Rearing question
   

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Rearing question

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        03-28-2012, 10:43 AM
      #1
    Weanling
    Rearing question

    I got a new filly I am working on at the barn and she tends to be lifty and agressive. I had her broke to saddle and ride at 2 1/2 and she was untouched through the winter (about 3-4 months) I got her out to start doing a little work with her yesterday and she would rear on the long line and strike at me. She has always been light on the front end and would hop up on a ride. I have worked with many horses through the years and a few that were similar to her but with her the whole theory I have used through the years of make them work or back them up everytime they do a unwanted action isnt working because to do that I would be putting my self in under her. Backing her up isnt a option at all cause she goes sky high if you press her to hard. Now any other trainers out there want to share with me a good approach to handle this situation without intensifying it?
         
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        03-28-2012, 11:02 AM
      #2
    Foal
    I've never had to deal with this, but I heard a trainer describe how they handled it once... They said every time the horse would rear they would run at them and yell and scream like a crazy person, cracking whips or rustling plastic bags or whatever they had on them at the moment. Apparently the goal is to make them think they are going to die every time they rear haha They also said if they flip over backwards that's fine because they usually won't do it again... I don't know, it seems like a strange technique but I figured I'd at least pass it along!
         
        03-28-2012, 11:10 AM
      #3
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aggiegirl14    
    They also said if they flip over backwards that's fine because they usually won't do it again...

    If a horse flips over backwards and doesn't do it again, it's probably because he's crippled. The problem needs to be resolved wayyy before it gets to this point.
         
        03-28-2012, 11:20 AM
      #4
    Yearling
    I somewhat agree with the above poster. Whenever she rears make it dramatic and do almost anything to get her to go forward.

    I'm not a big fan of backing a horse up when they aren't listening. It puts strain on their legs and it can be very dangerous for you. If the horse decides all of a sudden that they want to spring forward or rear, you are directly in their way and you are going to get hurt. Another thing, my horse was trained with this method in mind, but every time she resisted they would back her up. She's got quite the hind end on her and a compact body so that's much easier for her than pushing up into the contact. So now, when she's pressured, she'll go flying backwards and when I'm on her, there's nothing I can do to get her to stop apart from steer her into a wall. She's figured out that if she doesn't want to do something she can back up and I can't do anything about it. Last time, she actually backed out of the arena and started panicking when she started sliding on the concrete. The only thing I could do was tell people to watch out, calm her down and walk her back in without getting off. I think she scared herself though, because she hasn't tried anything remotely close since.

    I hope all goes well with your mare.
         
        03-28-2012, 11:33 AM
      #5
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aggiegirl14    
    I've never had to deal with this, but I heard a trainer describe how they handled it once... They said every time the horse would rear they would run at them and yell and scream like a crazy person, cracking whips or rustling plastic bags or whatever they had on them at the moment. Apparently the goal is to make them think they are going to die every time they rear haha They also said if they flip over backwards that's fine because they usually won't do it again... I don't know, it seems like a strange technique but I figured I'd at least pass it along!
    I have heard several older trainers tell me when she rears and I am on her to try and flip her! Ha ha I don't think that would be a good idea just thought it was funny. I am not as worried about once I am on her because I know what to do then I just keep her moving or use a tie down... Problem is the rearing and striking when I have her on a line. She will do it anytime I put pressure on her.
         
        03-28-2012, 11:44 AM
      #6
    Trained
    To me this is easier to solve on the line, than in the saddle. I personally would be WAY more worried ON her. On the ground you can go at her and MAKE HER THINK SHE IS GOING TO DIE immediately, and without question, for a brief period of time. Use whatever you have to go at her loudly and in a really big way. I would make her move her feet and keep them moving after the "die" part is over. Sounds to me like you have not really thought this was such an issue and have half heartedly dealt with it in the past. Inconsistency is NOT what is needed here. Every time those feet come up she needs to know, without question, that is NOT acceptable. No if, ands, or buts about it. Whether you are on her or not.
    I would never, ever pull back on a horse who is trying to go up. Backing up is moving in the wrong direction. Turn her to disengage her and MOVE HER FORWARD.

    I am NOT a trainer, but this is pretty common knowledge, at least I would think.
    Kayty, sillyhorses and FaydesMom like this.
         
        03-28-2012, 11:51 AM
      #7
    Weanling
    When I was speaking earlier of backing up I was really talking about how I have handled unwanted actions in the past..... on other horses.. And yes it is common knowledge to get a horse standing on its rear to move forward ( they are already in reverse really on the rear) so With a horse standing and striking I should just stand bigger and get her to move forward. Makes sense no worries. I will give her a go this evening and see how she reacts to that. I will make sure I have a good whip with me for the charge as well. And in the saddle a horse can't rear if you keep him moving forward and his mind busy maybe I am just more comfortable in saddle idk just how it is for me.
    flyingchange1991 likes this.
         
        03-28-2012, 12:35 PM
      #8
    Yearling
    Another thing, if you're on the line then don't be afraid to move towards her if she rears. I found that making a commotion and going towards their flank area really encourages them to go forward because that is just what most predators would do and their instincts will tell them they need to get moving.
    franknbeans likes this.
         
        03-28-2012, 01:15 PM
      #9
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Arksly    
    Another thing, if you're on the line then don't be afraid to move towards her if she rears. I found that making a commotion and going towards their flank area really encourages them to go forward because that is just what most predators would do and their instincts will tell them they need to get moving.

    Sounds like a plan, we will see how she acts today when I do this. Wonder if I should leave her on the line or out in the round pen? Since the problem is on the line I would think the only logical thing to do would be put her on the line and try and correct it. She wasnt like this when I worked with her as a 2 1/2 year old probably just a respect issue she has come up with since she hasnt been handled much.
         
        03-28-2012, 02:20 PM
      #10
    Weanling
    I don't agree with backing up a rearer as a correction for 2 reasons. #1 they rear because they do not want to go forward for whatever reason and #2 because backing them up makes it easier for them to keep all of their weight onto their hindquarters which makes rearing easier for them to do.

    I agree with franknbeans, turning to disengage the hindquarters and get them going forwards. If you happen to be riding when they go up, keep your hands low and bring one rein away from the horse's neck in the direction you want to turn your horse, look in the direction you are aiming for and be determined and really use your inside leg to try and turn your horse around. Once you get them back down get them going forwards immediately. Never pull back or lean back, you could end up pulling the horse over on top of you.
         

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