Rearing
   

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Rearing

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  • Rearing on the ground solution clinton anderson
  • Clinton andersons info on arearing horse

 
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    06-21-2011, 03:33 PM
  #1
Weanling
Rearing

I just acquired a filly on Sunday and knew she was untouched she's two years old some where she learned rearing as an escape any tips on discouraging that behavior? She's smart but is looking for a leader you can see this every time I interact with her I lunged her a bit changing direction this afternoon just long enough for her to figure out I can move her feet any direction she caught on fairly quick I think she will come around with daily handling and work, but the rearing I want to nip in the bud asap.
     
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    06-21-2011, 03:51 PM
  #2
Foal
Awww rearing, don't you hate that. Does she rear on the ground or when your under saddle? If she rears on the ground yank down on the halter to were she is so uncomfortable she backs ups. You might have to yank hard more than once. Have had people tell me that if a horse rears while your under saddle is to bonk them on the head right between thier ears with a english bat. Or before you go that route when she comes down work those feet at a trot in cirles till she get tired. When she stops rearing let her walk.
     
    06-21-2011, 03:58 PM
  #3
Started
Welcome! I hope that your experience here is a pleasant & educational one!

Horses don't understand punishment, but instead will think that you've gone predator/want to kill them, if you start striking them as punishment!

You're going to get differing responses from people here, all of whose qualifications are unknown to you, rendering you unable to decide who, if anyone, has the answer for your particular horse.

There's no generic solution for rearing, anyway, because no horse is generic.

My hope is that you'd get a qualified person to visit & deal with your horse, & help you with the issue.

That said, I commend you for seeing that the filly is looking for a leader. So, you know that if you're the friendly & wise leader, she'll drop the rearing & join up with you.
     
    06-21-2011, 04:04 PM
  #4
Weanling
On the ground she isnt mature enough for riding I did that today I use Clinton Andersons rope halter and lead the lead the old owner had was a flimsy rope halter Clintons halter has more bite I did bump her nose hard when she went up I also pulled her off balance she seemed puzzled as to what happened and why she wasnt loose.
     
    06-21-2011, 04:11 PM
  #5
Weanling
I have to get her on the ground with all 4 feet before she joins up I worked her waited for her to signal she was listening and I was who she was focused on and allowed her to join up she isnt my first go round training she is my first go round at a rearing horse I don't beat my horses I don't believe you get any where hitting them. I do believe in respect and a safe horse.
     
    06-21-2011, 04:22 PM
  #6
Foal
Your definitely going in the right direction. I'm a HUGE!! Fan of Clinton Anderson. I use a lot of his methods for training the rescue horses. Keep using Clinton and your horse is going to be amazing. Don't let anyone tell you different about him. Lol.
     
    06-21-2011, 04:29 PM
  #7
Weanling
I use Clinton Anderson and Chris Cox both have great tools and methods.
     
    06-21-2011, 04:33 PM
  #8
Doe
Weanling
Northern is absolutely right.
The typical 'yanking down on the halter' may or may not work depending on the horse. Either way I would suggest that its not the most logical method. Why? Well watch a horses head when you pull on the halter. What happens? It usually braces and pulls back further.
Consider this instead. Did you ever lock the back brake on your pedal bike as a kid and lift the front wheel up while stationary? Now try doing it without locking the back brake. It's effectively impossible. Horses are the same. If they can't lock their back feet up then they cannot rear. How you achieve that is down to your own approach and preferred methods.
The other principle issue is why she is rearing. You say it's avoidance, but avoidance of what? Too much pressure? Fear? Aggression from her? Understand the reason and you can avoid the reaction without any training.
HTH and best of luck.
     
    06-21-2011, 04:46 PM
  #9
Weanling
No aggression from her yet I've only had her since Sunday am working with her in small sessions because of her lack of handling from her breeder. She rears and pulls back this is why I say she has learned that doing this she gets away from what she doesnt want to do except I hang on or pull her off balance so she can't run off she is two the breeder said he'd barely ever pet her let alone halter lead anything else I am assuming when I called to look at her they put her in two day boot camp I knew the rearing may be an issue because she did that with the trailer loading and each time they let go of the rope and she got her escape.
     
    06-21-2011, 05:54 PM
  #10
Weanling
I agree with Northern and Doe and anyone else that talks about developing the partnership. I've dealt with quite a few rearers over the years and sometimes people have told me that they rear but when I start handling or riding it suddenly disappears. First I try to make friends and it sounds like you're already doing that. Then if the rearing begins on the ground I ask them to move forward and I actually facilitate the escape. I love the look in their eyes when they discover that I keep coming along. It doesn't take long. Try not to let go of the rope just keep running with them until they stop and then ask them to do what you originally asked again. Patient persistence in the proper position. In the saddle I do pretty much the same thing but it does depend on the situation like if I can't ask them to go forward because I'm beside a cliff or something like that. So you need to use your judgement - of course. On the ground I do not pull or apply any pressure on the halter because they have already learned that they are way stronger than you. So why enter that battle.

Good luck.
     

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