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Rearing question

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        03-28-2012, 03:09 PM
      #11
    Started
    This horse has no respect for you, hence the rearing on the line and striking. Whether or not she is also exhibiting this in other areas, only you know, but make no mistake, you are not dominant over her at all. It may be that you have never had much dominance over any of the horses you have worked with, or it could be that they have been horses more easily intimidated, either is possible.

    Be aware too, that with this particular horse, more than any other, any evidence you give that you are beneath her is duly noted and file away. Timidity in leading, haltering, grooming, or what have you will only add to this type of thing.

    The feed she is getting, if grained/hayed could also be adding to this, and might need to be reassessed to see if that helps somewhat.

    And am not quite sure if by "long-lining" you are trying to drive her from the ground, as to me that is long lining, or if you are lunging her in a circle. Under either circumstances, no horse should be close enough to you for them to consider striking, and are you that close?

    Or is she just coming up to express her displeasure at what you are doing, and a safe distance away from you? Either way, she is in dire need of a come to Jesus meeting, and one in which there is no doubt in either of your minds who has won.

    And does she really have any inkling as to what you are wanting her to do? How did you start her on it? When you say she is light on a ride? How much has she been ridden, if any?

    IF she has been ridden and this is showing up there, you need to bring her down, the best and easiest way to do it is to pop her between ears with warm egg, and ignore her after that. She comes up, pop, down she goes, and you continue on. No talking about it, just go on about business.

    I also would suggest thorough vet check/dental too first. But really feel it is your mechanics and this mare's mindset that is the problem here.

    If she rears and strikes on lunge line, tear her rear up with 12 ft lash whip, or can use a cane pole. And I don't mean beat on her, but make it imperative that she go forward at your direction. Any display of displeasure on her part, results in another tap on rear.

    Again, you need to evaluate your handling of this mare elsewhere, as rarely is one showing signs of this without it occurring at other times.
    themacpack and palominolover like this.
         
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        03-28-2012, 03:14 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    I would just like to add, if you didn't "catch" the rear quick enough and they are already standing straight up, I don't think that I would suggest doing what I wrote above, the best thing to do would be to reach forward and rest your hands low along side the neck, keep your weight forward and when they come down get them moving forwards immediately.
    themacpack likes this.
         
        03-28-2012, 03:53 PM
      #13
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Palomine    
    This horse has no respect for you, hence the rearing on the line and striking. Whether or not she is also exhibiting this in other areas, only you know, but make no mistake, you are not dominant over her at all. It may be that you have never had much dominance over any of the horses you have worked with, or it could be that they have been horses more easily intimidated, either is possible.

    Be aware too, that with this particular horse, more than any other, any evidence you give that you are beneath her is duly noted and file away. Timidity in leading, haltering, grooming, or what have you will only add to this type of thing.

    The feed she is getting, if grained/hayed could also be adding to this, and might need to be reassessed to see if that helps somewhat.

    And am not quite sure if by "long-lining" you are trying to drive her from the ground, as to me that is long lining, or if you are lunging her in a circle. Under either circumstances, no horse should be close enough to you for them to consider striking, and are you that close?

    Or is she just coming up to express her displeasure at what you are doing, and a safe distance away from you? Either way, she is in dire need of a come to Jesus meeting, and one in which there is no doubt in either of your minds who has won.

    And does she really have any inkling as to what you are wanting her to do? How did you start her on it? When you say she is light on a ride? How much has she been ridden, if any?

    IF she has been ridden and this is showing up there, you need to bring her down, the best and easiest way to do it is to pop her between ears with warm egg, and ignore her after that. She comes up, pop, down she goes, and you continue on. No talking about it, just go on about business.

    I also would suggest thorough vet check/dental too first. But really feel it is your mechanics and this mare's mindset that is the problem here.

    If she rears and strikes on lunge line, tear her rear up with 12 ft lash whip, or can use a cane pole. And I don't mean beat on her, but make it imperative that she go forward at your direction. Any display of displeasure on her part, results in another tap on rear.

    Again, you need to evaluate your handling of this mare elsewhere, as rarely is one showing signs of this without it occurring at other times.


    First of all who are you to come into the thread posted by me and insult me by acting as if I have never had any dominance over any of my horses? I have been training horses for 7 years and have worked with plenty of horses and have had no issue in getting anything done with them. From mustangs to TWH I have worked with a large variety of breeds and no issues. Just havent had to deal with one acting like this mare has. And what in the world is everyone keep saying about backing her up? I clearly said in my first post that this wasnt a option like I had used it for on my other horses. Now I really have no need or reason to prove myself to you at all and really don't care to just trying to get the point across that handling the horse isnt being done wrong and is being done correctly and the same way I have handled 30+ other colts I have started in the past. Simply was looking for a answer from a person who might have had a similar problem.
         
        03-28-2012, 04:14 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    I see what you mean, you did say that backing up was not something that you choose to do with her. I think the main thing with her is to watch her for all signs of her even starting to think backwards whenever you are handling her and when you notice it get her thinking forwards. The issue really isn't the rearing the issue is she is not a very forward thinking mare by the sounds of it.
    Wallee likes this.
         
        03-28-2012, 04:23 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HorsesAreMyPassion    
    I see what you mean, you did say that backing up was not something that you choose to do with her. I think the main thing with her is to watch her for all signs of her even starting to think backwards whenever you are handling her and when you notice it get her thinking forwards. The issue really isn't the rearing the issue is she is not a very forward thinking mare by the sounds of it.

    Thank you for the info! Now that is what I am searching for tips on correcting the issue not someone acting as if I don't know what I am doing...
         
