Rearing at me!?
 
 

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Rearing at me!?

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        02-13-2014, 04:20 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Exclamation Rearing at me!?

    Okay so my 12hh welsh x is coming at me every time I lunge him and he rears and tries to hit me.

    The first time he did this, he actually struck me in the nose and I had a huge blood nose, it was painful >.<

    Now, my question is, how can I stop this behavior, I've tried a lot of different things, I seriously need help, he is a bit lazy under saddle and he a dream with tricks. (I don't let him come to close into my space)

    I've tried to desensitize him with the whip, but no, he still comes at me.

    My SECOND question is: can I put a flat piece of rope (tie down) on his halter and wrap it around his girth, I have done this once and it worked so well but I'm wondering, Is it the right thing to do? (I tighten it so he can't raise his head to much but he can move it down and side ways. Just not entirely up)

    Thanks!

    -TinyTurtles
         
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        02-13-2014, 04:30 AM
      #2
    Super Moderator
    The last thing I would want to do is to desensitize him to the whip!

    The moment he turned into me he would get that LUNGE whip wrapped around his front legs so hard it would sound like a pistol shot.
    If done correctly he would immediately spin away and I'd probably follow that with a crack behind him.

    You say he is good at learning tricks, I just hope you have not been silly enough to teach him to rear.

    A horse needs to respect the whip just as it needs to respect people. As a handler can get cross with misbehaviour and know that that person can frighten the heck out of them, so it has to learn that a whip can and will be used if there is misbehaviour. It doesn't make them afraid of the whip anymore than a human reprimand makes them afraid providing it is used at the correct time and with issue.
         
        02-13-2014, 04:37 AM
      #3
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
    The last thing I would want to do is to desensitize him to the whip!

    The moment he turned into me he would get that LUNGE whip wrapped around his front legs so hard it would sound like a pistol shot.
    If done correctly he would immediately spin away and I'd probably follow that with a crack behind him.

    You say he is good at learning tricks, I just hope you have not been silly enough to teach him to rear.

    A horse needs to respect the whip just as it needs to respect people. As a handler can get cross with misbehaviour and know that that person can frighten the heck out of them, so it has to learn that a whip can and will be used if there is misbehaviour. It doesn't make them afraid of the whip anymore than a human reprimand makes them afraid providing it is used at the correct time and with issue.
    He has no fear of the whip, I've tried cracking it at him but he doesn't react.
    And no, I haven't been teaching him how to rear! I don't really agree with the rearing tricks, I think it can cause bad behavior!
    Also, he comes at me fast. Like no reaction time fast, and yes it is a good sized lunge circle. When he does come in too, he pins his ears as much as he can, I can tell when he is about to come into the circle too, he pins tenses and rears. I don't back away though. As I know that can make them think they are boss!

    Thanks for the really quick response!
         
        02-13-2014, 04:46 AM
      #4
    Started
    Just a quick question here OP, can you describe how you lunge him? Has he always done this, does he lunge ok for other people? Things like that, just wondering if it could possibly be your lunging technique that is the issue, not saying it is, but would just like to rule that out before I tell you to wrap that whip round him so hard he jumps all 4 feet at once.

    I just ask because one of my horses will do this if she gets confused (granted she has had a less than fortunate past) she will actually lunge right at me, and has broken my foot by doing so in the past (struck at my head, I moved, she come crashing down on my foot instead, still count myself as lucky) I just find that when I lunge her I have to stay right back at her hip, if I hapen to shift my position anywhere infront of her hip, she immediately stops and turns, though will only rear and strike if I confuse her by crappy signals
         
        02-13-2014, 04:49 AM
      #5
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HollyBubbles    
    Just a quick question here OP, can you describe how you lunge him? Has he always done this, does he lunge ok for other people? Things like that, just wondering if it could possibly be your lunging technique that is the issue, not saying it is, but would just like to rule that out before I tell you to wrap that whip round him so hard he jumps all 4 feet at once.

