Rearing
 
 

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Rearing

This is a discussion on Rearing within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horse almost flipped rearing during lunging
  • Does a standing martingale stop rearing

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    11-26-2012, 03:06 PM
  #1
Foal
Exclamation Rearing

I have been having some major issues with my mare rearing recently. She is kind of a spazz when I longe her or work with her in a round pen and will rear at those times as well, but I am worried that her rearing under saddle is getting progressively worse. She is fine when I get on her, but as soon as I ask her to move forward, she rears. She has almost flipped over on me multiple times. I get off and longe her when she rears, which I know may be exactly what she wants, but I am not brave enough to just hang on until she flips on me. I don't want her to think rearing will get me to dismount, but I am not willing to sacrifice my safety to prove a point to her. I am in the process of finding a trainer, but I can't find anyone near where I live, so for now I am on my own. Any advice on how to deal with the rearing when it arises.
     
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    11-26-2012, 03:11 PM
  #2
Trained
She has a very dangerous problem which can easily kill you in a second! Do not attempt to ride this horse without someone experienced in dealing with rearers, please!
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    11-26-2012, 03:21 PM
  #3
Started
If you do not know how to deal with a rearer, please do not take it upon yourself to figure it out as it comes. You will end up hurt. I would not touch the horse until you found a trainer who is willing to work with your horse. Or better yet, get rid of the horse.
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    11-26-2012, 03:21 PM
  #4
Trained
If she rears, slide off and take her to meet jesus.

Run her sideways. Run her backwards. Chase her hip in circles. Run her sideways again. Lunge in tight circles and change directions a LOT. Run backwards again. Then sideways. Then the hip. Then backwards. Do it until she has sweat dripping from her eyes. Rearing is never in ANY way acceptable and you don't want to be on her back when they decide to take it to the next step. If she does it on the lunge, same thing. Make her MOVE. Smack her. If she goes over backwards , get out of the way, let her do it, and get back to working her. She won't be hurt. I've had colts flip over ONCE and be so traumatized by it that they never want to go up again. Others aren't scared of it though and just need to get a good talkin' to. Trust me, you don't want to mess with this.
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    11-26-2012, 03:23 PM
  #5
Trained
Adding on: If you can find a trainer that's even better. I don't give up on rearers but I can deal with it. Don't ever get on this horse alone.
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    11-26-2012, 03:59 PM
  #6
Green Broke
While a trainer is ALWAYS a good idea (one is never too "trained" to learn from someone else) in a dangerous rearing situation like this, some more background info would be good.

How old is the horse?

Is she greenbroke (new to riding)?

Has she been checked recently by a chiropractor and equine dentist? (Sometimes pain can cause a horse to lash out, so you want to check that.)

Does her tack fit properly, or is something pinching and causing pain?

Does she have good ground manners? (Does she get into your personal bubble or drag you around on the lead?)

When did she start doing this?

How (in great detail) are you cueing her to move forward?

How instantly are you lunging her to punish her? If there is any break longer than 3 seconds, she's not going to correlate her punishment to the rearing.
SorrelHorse and themacpack like this.
     
    11-26-2012, 04:19 PM
  #7
Started
I would start by having a vet look at her teeth. This means a drag out sedation, oral speculum we go hunting in the back of her head, NOT I call tommy-the-tooth guy who looks at her shrugs and says "she looks fine to me". Tooth pain and bit may have to do with this issue. What are you doing when you ask her forward? What bit do you have on her? What is your level of experience? Ie. First horse I ever owned or owned 500 this is the first one with this problem.
     
    11-27-2012, 06:21 PM
  #8
Foal
Thanks for the replies. To answer everyone's questions: she has been seen by both a vet and a dentist very recently and had her teeth floated as well. I do not think this is a pain issue. I have been using the exact same tack on her for almost a year now, and I have never had this problem before. She is nine years old, but very green for her age. She has been saddle broken for quite a few years, but hasn't been worked consistently or by very experienced riders throughout that time. The problem started about a month ago and has gotten progressively worse. I would consider myself a fairly experienced rider. I'm no trainer or anything, but I have been riding for almost 15 years now. She is my second horse, but I have leased and ridden many others and have never experienced this problem before. Her ground manners are not the most polite, but she isn't running me over every other step either. To move her forward, I squeeze with my lower leg, but even touching her with my calf makes her rear. I feel that when I get off and lunge her, that is exactly what she wants, even if I run her into the ground. I had a more experienced horse person come with me yesterday to help me out. She put a makeshift standing martingale on my mare that helped stop the rearing for a little while, but she learned how to get around it and I ended up on the ground. I am at a loss for what to do. Sorry for the long post. Thanks for reading. Any other help is greatly appreciated.
     
    11-27-2012, 06:24 PM
  #9
Trained
I would get acquainted with Clinton Anderson and try that method. Who knows, maybe if you fix the respect with him then your rearing problem will go away. I do his groundwork most days even on my finished horses. You could probably get the feel form watching some episodes.

www.downunderhorsemanship.tv
     
    11-27-2012, 07:02 PM
  #10
Trained
I won't touch a rearer with a 40 foot barge pole, and one that nearly flips either goes to live in the paddock, or gets a bullet in its head.
They are DANGEROUS! I know people who have been crippled for life, and killed, by rearers flipping over.
The fact that she is using rearing as an evasion to simply going forward is not good. This is a very big problem and I could never, not in a million years, give you advice on solving it over a forum - I don't want you being injured or killed hanging over my head.

If you REALLY like this horse, and she's super talented in your discipline, then take her to a very good, VERY qualified trainer. See what they think of her.
The issue with trainers though if you send the horse away without being part of the process, is that they may be able to convince her to stop rearing for them, but as soon as you take her home, it's likely that she'll start up again as she knows that she gets away with it with you.

Again, I wouldn't touch her. I value my life too much. Bad horses cost the same to keep as good horses, why risk your life on something so dangerous when there are many good, sane horses out there.
Elana, Adam and rookie like this.
     

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