        03-28-2012, 06:01 PM
      #16
    Started
    Truthfully, I didn't see one person bashing you about your training ability or whatever. I will say, that if someone saying that she's dominant over you and you haven't gotten it into her head clear as day that you are dominant, you have some confidence issues.

    As for the rearing. The first horse I retrained was a gelding that reared when any lateral movement was asked for (not by me originally, by the BO who was trying to retrain him), he was asked to back, you asked him to go down a hill, you asked him to step over a creek, etc. He never reared on the ground, so I had no option but to fix his ground manners and hop on and start asking for things that made him rear, as he should have understood what I was asking for at that point. Every time he went up, I yanked to one side to get him off balance before he got a chance to get much farther than a few inches off and push him into a nice working trot for the next 5-10 minutes. I did this for about 2 months (once a week) with different things that made him go up (and I continuously found more circumstances where he would get light on his front end and want to go straight up). After about 2 months of that, the next two months was all about getting him to respond to cues without a second thought.

    I did a lot of work on that horse in 5 months, and he ended up going lame and his owner moved to another property. I don't miss working with him, because I know that I'll be doing the same thing for a living and swapping horses around every few months. If I had another chance to retrain a rearer and continue them on to becoming a successful show horse, I'd jump on the chance, which is the complete opposite to what many trainers believe.

    Now, with the intimidation aspect of running and scaring the living daylights out of them when they rear, I'd be careful with that. I didn't go that route because this gelding was known to kick at anything coming up behind him too fast that was loud, and I know that I, personally, flinch when I see hooves flying towards me, even if they're not close enough to come into contact. If you have any inkling that the horse will kick at you flying up at their hind, I would suggest not even going that route, because it's viewed as something that shows you aren't sure enough about your dominance, like someone else mentioned, without elaborating on what I just stated.

    I wish you well with this horse and hope you can sort out her issue with whatever technique works for you.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    palominolover likes this.
         
        03-28-2012, 07:24 PM
      #17
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wallee    
    First of all who are you to come into the thread posted by me and insult me by acting as if I have never had any dominance over any of my horses? I have been training horses for 7 years and have worked with plenty of horses and have had no issue in getting anything done with them. From mustangs to TWH I have worked with a large variety of breeds and no issues. Just havent had to deal with one acting like this mare has. And what in the world is everyone keep saying about backing her up? I clearly said in my first post that this wasnt a option like I had used it for on my other horses. Now I really have no need or reason to prove myself to you at all and really don't care to just trying to get the point across that handling the horse isnt being done wrong and is being done correctly and the same way I have handled 30+ other colts I have started in the past. Simply was looking for a answer from a person who might have had a similar problem.
    Noone is bashing you. Obviously there is an issue, and usually an issue with a horse starts with the person handling it and their ability to do so. Just a fact.

    I did see that you did not think backing was an option in this case-I personally would not do that with ANY horse that rears. Just doesn't make sense. From everything I know it is more apt to make any horse who is light in front go up.

    As far as all you have done-that is all well and good, but with all due respect, 7 years is not all that much and each horse is different. THey will each test your skills in a new way, and you need to have lots of "tools" to deal with each one. You will NEVER stop learning. If you think you know it all-time to quit, because the next horse will be out to prove you wrong.

    Good luck.
         
        03-28-2012, 07:28 PM
      #18
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Iseul    
    Truthfully, I didn't see one person bashing you about your training ability or whatever. I will say, that if someone saying that she's dominant over you and you haven't gotten it into her head clear as day that you are dominant, you have some confidence issues.

    As for the rearing. The first horse I retrained was a gelding that reared when any lateral movement was asked for (not by me originally, by the BO who was trying to retrain him), he was asked to back, you asked him to go down a hill, you asked him to step over a creek, etc. He never reared on the ground, so I had no option but to fix his ground manners and hop on and start asking for things that made him rear, as he should have understood what I was asking for at that point. Every time he went up, I yanked to one side to get him off balance before he got a chance to get much farther than a few inches off and push him into a nice working trot for the next 5-10 minutes. I did this for about 2 months (once a week) with different things that made him go up (and I continuously found more circumstances where he would get light on his front end and want to go straight up). After about 2 months of that, the next two months was all about getting him to respond to cues without a second thought.

    I did a lot of work on that horse in 5 months, and he ended up going lame and his owner moved to another property. I don't miss working with him, because I know that I'll be doing the same thing for a living and swapping horses around every few months. If I had another chance to retrain a rearer and continue them on to becoming a successful show horse, I'd jump on the chance, which is the complete opposite to what many trainers believe.

    Now, with the intimidation aspect of running and scaring the living daylights out of them when they rear, I'd be careful with that. I didn't go that route because this gelding was known to kick at anything coming up behind him too fast that was loud, and I know that I, personally, flinch when I see hooves flying towards me, even if they're not close enough to come into contact. If you have any inkling that the horse will kick at you flying up at their hind, I would suggest not even going that route, because it's viewed as something that shows you aren't sure enough about your dominance, like someone else mentioned, without elaborating on what I just stated.

    I wish you well with this horse and hope you can sort out her issue with whatever technique works for you.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Not sure where you got the running up behind stuff-That would be stupid to do, now wouldn't it? Tapping with a whip or getting after a horse does not usually involve running up behind where you can get kicked.
    Kayty likes this.
         
        03-28-2012, 07:58 PM
      #19
    uii
    Foal
    Does she do this when you are grooming her, or leading by hand? If it's just when you're working, her, maybe she had a bad experience in the past?
         
        03-28-2012, 08:06 PM
      #20
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by uii    
    Does she do this when you are grooming her, or leading by hand? If it's just when you're working, her, maybe she had a bad experience in the past?
    Re read and you will find your answer.
         

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