Rearing problem (& my frist fall off Maia!) - Page 3
 
 

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Rearing problem (& my frist fall off Maia!)

This is a discussion on Rearing problem (& my frist fall off Maia!) within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        05-06-2008, 10:48 AM
      #21
    Foal
    I have always heard and used the pulling the head around to your knee. They don't like to go up with their head off balanced. It has worked for me in the past. I would do some more ground work too.
         
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        05-06-2008, 12:40 PM
      #22
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by boonesar
    I have always heard and used the pulling the head around to your knee. They don't like to go up with their head off balanced. It has worked for me in the past. I would do some more ground work too.
    Haha I would have if I could have - unfortunately bareback wasn't possible... please see my update as well :)
         
        05-06-2008, 02:35 PM
      #23
    Super Moderator
    Boonser,

    That does work. I've done it, knocks them off balance and they actually drop down really quick, but you have to be careful because they get smart and when you lean forward to yank the reign, they'll swing opposite direction and you FLYYYYYYYY.... been there ... done that... teehee.... but you are right, it does work.
         
        05-06-2008, 04:17 PM
      #24
    Showing
    Haha I used to do that when my horse would buck. :) It works wonders!
         
        05-25-2008, 04:22 AM
      #25
    Foal
    rearing

    When you rode her again did you use the curb bit? Some horses (especially if they've never worn one) cannot handle the pressure of the curb on the roof of their mouth. The curb strap may have helped you as it prevents the curb from putting too much pressure on their mouth. I would suggest either trying again with the curb strap, or doing a bunch of ground work with the curb until she gets used to it.
         
        05-25-2008, 11:45 AM
      #26
    Showing
    Re: rearing

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dustytrailzz
    When you rode her again did you use the curb bit? Some horses (especially if they've never worn one) cannot handle the pressure of the curb on the roof of their mouth. The curb strap may have helped you as it prevents the curb from putting too much pressure on their mouth. I would suggest either trying again with the curb strap, or doing a bunch of ground work with the curb until she gets used to it.
    I had ridden her in it prior to that day and have used it since. I have really soft hands and made sure there was no pressure on the bit.
    Since the rearing fiasco I've been working on the canter in the saddle and have not had any problems at all. I suppose I should try bareback again and see what she does ;)
         
        05-25-2008, 03:28 PM
      #27
    Weanling
    If you do pull the horse in a circle when it rears, make sure to not pull too hard, and don't pull down and to the side. Horses follow their heads; they have to. If you pull the horse's head down, it could follow its head down a flip or fall. Pull it out and once it comes down from the rear, pull it around. This works for bolters and buckers too.
         
        05-26-2008, 12:41 AM
      #28
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amightytarzan5
    If you do pull the horse in a circle when it rears, make sure to not pull too hard, and don't pull down and to the side. Horses follow their heads; they have to. If you pull the horse's head down, it could follow its head down a flip or fall. Pull it out and once it comes down from the rear, pull it around. This works for bolters and buckers too.
    I know this all too well, and have given much the same advice to many people, but thank you.
    My problem is not with the rearing per se - I can ride it out, I've done it enough, it's more that I'm confused by the style of her rearing - when I asked her to canter (bareback) she'd take a few steps and then slam her forelegs into the ground and pop up; most horses get light in the front end then rear, they don't slam down then pop up.
    Honestly, it's almost like she was trained to do a "hi-ho Silver, away!" type rear rather than her rearing out of pain or fear.
    Strange... but that's my story.
         
        05-26-2008, 03:37 AM
      #29
    Weanling
    I had a similar case just yesterday with my yougster. She's green so I forgave her, but she'd decided that she couldn't canter. I'd get 3-4 strides and she'd start to jack up, then jerk to a stop and I could feel her front end wanting to lift, she never reared, but if she'd been that way inclined (she's more of a bucker than rearer) I know she would have. For her it was frustration/nerves, her little buddy was playing looney pony in the paddock and getting Faith all upset to the point where she couldn't concentrate, there was just too much going on.

    I'd say your girl was just uncertain about the whole bareback thing and seem as how she's been fine under saddle, perhaps she has a very sensitive back.
         

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