Rearing bits? - Page 3
 
 

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Rearing bits?

This is a discussion on Rearing bits? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        01-02-2013, 10:15 AM
      #21
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 66Domino    
    Equipment like that doesn't do anything but put a bandaid on a gaping wound. Rearing is a refusal to move forward. My suggestion is check the saddle and bit to make sure it isn't creating pain in the back or mouth. If a horse cannot avoid bit pain, it's only option is to go up.

    Begin with longe work and get the horse moving forward, forward, forward. Change up the routine and let it use its mind. Several serpentines with circles and change of direction keep the horse's mind active.

    Finally, if this had now become learned behavior you're going to require professional help. If a situation like this continues, the horse is ruined and becomes a danger.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    After reading the entire post, perhaps it's your friend and not the horse. If she is only riding once a month, chances are she hasn't developed any sensitivity in her hands or leg strength. Perhaps best solution is to sell the horse and get something more akin to a draft cross. Very pretty and very tractable. Wanting to 'play' at being a horsewoman usually end badly - especially for the horse. Maybe you can get her interested in motorcycles. ;)
    Posted via Mobile Device
    tikapup1 likes this.
         
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        01-02-2013, 10:33 AM
      #22
    Super Moderator
    I've used a chifney on a few horses that were dangerous to lead because they'd been allowed to get into the bad habit of rearing to avoid compliance. I found they worked really well and stopped the problem dead in its tracks.
    They are not for riding in under any circumstances
    Yes they are a 'band aid' but sometimes needs must and rather a band aid than a horse standing on its back legs over the top of you.
    The idea shouldnt be that you use it as a permanent thing but as part of re-educating, gaining respect and control and breaking the rearing cycle programme.
    Yes it will give the horse some pain when it tries to fight it but not as much pain as the horse will give you if it lands on you
    Muppetgirl and LisaG like this.
         
        01-02-2013, 10:45 AM
      #23
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cherie    
    It is simply attached to a flat leather halter with snaps. The lead-shank goes through the bottom ring of the halter and the bottom ring of the bit. They are very commonly used in the racing industry where the horses are so fed up to such a 'high' and goofy state that it is not just a matter of 'manners'. The last thing you want to do with the young horses that these are usually used on is longe them in circles when they are only high as a kite. People feed them up to be crazy and then cuss them because they are.

    I used to get in some of these long yearlings that came from the big TB sales. I had to 'let them down' just like a horse coming off of the race track before I could start them under saddle. Until they started to come down, you could not handle them at all with out a Chifney bit or a chain shank. They would come out of a stall and their feet barely touched the ground. They were snorting fire like dragons. Once they came down a little, they trained just like any other horse, but not before.

    The Chifney bit I had (and the others that I had seen) were thicker than this one and were straight across on the straight side and did not have the bow in it that pushes down on the tongue. I do not like the design of the one shown.

    I cannot even imagine trying to ride in one. That is certainly not what they are designed for.
    Thanks for explaining that Cherie. We used them a lot at the track, and yes the horses were beyond unmannered, they were high. We always snapped the bottom ring through the lead snap and the halter.....never ever did anyone snap the lead solely onto the bottom ring of that bit....that's a disaster waiting to happen, a broken jaw for sure. When using one of these bits, a lot of people think they are pulled on or down on, experienced people will bump the horse with it - you pull down on one of these bits and you're asking for trouble.

    To be very honest, using one of these bits to manage an unruly TB 2 year old is better than having it run off or hurt someone. In saying this, a lot of people condemn the use of these bits and preach groundwork.....if you've ever worked in the intensive TB racing industry you would understand that this is just not feasible, staff donot have all day to fix a horse that gets hyper.....because most of them are that way. It's the nature of the industry.
    Cherie, jaydee and LisaG like this.
         
        01-02-2013, 11:12 AM
      #24
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Muppetgirl    
    Thanks for explaining that Cherie. We used them a lot at the track, and yes the horses were beyond unmannered, they were high. We always snapped the bottom ring through the lead snap and the halter.....never ever did anyone snap the lead solely onto the bottom ring of that bit....that's a disaster waiting to happen, a broken jaw for sure. When using one of these bits, a lot of people think they are pulled on or down on, experienced people will bump the horse with it - you pull down on one of these bits and you're asking for trouble.

