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Rearing

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  • Definition of chronic rearer

 
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    07-28-2010, 05:08 PM
  #11
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastUnicorn    
Rearing is usually the horse's way of telling you they feel they cannot go forward.

So the first thing you need to do to "fix" it is to make sure you haven't closed all the doors against him. For some horses this might be a little too much contact with their face as well as too much leg... or it might be simply too much leg.

'Chronic' rearers are horses who have learned to anticipate that they "cannot" go forward. They need to be re-schooled so they understand they CAN go forward. I generally start this work on the ground... before getting back into the saddle - leading, lunging, and ground-driving, when I have established a good foward on the ground I get up in the saddle and do it there as well.

Then there is rearing related to pain... a horse with back pain or saddle fit issues may rear... a horse with teeth in need of floating may rear, or a horse who has been hit too hard in the mouth may rear. The only solution to this kind of rearing is to fix the pain.
These are good things to look into but I'm not exactly sure I'd go with your definition of a chronic rearer as I happen to own own. He was a rearer when I bought him at 3 and he is still a rearer at 26. Pain, fear, inability to move forward, all aspects of everything have been ruled out. His decision to rear is based soley on the fact that he's an ornery old cuss! I love him dearly but the rear is his "easy out" rather than the buck, run out, or the old stop and refuse to go.... That is definitely not the way with all horses but I do believe once a rearer... always a rearer... :(
     
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    07-28-2010, 05:26 PM
  #12
Yearling
NEVER EVER EVER yank a horses head left or right or back in forth while they are going to rear or are rearing! This will cause them to lose their balance and could possibly flip on you! You always ride them forward out of it! If you feel like theyre going to go up squeeze or kick or whatever you can to get them to go forward! A forward moving horse CANNOT rear.
     
    07-28-2010, 05:39 PM
  #13
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by FoxyRoxy1507    
NEVER EVER EVER yank a horses head left or right or back in forth while they are going to rear or are rearing! This will cause them to lose their balance and could possibly flip on you! You always ride them forward out of it! If you feel like theyre going to go up squeeze or kick or whatever you can to get them to go forward! A forward moving horse CANNOT rear.
This is only true for the horse at the apex of his rear or for a beginner rider. The quickest way to disengage a rear in the making is to crank that nose down to your knee. It's the ONLY way to completely disengage a rear as it's happening. If "kicking them forward" was that easy, the rear would never happen in the first place. You HAVE to disengage before you can unlock a horse dead set on rearing.
     
    07-28-2010, 05:47 PM
  #14
Green Broke
Agreed. ^ Rearing is a symptom of "sticky feet", so moving them forward is out of the question when they're beginning to rear, which is why it's recommended to circle instead of trying to get them to go forward.
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    07-28-2010, 07:37 PM
  #15
Trained
Basically, do whatever the heck it takes to get them moving forward. I don't care if it is beating on their ass. Rearing is such a dangerous habit - I had to watch a friend shatter his shoulder when the horse he was riding reared and flipped on him.

I don't give two hoots if it's pain, or fear, or whatever. Rearing is NEVER an acceptable action and all my horses know it. I holler for all i'm worth, get my heels or my spurs in, whip with my rein, whatever. As soon as they go forward, I stop, relax, and continue on.

After the fact, I will of course check for pain, etc. But during the fact, that doesn't even enter my mind.

However I like to avoid a rear ever happening by teaching my horses from the get go to be free in the feet and always have control of the feet.

If they do actually leave the ground (Not often, I have a pretty scary growl when I try!) I also crank that head to my knee and kick the hip over for all im' worth. If they do actually go up, I whale on them and keep them going in a tiny circle until they are puffing.

Not, EVER acceptable.
     
