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Rearing on command

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  • Horse commands piaf

 
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    02-03-2009, 10:50 AM
  #11
Yearling
I have taught my one mare to rear on command. I do it by ticking back on the left rein and sliding my right leg back behind the girth. She does it and the minute I stop, she stops. She knows the difference. I don't plan on ever getting rid of her, so its not a problem for me. She does it in any bit, so its not that the bit is pinching her.
     
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    02-04-2009, 02:30 PM
  #12
Zab
Yearling
As long as the ce for rearing is different from other cues, and you're consistent in telling them of when they do it a the wrong time, it can't be a problem.
The horse already knows how to rear, I just tell him to do it when I ask.
Just like he knows how to canter, just because I teac him a cue for it doesn't mean he'll keep cantering whenever he feels like it..'

All those spanish horses, n the spanish ridingschool.. you think they're dangerous? They let small kids ride them too..

And it's sad about the horse that slipped, bt that was an accident. It cvould have slipped in the pasture or in a canter too.

CMT: that was one I havn't heard of :)
     
    02-04-2009, 02:58 PM
  #13
Zab
Yearling
One of the reasons I'm going to go through with this, btw, is to be another one on the side that doesn't get a problem because the horse knows how to rear on command.
I think people have this idea it's ''so dangerous and the horse will keep doing it all the time''.. but it's really not fair to the trick. Lots of horses can rear without it ever being a problem. A few get problematic with it, just like a few learns to run off with their riders... but it's not because they're taught to do it, it's because they're taught to do it in a way that can be misunderstood by the horse, or because the rider isn't consistent when the horse does it at the wong time for some reason. The horses that does it just to get rid of their riders would most probably do it anyway, taught or not.

I have a friend who taught their horse when they were kids. It never reared unless it was asked to, never to get rid of the rider. But, they made the mistake of ''pulling and kicking'' and the horse leaernt to rear instead of backing. They couldn't get it to back after that (not sure how much they tried tho), but the horse didn't do it ''just because'', it just misunderstood the signals because it couldn't differ them.
     
    02-04-2009, 03:04 PM
  #14
Trained
So out of curiosity, what is your cue going to be to teach the horse to rear?
     
    02-04-2009, 03:37 PM
  #15
Zab
Yearling
Hands (reins) raised up about 5", a steady but not hard pull/contact, sitting deep, heels against the sides and a firm ''upp!" voice command. Not going to allow it without the voice command as that's the safety if another rider ever rides him.

For backing it's normal rein height, small, light ''pulses'' in the rein, normal seat and the legs stroking the sides backwards gently. If he seems insecure I click with my tounge, because I do that when I back him from the ground too.

Last time I rode I practiced some and he seemed mostly confused (first time for him), but today he seemed to have understood it. I backed, walked, ''reared'', walked, backed and he got it right all three times. :) I shouldn't be surprised, he always seem to understand a thing better the second session than the first. But we of course need to work much more on it to make it really safe.
And I have to remind myself not to be sloppy with him doing the right thing at all, and always tell him off if he backs when he should rear, or rears when he should back.
     
    02-04-2009, 07:56 PM
  #16
Yearling
I have a horse that could rear on command but I discontinued it because he did try to do it all the time...

Heres my argument on why you shouldn't.... There are many other parlor tricks you can teach your horse that are alot more impressive and alot safer and some are even useful like the bow or lay down (cause then you can mount bareback really easily) my horse bows, walks on his knees, lays down rolls over, I can sit on his tummy and pedal his legs.. He can sit, turn around on a sit, salute at a sit, pick pocket, yes, no, kisses, blow his nose in a hankie.. ect.

The second reason... horse people like me will look at you and think your an idiot who is going to hurt someone or kill themselves. (I really do mean this in the nicest way possible.) To me its kind of like looking at someone who is riding with their heels up, hunched over and flapping their elbows like a chicken saying giddy up or yeehaw... Its just silly and ineffective.
     
    02-04-2009, 08:55 PM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MustangMan08    
my friend had a app that would rear on command when your on his back. You had to pull the reigns back a certian way tho. It was neat except for the fact I learned to ride on that horse and nobody told me about it. I never fell off or anything luckly he was 22 when I started riding him and he didnt feel like getting to high lol
i can say I have had the same experience except I had purchaced my appy and had him about a year he was about 19 at the time and was never told he had been taught or what the cue was to get him to .. well I started doing alittle reining and one the cues I used in reining was right simalar to his rearing cue and well I wasnt to pleased my trainer got on him and niether was he that's when it came out that he had been trained to do it I would defintly tell the person if you ever do sell the horse how you got them to do it and let them beware so that they can go other rounds if they need to
     
    02-05-2009, 09:42 AM
  #18
Zab
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by starlinestables    
I have a horse that could rear on command but I discontinued it because he did try to do it all the time...

Heres my argument on why you shouldn't.... There are many other parlor tricks you can teach your horse that are alot more impressive and alot safer and some are even useful like the bow or lay down (cause then you can mount bareback really easily) my horse bows, walks on his knees, lays down rolls over, I can sit on his tummy and pedal his legs.. He can sit, turn around on a sit, salute at a sit, pick pocket, yes, no, kisses, blow his nose in a hankie.. ect.

