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Rearing horse brake?

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        07-08-2013, 04:16 PM
      #11
    Showing
    I agree palo, definitely a youngster.

    We all had that, 'I will magickly bond with this horsie and they will nevah hurt me!' idea when we were youngsters, but were quickly disillusioned when we were actually dealing with the flesh and blood animal.

    My concern is both for her and the horse. They're simply not a good match, and a noob youngster thinking she can 'love' a horse into behaving is dangerous. I don't want either of them getting hurt, but I can see it coming if her parents buy her this particular animal.
    smrobs likes this.
         
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        07-08-2013, 04:18 PM
      #12
    Green Broke
    You cannot stop a horse once it has reared, you just have to sit it out and hope they don't go over on you.

    Martingales will NOT stop a horse rearing.

    Please do not take on a project horse untill you are far far more advanced, A riding school will NOT teach you to control a dangerous horse.

    Make no mistake a rearing horse is very very dangerous, it has the potential to kill you. Having a horse come over ontop of you can break your pelvis, your femoral artery runs through the pelvis if you sever or tear the femoral artery you will be dead in under 3 mins and no one will be able to help you.
    If you don't tear the femoral artery, a horse coming over on you has a high likelyhood of breaking your spine which will paralyse you.

    Even if you don't break your back a fractured pelvis is 6 months in a hospital bed absolutly stationary and then years before you can walk properly if ever.

    I've been riding for 25+ years, I take on serious project horses that have major issues (see my Reeco posts). I take falls, I've been hurt, I will sit on a bucker, a bolter and a horse that is trying to turn itself inside out but I will NOT sit on a rearer.
    I also would never expect a horse to rear whilst you are getting to know each other.
         
        07-08-2013, 04:19 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hybridmustang    
    i guess I came to the wrong place for advice this mare is really sweet she's stressed because she doesnt have alot of grass its not that she doesnt like me believe me if she didnt like me she wouldnt even come near me I just wanted to know how to stop a horse while their rearing I may not be experienced that much the most I know is a trot but id like to know more ill just go to a riding school im sure they'll start me out with basics thanks everyone
    No, you came to the right place. You just don't like the answers you are getting. There is more experience on here than one can handle. Professionals, long time "back yarders", breeders, amateurs, showman, trail riders, and just those who like to learn about horses.

    There are several people here who started not knowing a thing, and after awhile have learned some valuable advice and experience of their own. We ALL will tell you the same thing....
    YOU ARE IN NO WAY, SHAPE, FORM, OR ANY STRETCH OF THE IMAGINATION PREPARED FOR A HORSE LIKE THIS. PERIOD.

    And that's putting it nicely.
         
        07-08-2013, 04:21 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by palogal    
    Do you realize that most horses don't rear?
    If she's a nice horse, and she was recommended for you by an instructor or a professional, chances are she will most likely not rear. Trust your trainer to choose a horse for you that's appropriate for your level. Learning to ride is a wonderful thing. Find a horse that will teach you properly.
    well I only had one rear at me and it was a colt but I wasnt on his back and so I don't know this mare she doesnt spook so im told by the owner who rode her she's tolerant just stressed by haven little food because she obviously loves to eat we took her out and she wouldnt stop eating long enough for me to groom her i've studied horses since I was five I just have never owned one and I took a few lessons but they only lasted long enough to learn how to trot :/ im going to look into riding school and im not a kid im 22 years old im just kind of new to the whole buying a horse scene and I have about over 25 books on horse moods and riding but I can't find anything that says if they rear this is what you should do. I wasnt saying they all rear I was just thinking of the what ifs you know ... but its fine ill just go read my books im sure that im just missing the answer somewhere. Im not even going ot ride her until we fully know eachother and I know riding is also included in getting to know one another but at the same time I could be training her and stuff while im learning at a riding school.
         
        07-08-2013, 04:23 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faye    
    you cannot stop a horse once it has reared, you just have to sit it out and hope they don't go over on you.

    Martingales will NOT stop a horse rearing.

    Please do not take on a project horse untill you are far far more advanced, A riding school will NOT teach you to control a dangerous horse.

    Make no mistake a rearing horse is very very dangerous, it has the potential to kill you. Having a horse come over ontop of you can break your pelvis, your femoral artery runs through the pelvis if you sever or tear the femoral artery you will be dead in under 3 mins and no one will be able to help you.
    If you don't tear the femoral artery, a horse coming over on you has a high likelyhood of breaking your spine which will paralyse you.

    Even if you don't break your back a fractured pelvis is 6 months in a hospital bed absolutly stationary and then years before you can walk properly if ever.

    I've been riding for 25+ years, I take on serious project horses that have major issues (see my Reeco posts). I take falls, I've been hurt, I will sit on a bucker, a bolter and a horse that is trying to turn itself inside out but I will NOT sit on a rearer.
    I also would never expect a horse to rear whilst you are getting to know each other.
    okay thanks that's all I was looking for really the mare im getting she hasnt been known to rear so the owner told me. I just was wondering and thinking of the what ifs. But now I know that you just gotta sit it out ill remember that I know to hold on to the horn of the saddle if the horse rears to stay on that much I do know.
         
        07-08-2013, 04:23 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    Your posts would be much easier to read if you used punctuation in the correct places. It is hard to take someone seriously if they don't take the time to type something out with a bit of thought and courtesy to others.
         
        07-08-2013, 04:24 PM
      #17
    Yearling
    Books can only teach you so much, the hands on practical horsemanship is what's going to help you succeed.

    I doubt you could read a book and successfully do heart surgery, or fly a jet. Horse training is a skill, and a hard one to learn at that. Not something you can learn from a book.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    smrobs, AlexS and DimSum like this.
         
        07-08-2013, 04:27 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    I hae 25 books on horses sitting next to my loo let alone in the rest of the house.
    I'll let you in on a secret - HORSES don't READ BOOKS.

    You can't learn horsemanship from a book, you need hands on experiance. You are in no way shape or form ready for a normal horse let alone a problem horse.

    Horses don't rear because they want food.

    I don't care how little grass she has had, my lad spent 6 months locked in a stable it would have never have crossed his mind to rear afterwards.
    Palomine likes this.
         
        07-08-2013, 04:28 PM
      #19
    Showing
    You're not missing the answer because there isn't one in all of your precious books.

    Go and take lessons from a reputable trainer. Learn all you can, and then keep on learning. Once you've gotten to the point you can walk, trot, canter, hand gallop and gallop on your own, then you might think about leasing or even buying a nice, quiet, uncomplicated horse with no major issues.

    You can't learn everything you need to out of books. Hands on experience is the only way.

    After 30 plus years of owning horses, even though I know I'm pretty good at handling and riding them, there will always be someone who's better and will know more. I also won't willingly take on a rearer. They're more dangerous than a bucker, and will get you killed.
         
        07-08-2013, 04:28 PM
      #20
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GamingGrrl    
    Books can only teach you so much, the hands on practical horsemanship is what's going to help you succeed.

    I doubt you could read a book and successfully do heart surgery, or fly a jet. Horse training is a skill, and a hard one to learn at that. Not something you can learn from a book.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    well yeah I know that it just gives me a bit of a sense that's all. But I already got the advice i've been wanting which is you can not stop a horse when it rears just sit it out and hope it don't fall on you. So yeah thanks to the person for answering this question POST CLOSED
         

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