    To be very honest, using one of these bits to manage an unruly TB 2 year old is better than having it run off or hurt someone. In saying this, a lot of people condemn the use of these bits and preach groundwork.....if you've ever worked in the intensive TB racing industry you would understand that this is just not feasible, staff donot have all day to fix a horse that gets hyper.....because most of them are that way. It's the nature of the industry.
    I understand what you're saying and have rescued several track thoroughbreds, yep - I've seen what happens. Had a friend that was a race trainer. Problem I see is this person appears inexperienced. That said, it appears using this type if equipment is a disaster in the making. She appears to need a reality check more than a stronger bit. Time and again I've seen people not handle horses and then expect them to behave like a dog. When our foal was still wet from the womb, we touched it all over, slipped a halter on it and tapped its feet. Every day someone worked with that baby. We now have yearling that lead, stand quietly for the vet and farrier and will one day make great saddle horses. It's always easier to fix something in the beginning. Giving an inexperienced horse person that kind of bit (she thought she could ride in it) is like asking your buddy to give you a root canal because they've been to the dentist.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Muppetgirl likes this.
         
        01-02-2013, 12:23 PM
      #25
    Super Moderator
    The horse the OP's friend has is absolutely not suitable for an inexperienced owner/rider - I've seen so many wonderful horses and ponies over the years that wouldnt dream of taking advantage under any circumstances and that's what this person needs - unfortunately some people who own horses like this actually believe its the way they handle them that makes them so good and easy when in fact its just down to temperament and they do tend to 'preach' a bit. Then they find themselves with a real attitude horse and it all falls apart really fast
    Its not a question of horses 'thinking' they are bigger and stronger - they ARE bigger and stronger and the secret is to not allow them to discover that or sometimes to come up with a way of overcoming it.
    Those of us here who have said we've used things like chifney bits aren't novice owners - though we all started out that way of course - its not something I would suggest a nervous person gets involved with. Even if she sent the horse to a trainer to sort it out I've frequently seen horses like this revert back really fast once they figure out they are back with someone less capable
         
        01-02-2013, 10:34 PM
      #26
    Foal
    I see it as the horse having a problem with my friend, she is extremely nervous around horses and because she is so nervous when her horse plays up she cries and hops off the horse letting the horse get away with it, she can't follow through with disciplining her horse, I don't mean to sound like a bad friend but it sort of annoys me because this horse was a really nice horse to me she's ruined her horse what is really annoying me even more is that they have now created a problem horse and are now trying to sell her on, to me its such a big problem i'd only sell her to a horse trainer or someone with alot of experience but I doubt that happening.
    Its only matter of time until the horse or rider gets injured, I just don't get how she can do this, I only hope this horse goes to an experienced home so no one gets hurt.
         
        01-02-2013, 10:37 PM
      #27
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 66Domino    
    After reading the entire post, perhaps it's your friend and not the horse. If she is only riding once a month, chances are she hasn't developed any sensitivity in her hands or leg strength. Perhaps best solution is to sell the horse and get something more akin to a draft cross. Very pretty and very tractable. Wanting to 'play' at being a horsewoman usually end badly - especially for the horse. Maybe you can get her interested in motorcycles. ;)
    Posted via Mobile Device
    i think she is better off getting lessons with a really good trainer I don't think she's capable of owning a horse at this point I time.

    I think motorcycles would be to fast for her...i think ice skating is more her forte.
    Did I even spell that right? Hahahaha
         
        01-02-2013, 10:44 PM
      #28
    Foal
    I'd say either your friend needs a very mellow horse, or some good horsemanship lessons. If your schedule only allows you to work with your horse once every few weeks, the smart thing would be to get a horse that is suitable for her.
         
        01-02-2013, 10:47 PM
      #29
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jmdnarri    
    I'd say either your friend needs a very mellow horse, or some good horsemanship lessons. If your schedule only allows you to work with your horse once every few weeks, the smart thing would be to get a horse that is suitable for her.
    she really only rides 3 to 4 times a month I think it might be a good idea for her to have riding lessons and maybe she could take her lesson horse to PC when we have a rally. If she was aloud.
    Cherie likes this.
         
        01-02-2013, 10:55 PM
      #30
    Trained
    Like other people have said, I think this horse's issue is respect.
         

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