    I just ask because one of my horses will do this if she gets confused (granted she has had a less than fortunate past) she will actually lunge right at me, and has broken my foot by doing so in the past (struck at my head, I moved, she come crashing down on my foot instead, still count myself as lucky) I just find that when I lunge her I have to stay right back at her hip, if I hapen to shift my position anywhere infront of her hip, she immediately stops and turns, though will only rear and strike if I confuse her by crappy signals
    I might be giving crappy signals he still pins his ears for my dad but doesn't come in. My dad is much bulkier looking and I'm smaller than him. Would that have conflict on anything?
         
        02-13-2014, 04:55 AM
      #6
    Started
    Does he lunge for a certain amount of time before he decides that it is a better idea to pin his ears and lunge himself towards you?
    Next time you lunge him, pay careful attention to your signals, where you are standing, how you hold your whip, or even better if possible, have somebody video you lunging him, with both you and the pony in the video so we might be able to see if it is a handling error.

    Have you had him for long? He might respect your dads size more than you, and if that happens to end up being the issue, you need to make yourself the biggest, scariest thing there, might look stupid but stand up tall, chin up, shoulders as broad as you can make them, chest puffed and arms wide, not tucked into your body, he needs to respect you, getting you in the nose with a hoof is definitely not allowed, you are very lucky he didn't do more damage than that.

    However I think if possible a video of you lunging him would be the most beneficial, it's always hard to give advice if we don't know whether it is the pony being a flat out brat, or if perhaps your giving conflicting signals and that is his reaction to confusion. When does he pin his ears?
         
        02-13-2014, 04:58 AM
      #7
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HollyBubbles    
    Does he lunge for a certain amount of time before he decides that it is a better idea to pin his ears and lunge himself towards you?
    Next time you lunge him, pay careful attention to your signals, where you are standing, how you hold your whip, or even better if possible, have somebody video you lunging him, with both you and the pony in the video so we might be able to see if it is a handling error.

    Have you had him for long? He might respect your dads size more than you, and if that happens to end up being the issue, you need to make yourself the biggest, scariest thing there, might look stupid but stand up tall, chin up, shoulders as broad as you can make them, chest puffed and arms wide, not tucked into your body, he needs to respect you, getting you in the nose with a hoof is definitely not allowed, you are very lucky he didn't do more damage than that.

    However I think if possible a video of you lunging him would be the most beneficial, it's always hard to give advice if we don't know whether it is the pony being a flat out brat, or if perhaps your giving conflicting signals and that is his reaction to confusion. When does he pin his ears?
    Usually straight away, I'll get onto the video ASAP.
         
        02-13-2014, 05:08 AM
      #8
    Started
    If it's straight away then I'm inclined to say maybe he hasn't been trained to lunge, or you may be confusing him with your signals, he may just be a very lunge-sensitive wee guy, but the video should tell when your able to get it
         
        02-13-2014, 05:13 AM
      #9
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HollyBubbles    
    If it's straight away then I'm inclined to say maybe he hasn't been trained to lunge, or you may be confusing him with your signals, he may just be a very lunge-sensitive wee guy, but the video should tell when your able to get it
    Well I got him from my Nan (a friend of my Nan broke him in) and as soon as I got him he was only just broken and been taking lessons with me (he was my FIRST ever horse and one of the horses I've ever ridden.)
    She said he wasn't broken properly and said that wasn't a problem with anything though so that gave me a hunk of confusion. I am confident but starting to think that he is lunge sensitive no matter what I try he keeps on coming

    Is it alright to use something to hold his head down? I did it once and I took it away and for a while he was okay until he started again?!
         
        02-13-2014, 05:32 AM
      #10
    Green Broke
    Personally, I'd beat the ever living daylights out of him when he turns in. But being that you said you can tell when he'll do it right before he does it, hit the whip off the ground THEN, don't wait until he's already coming at you.

    My mare tried this once with me..I hit her across the chest and front legs several times, then her side because she refused to turn and go where I asked, and then her behind when she wouldn't move at the appropriate speed. She then followed me around like a lost puppy, with her front and left side covered in whip marks. She'll still pin her ears ans swish her tail, but not once in the 6 months prior to that has she ever turned in and lunged at me.

    There's no point in holding his head down, it won't fix anything. If a horse is bound and determined to rear, it will do it, regardless of if you put a tie-down on it or not.

    But all in all..I'd suggest a trainer for this one. You aren't all that experienced, you aren't bigger than the pony, and this is a very dangerous habit/reaction on the pony's part.
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