rearing?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

rearing?

This is a discussion on rearing? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • "her spurs" rowels sharp horse
  • Rearing up and stiking horse what does it means can it be a excitement display

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-27-2010, 11:17 PM
  #1
SLS
Foal
rearing?

My T/B gelding is fine on the flat and jumping, but when it comes to gynkhanas at the start he rears sooo much. The only thing that stops it is a market harbourough but most the time they wont let me use it. Any ideas?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-27-2010, 11:24 PM
  #2
Trained
Has he been gamed extensively? Is it rearing of refusal to go into the gate, or overexcitement?

If it's the first, then he may need a good break from any kind of showing, or atleast gaming events; take him on trail rides, and don't focus on the gymkhanas. If he is fine for jumping/eventing, stick with that for a while, and give his mind a rest from gymkhana.

If it's the over excitement issue, I think you need to start working on calming him down. Ride him toward the arena, but as soon as he starts getting over excited, turn around, and go away, then turn around and try again, once he calms down...don't 'reward' the rearing, and excitement with going into the arena.

I don't think tie downs or anything is the solution here; you just need to get smart about how to handle him, and retrain his response to that situation.
     
    06-28-2010, 12:01 AM
  #3
Trained
Get control of his hindquarters, frontquarters and head and keep a bend in him. If he isn't perfectly straight from his head to his tail he CAN"T rear.
     
    06-28-2010, 12:09 AM
  #4
SLS
Foal
He has'nt been extensively shown, he came off the track four years ago tho. I think he just gets over excited.. he just gets impatient for them to say go. Thanx
     
    06-28-2010, 01:42 AM
  #5
Foal
My showjumper does the exact same thing, he will get through a couple of events fine but after that he just gets over-excited: backing up, jigging, trying to rear, and eventually rearing.

The best thing I've found that works is keeping him calm, after each event drop your reins and walk him out for a good 5 minutes until he's completely relaxed. Do the same thing before each event, walk him away from the group on a long rein and keep him relaxed, even walk him around and around in front of the start box before the judge has given you the ok to go.

It just comes down to getting him calm and keeping him calm. If you can practice at rallys or musters with the events, weave him in and out of the start pegs and walk him through the event and just around and around and around it until he STOPS getting excited. He'll soon learn to stay calm and treat each sporting event just like anything else.
     
    06-28-2010, 01:52 AM
  #6
Yearling
I second Lifeofriley - spend 10-15 minutes each time you ride on relaxation exersizes, even when you're just hacking at home. That way when you get to the event, you'll have the home experience to ask him to relax. Good luck and just keep at it!

My old mare used to get giddy at the gate as well - did some homework on just trotting the barrels and poles, slow her down and do it more often. Besides, if he's relaxed during your run, he's likely to focus and have tighter turns for you because he's not already gearing for the next turn!
     
    06-28-2010, 02:20 AM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
Get control of his hindquarters, frontquarters and head and keep a bend in him. If he isn't perfectly straight from his head to his tail he CAN"T rear.
This is not actually true, I had a mare that would flip herself over backwards from any possition, including bent. It can be more dangerous if they are bent when they rear because they don't have good balance that way. I also knew a mare that would rear with her head tied to her tail (not me doing the tying). It may work for some horses to bend them, but you can get the odd one who will rear worse if they are bent.
     
    06-29-2010, 11:01 PM
  #8
SLS
Foal
Yehh he does still rear in whatever position you put him in. Once he gets tired he just calms right down.. by the time i've even got to the second event im usually disqualified. I never get angry at him, always stay calm but everyone else seems to
     
    06-30-2010, 02:19 AM
  #9
Foal
I think you need to take a big break from running, loping, or even trotting in gymkhanas. Continue to go, but walk the pattern until that's what the horse expects.

If the horse rears lean forward, create forward nothing (slap on the rump/neck, or something that works for you).

Remember to give the horse somewhere to go.
     
    06-30-2010, 08:22 PM
  #10
Weanling
Do they have a box that you enter to go into it? My old sporting horse used to go off his nut just walking up to the 6m line, so I had to enter from the side of the box on a long rein.

Now, I see that no one else has asked this, but what could you be doing that makes him like this? I'm not saying that you are winding him up on purpose, blah blah blah... A girl I used to know used to gear her horse up with a standing martingale, stock saddle, pelham, short sporting reins, and huge roller spurs with a fairly sharp rowel. She would walk him up to the start line, tense up, saw at the reins, hold her hands in her lap (a near impossible feat with sporting reins), and constantly nag him with her spurs. Not just nag, like full on jab. She would do that until the starter told her to go and she'd release the reins... That horse is no longer rideable and is banned from most pony club grounds. So ask yourself, do you do anything to make him rear? I don't mean anything to the extent of the girl I know. It could be an unconsious thing. I know I tense up and my adrenaline levels rise when I'm about to go, so Barcoo tenses up himself, bucks and surges forward. My friend always unconsiously holds the reins a little tighter and grips with her legs so her horse gets nervous and prances up and down. Little things like that can get to the horse and get him excited - you probably won't know you're doing it until you look! There's a different point of view for you. It may not be something you are doing, but it's always best to look at yourself before the horse. "A bad workman always blames his tools" and all that - I got that saying absolutely drilled into me at pony club. I find it's the best piece of advice ever given to me.

If it's over excitement, then I would suggest having a break or taking all of the events extremely slow like in a walk or trot. You'll know if it's over excitement if he's chomping on the bit, frothing up, ears pricked, surging forward at the slightest touch, and a few other behaviours that I can't think of right now... If he continues with it after a while of breaks and going slow, you may like to think that he's just not the horse for it. I gave up sporting my horses because they got too over-excited and it was becoming dangerous, especially as most TBs are large horses and aren't as easy to sport as ponies, stock horses and QHs. Sorry if my response was a bit long, I really hope you get it back together with him and become a speedy team together. (I hope I didn't offend you in any way! That's why I don't like posting on forums haha.) =]
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rearing samc230 Horse Training 10 05-10-2010 01:31 PM
Rearing up Starr010 Horse Training 21 10-05-2009 01:33 PM
Rearing EveningShadows Horse Training 9 06-24-2009 11:32 PM
Rearing....HELP washington_rodeo_queen Horse Training 20 03-12-2008 10:58 AM
Rearing horse_luver4e Horse Training 81 01-26-2008 07:43 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0