    07-28-2010, 08:27 PM
  #16
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by farmpony84    
These are good things to look into but I'm not exactly sure I'd go with your definition of a chronic rearer as I happen to own own. He was a rearer when I bought him at 3 and he is still a rearer at 26. Pain, fear, inability to move forward, all aspects of everything have been ruled out. His decision to rear is based soley on the fact that he's an ornery old cuss! I love him dearly but the rear is his "easy out" rather than the buck, run out, or the old stop and refuse to go.... That is definitely not the way with all horses but I do believe once a rearer... always a rearer... :(
I used to work with "problem" horses for a living. I "specialized" in rearers because no other trainer in my area wanted to deal with them and it's a vice that actually bothers me a lot less than many others - chronic rearers especially.

I have never met one yet that was not a simple case of not really understanding forward, once pain was ruled out. ALL cases I've worked on never reared again once they understood forward.

There are all kinds of reasons why a horse might feel he can't go foward -to us some of those may be a 'mystery' because we don't think the same way as a horse. I've met a few cases where the problem was actually in initial training - they had a total lack of TRUE forwardness and were working in a constant "borderline" state - not really under control, but not really out of control either. These were generally the horses that were called "ornery", "stubborn", "stupid" etc.

Some horses are more prone to rearing over anything else - it just seems more "natural" for them to go up, rather than buck. I've rarely found a horse who is both a rearer AND a bucker, but I've come across a few.
     
    07-28-2010, 08:37 PM
  #17
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by FoxyRoxy1507    
NEVER EVER EVER yank a horses head left or right or back in forth while they are going to rear or are rearing! This will cause them to lose their balance and could possibly flip on you! You always ride them forward out of it! If you feel like theyre going to go up squeeze or kick or whatever you can to get them to go forward! A forward moving horse CANNOT rear.
Let me assure you, if you have their head firmly on one side before they leave the ground, they will not rear. It is biophysics - they cannot do it! They might get a couple of little hops in but that's about it. If they are already right up in the air, you are right, it is dangerous to mess with their balance however there are PLENTY of warning signs that they are about to go up so you should have enough time to take evasive action. Rearing takes planning on behalf of the horse: They have to stop and collect before they will be able to come up on the hindquarters giving you plenty of time to combat this manouvre!

Also, you are correct that a forward moving horse cannot rear however it is not always as simple as giving a kick to get a stubborn horse moving forwards, otherwise horses wouldn't learn this ugly habit as a way of misbehaving. Sometimes it takes a combination of turns, side passes and leg yielding to get that forwards movement.
     
    07-28-2010, 08:47 PM
  #18
Foal
Ive delt with a cronic rearer and a few other horses that do it as well.

What I do is as soon as the horse is back down, I flex their face to my boot and their ass meets my split reins. I release once the horse has stoped moving then I push them foward. Never had to do it more than 3 times on a horse for it to completly stop rearing
     
    07-28-2010, 08:48 PM
  #19
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastUnicorn    

I have never met one yet that was not a simple case of not really understanding forward, once pain was ruled out. ALL cases I've worked on never reared again once they understood forward.

I'm not going to argue. I've owned Pistol for 23 years. I've done every technique except flipping him over. He knows how to move forward. He has done english, western, and dressage in his lifetime. He walks, trots, canters, side passes, leg yields, bends, prances, jumps, etc. He is now a semi-retired trail horse. Rearing is his form of saying no. That is what it is, it's what it has always been.

I'm glad that you've cured all the rearers you've ever met. It is still my opinion that there is no true cure for a rear. Not even old age. And I do believe horses can be ornery. It doesn't mean he's not smart, doesn't mean he's not kind and loving... Just ornery. It's part of what I love about him.
     
    07-28-2010, 09:20 PM
  #20
Foal
My friend trained her horse to rear on command, but then the horse started doing it whenever. They tried to retrain her out of it with little success. So her grandpa (an old cowboy) got on with a warm water balloon, the horse reared and he let it go over her head. That horse hit the ground so fast (like alllll the way down) and just lied there. I think she thought she killed herself. She never reared again.
     

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