Rearing?!? Circus?!? - Page 2
 
 

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Rearing?!? Circus?!?

This is a discussion on Rearing?!? Circus?!? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        08-23-2009, 09:27 PM
      #11
    Foal
    Well he is a 22 yr old arabian. He is 100% broke and I have been riding for about 5 years
         
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        08-24-2009, 12:54 AM
      #12
    Trained
    If you have a lot of experience with horses then it would be a fun trick. I don't think it would be terribly dangerous and won't make your horse have a rearing problem. In fact if your horse did have a rearing problem that would be a method to control it. Like teaching a dog that barks a lot "speak". People used to say that teaching your horse to lay down would get them laying down whenever they wanted to but we know that's not true. I agree that the horse should be very well broke and you need to make the cue very clear and somehting you won't be likely to inadvertenly do. Every time we teach our horses something new (even circus tricks like bowing or rearing) it strenghtens the bond and increases the horses trainability.
         
        08-25-2009, 04:08 PM
      #13
    Zab
    Yearling
    Let people teach their horses what they want. It's only a problem if you do it wrong. For one..horses can already rear perfectly. You're only teaching a cue for it.
    The problem is that they might confuse the cue, in which case you need to re-teach and that can be difficult.

    Let's face it, most horses that rears dagerously and as a protest, did it without anyone teaching them too.
         
        08-25-2009, 04:16 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    At 22 I don't think I'd teach him to rear. I'd be afraid it would cause too much added stress on his back and joints, but that's just my opinion. Also, as someone that owns a rearer, unless your horse has the perfect mind, I personally would advice against it. It can be very dangerous.
         
        08-25-2009, 04:21 PM
      #15
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by farmpony84    
    at 22 I don't think I'd teach him to rear. I'd be afraid it would cause too much added stress on his back and joints, but that's just my opinion. Also, as someone that owns a rearer, unless your horse has the perfect mind, I personally would advice against it. It can be very dangerous.
    I agree completly with farmpony even the owning a rearer bit I wouldnt do it but that is just my opinion
         
        08-25-2009, 05:01 PM
      #16
    Showing
    Just as a side note, I would never buy a known rearer. Ever. So if you ever have to sell your horse, know that the market for an old horse that rears is next to nil.
    Please do not do it.
         
        08-25-2009, 05:17 PM
      #17
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    Just as a side note, I would never buy a known rearer. Ever. So if you ever have to sell your horse, know that the market for an old horse that rears is next to nil.
    Please do not do it.
    I bought a known rearer as a 3 year old. Slapped a command in place and thought it was cool... Until I realized that he also reared when he was excited, bored, mad, sad.... AND on command. As he got older, he picked up the "I'm going to rear from the ground now because I don't want to be led to the barn" routine.

    He is 25 now and will still rear if he has the mind too... He was my first horse so I made alot of mistakes with him. One reason I never sold him is partly because I felt he was dangerous to someone that did not know him or how to deal with a rear and that he could potentially hurt someone, OR that someone would more then likely lose their temper with him and beat him, punish him, send him to auction or put him down as a dangerous animal. Dont' get me wrong, I love him dearly but he is mine and only mine.
         
        08-25-2009, 08:08 PM
      #18
    Showing
    Safety issue

    Teaching a horse to rear, among other things has its time and place. Unless you have a lot of experience dealing with horses, I wouldn't be teaching your horse to rear. I've been with horse, trained babies and youngsters for 13 years and I don't know that I would even take on that task.

    I have a miniature horse I will be teaching rearing to but that's a totally different ball game.

    Teaching a horse rearing is asking for trouble and you're going to get yourself and your horse in big trouble because one day, you're going to ask him to do something he won't want to do and he's going to revert to that "cute trick" you taught him and he's going to rear.

    There are dozens of other really neat tricks you can teach him that are safe, go for those.
         
        08-25-2009, 08:10 PM
      #19
    Showing
    I agree, Kelly! What about "smile" or even "bow" or "fetch"? I will look at a horse that bows, smiles or fetches and go "wow great training" before I will ever commend rearing.

    Except perhaps with a mini haha
         
        08-25-2009, 08:35 PM
      #20
    Zab
    Yearling
    I swear, somewhere in the world there is people shaking their heads and saying "they teach their horses to jump? That can't be good! Someday it will decide not to stay in the pasture and jump out! Or what if the horse decides to jump over random things when they ride?"

    There's a lot of bad habits with horses. Some horses will run off with you.. does that stop you from teaching them a canter cue? Some horses will stop and refuse to go..do you refuse to teach them a halt then? Some will start backing, so you better not teach them that.

    There was a time when it was very common to teach riding horses to rear, jump off the ground, kick etc. Those horses didn't do it ''because they wanted to get out of work''. Just like any horse that know how to canter won't take off just because it get's annoyed. Those who does would have done it anyway. It's natural for them.

    And those that are trained poorly (think of small ponies trained by kids without proper guidance) they often have bad habits, not because trhe kids taught them things, but because they thaught it in a bad way.

    It's much better to spread the safe way to teach things, than letting those who wants to do it, experiment on their own. Because they will.
         

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