The second reason... horse people like me will look at you and think your an idiot who is going to hurt someone or kill themselves. (I really do mean this in the nicest way possible.) To me its kind of like looking at someone who is riding with their heels up, hunched over and flapping their elbows like a chicken saying giddy up or yeehaw... Its just silly and ineffective.
Good for me that I don't care about what ''horse people like you'' think :P
You think the same way about the stallions in the spanish ridingschool?
How do you know I'm not teaching him those too? And that argument is a variation of ''there is no reason to..'' But face it, in photography (yes, I enjoy to take photos, and set up photos, especially fantasy and medieval-ish) it's much more impressive nd powerful with a rearing horse than a bowing one. A bowing one can of course be nice with a far lady on it's back.. but I'm no fair lady.. :P And frankly.. I don't care about those other things.
''kissing'' horses can accidentally bite your lip off, horse that learns to shake hoof or nod often manage to kick or knock people. I know several examples. And what if the sitting horse suddenly sits down on the lesson? Or worse.. sits down ona small kid? :O If your horse does pretty much anything constantly against your will, you have a training problem.
I rode a horse taught to lie down.. he lied down with a rider and all as soon as he got bored. Broke a leg of one f the kids on my lesson. So don't claim those things, or anything else, to be safer... it's all about how you teach them.

If you teach a horse to rear, you just have to make sure he doesnt confuse the cues, or associates rearing with stress. Most ''ordinary'' people who teaches there horses to rear, does it by either a ''pulling and kicking''-type method, uses the same cues for backing or take the chance when the horse is stressed. Is it strange that those horses rears in pressed situations?
The other tpe of ''ordinary'' riders that teach their horses to rear, does it by the trick training method where you only tell the horse when it's good. That's equally wrong, because they arn't consistent with telling the horse off for doing it when t shouldn't. -how can the horse knw thatit's not a good thing to do all the time?
And some are just inconsistent in all.

My horse is far from a mean one, he never protests, he gets confused at times and he's much forward. But he doesn't fight the rider, he always tries to do what's asked of him. If I make sure he knows wen to rear and when not to, why on earth should he suddenly start rearing when he's not supposed to? Because he think it's fun? He doesn't think it's fun to gt told off. Because he gets scared? Why would he be more eager to rear when he's scared after he got a cue for it than before? He'd run at the most.

He has reared pretty high with a rider before (in a controlled but not-allowed way..:P), when he got confused in the start, so he knows very well how to rear. He hasnt done it since and all it took to stop him was a firm no and command forward.

I know people who has taught rearing horses a command for their bad habit, and that way made them quit rearing. Just like you can teach a barking dog ''bark'' to at the same time teach it ''quiet''.

I know my horse, I'm sure of my method, and horse people ''like you'' need to learn that there is nothing wrong you can teach a horse, you can just teach it the wrong way. I have friends with rearing horses that can rear, and back and stay, and be ridden without saddle or bridle, that doesn't rear all the time.

An if, just f, I get a problem with him not being able to tell the differenses, I'll train him out of it. If I fail, I have a skilled trainer by my side who can help me. But I really don't think any of that will be necessary.

And of course, if Ill ever sell that horse, which I doubt since I for one plan to keep him the rest of his life, and two won't sell a horse that got about 80% chance to end up tortured to death because of his breed. (Illegal slaughter transports, most standies ends up there even if the first seller are very careful on who they sell to. I rather put him down humanely. But I won't, since I'll keep him the rest of his life, if there's a will there's a way.)

I'll come back when he knows the trick and I don't have a problem with it :P
See you!
     
    02-05-2009, 04:55 PM
  #19
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zab    
If I make sure he knows wen to rear and when not to, why on earth should he suddenly start rearing when he's not supposed to?
Why on earth would he do such a thing? Well, lets see... because horses are unpredicatable. You can NEVER fully guarantee that your horse will won't rear when it is not on command. You can trust your horse with all your heart, but at the end of the day it is still an animal and could give a crap less about what happens to you. Their level of thinking will never be that the same of a human.

I am not trying to tell you what to do here, I am just pointing out a fact. Horses are horses, they are wonderful animals, but they are also just that, animals. They will always be unpredictable, and teaching a horse to rear you are only raising that level of risk. The people on here that told you they would not do it seem to realize this as well. Lets all keep in mind ignorance, is not bliss.
     
    02-05-2009, 07:26 PM
  #20
Super Moderator
I would like to add that it is very rare to get a horse that is so well disciplined that it only does the things that it is supposed to do on command. Those horses are out there, and they do exist but they are also very, very well trained.

Yes rearing is a natural thing for a horse to do, but so is bucking and you don't see people asking them to do that on command. And no, a piaf is much different. The spanish riding horses are very well trained, but they are trained and ridden by trainers constantly.

My consern is that you already have a horse that rears on the ground, I believe I read that he did that on his own and you slapped a command to it. Which means you had a problem that you've allowed to continue. Now, you are your own person and I can tell that you feel confident that you'll be able to do this w/out any issues. I hope you can. I'm not sure that training a horse to rear just so that you can say that he's one of the few that does it and doesnt have a problem because more then likely... he will.

Just my 2cents.
     

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