops you might, depending on your experience level, be able to work through it.

If it's any more than that or you find that you can't work her through it, it's time to find a trainer. It may just be that your position or aids are conflicting and causing her confusion, in which case lessons under a qualified instructor would be in order. It could also be a way that she's learned to avoid work, and if this is the case, she needs to be sent to a trainer for several months or sold.

Remember, there's no shame in selling a horse (or any animal, for that matter) to a more competant home that's able to deal with his problems.
this has been going on for only the past 6 months or so. I am useing no extra aids except my heels, a bridle, and a saddle and saddle pad. And I am afraid it is much more than a few small hops it is like almost vertical but not quite
     
    08-12-2012, 03:05 PM
  #7
Showing
When she rears, do you get off and stop her work for the day? If so, you're rewarding her and she's learned that the easy-out is to rear up after a few steps so you untack her and put her back out to pasture. When she does this, you need to work her--hard. If you can't control it under saddle, dismount and move her feet from the ground. Make her back, sidepass, walk/trot by your side and then stop, and make her back up immediately when you stop. She needs to learn that rearing only results in more work.

Of course, I really don't have a good grasp on the situation from the information you've given us, and this could be completely irrelevant if the issue is caused by pain or greenness.
     
    08-12-2012, 05:42 PM
  #8
Super Moderator
She sounds very typical of the horses that rear because they have found out it works.

The most successful method I have used is to go to ground driving. I'm not talking about just driving one around in an arena or around the barn-yard a little. I'm talking about serious PRESSURE on one. I want the horse to drive over fallen logs, across ditches (really like one with water in it), through brush, up and down steep hills (I used a big pond dam a lot). I want a horse to go forward the instant I smooch . If they don't, they feel a really hard slap on the rump with big harness leather team lines. I stop, start, back up, go forward some more and I do not quit until the horse is completely cooperative. He is going to drive back and forth to and from the barn a hundred times if necessary. Only when he drives everywhere and has no resistance doing so does he get to stop (and it is going to be long way from the barn and he is going to be going forward willingly when I stop him. I will never let him decide when he is going to quit. That is how they get this way. I don't care if his head is hanging and sweat is running off his legs and belly.

THEN, when I ride him, I have heavy harness leather reins. The instant he stops or even acts like he wants to 'stall out', I 'over and under' him as hard as I can with the big, heavy reins. I do not quit until he is going forward FAST and WILLINGLY.

There is a HUGE difference between teaching and training a horse and correcting a bad habit in a spoiled horse. You have to make a horse pay a higher price than it is willing to pay to behave badly. Otherwise, it just keeps coming back over and over again.
calicokatt likes this.
     
    08-12-2012, 06:05 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by cinnamon    
i believe she is nine years old and she was trained successfully by a qualified trainer she was fine and anyone could ride her but the past 6 months she has been rearing no matter who rides her I have gotten off of her many times and went back to basic ground work as if she was a green horse I had my instructer get on her and she went a little bit farther but she still reared
What did your instructor do after she reared? Get off or put her back to work? What did your instructor say to do with her or was he/she unsure what to do?

Rearing can be scary. It does make some afraid to ride afterwards. My wife's horse was trained to rear with a command but he will also do if he gets frustrated. That's when I have to get on him to get him out of it.

I am not a professional trainer and I would suggest you get one to assess her in person. Here's what I do, and some may not like some of it. When I get on I ask for flexing, both side to side and down. Usually the down brings out the rear or backing him up. When he tries or does, I smack my hand on his neck and make him turn both directions energetically. I want him to realize that HIS decision to rear will cause more work. Then I will ask again whatever I had asked before the rear.

Now with your horse, as long as its not pain related and is just behavior, start her walking out but in a circle. I THINK she has sticky feet and just doesn't want to move forward. Again, I think this because that's just my assessment over the Internet. Instead of asking with both heels and clucking, ask her to move with one heel first and to turn. It's harder to rear while turning and their head is to the side. When she does move and doesn't rear, let her rest. Don't stop her from moving but let her stop if she wants. Ask again but the other direction. Repeat a few more times each way, then ask for just forward. The habit has been going on for 6 months and it won't go away in one session.

By the way, how are you holding the reins? Do you have excess slack in the or do you have them with very little slack or having contact with the bit? Try using more slack in the reins.

On more thing, when you ask her to move out, don't heel and cluck at the same time. Heel first and if she doesn't move then heel and cluck.
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    08-12-2012, 06:11 PM
  #10
Weanling
Find a professional trainer, please.

Rearing is a situation that can get very dangerous, very quickly. Asking for help is great, and I'm glad you are doing it, but without seeing your horse in person or being able to experience the horse's behavior, absolutely no one on this board could or should give advice on how to handle this horse and rearing.

Check her teeth, saddle fit, chiro, and hire a professional trainer. Preferably one who works with problem horses.
     

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