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Rearing question

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  • My horse is challenging me while lunging
  • Weanling rears

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    03-28-2012, 09:11 PM
  #21
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans    
Not sure where you got the running up behind stuff-That would be stupid to do, now wouldn't it? Tapping with a whip or getting after a horse does not usually involve running up behind where you can get kicked.
Like I attempted to explain, not running right up behind them. Clearly, that is a stupid idea and not what I was trying to say to do in the least. Someone mentioned something along the lines of "acting like a predator" to get them moving, and moving quick at that. What I was trying to explain was (which I clearly didn't do well enough, I apologize) that regardless of the fact that you aren't in kicking range, the initial response to a kick is for us to flinch/move backwards/stop (at least everyone I know reacts this way).

But I will say, if I hit Lucky with the whip while I was lunging her, she'd purpously try to come at me backwards kicking (which I did whack the hell out of her whole hind), but we didn't normally need to get to that point. I was just saying from experience, that if I were to try to get at or hit Lucky with the whip, I has better be in front of her to avoid her hooves. But then again, she was the one with the kicking problem, not the rearing one.
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    03-28-2012, 09:15 PM
  #22
Trained
And the rearing with striking is almost as bad as the kicking. Either way-you need a good lunge whip. Certainly a "carrot stick" will not suffice for this, IMO.
     
    03-28-2012, 10:31 PM
  #23
Trained
I have heard several remedies for rearing...above mentioned was the egg trick or a water balloon. Never tried it, I thought it was more of a trick rather than fixing the real issue. It was supposed to make the horse think he hit his head and the egg was blood running down his face. Correct me if I am wrong...but always wanted to try it..lol

I have both seen and done the pulling a horse down from a rear and sitting on its neck. I do not recommend this method for someone that has never had experience doing it. It is a fast way to hurt yourself or a horse if not done correctly. It has worked for the times used and seen done. It is a method for getting a horse to switch from reacting to thinking.

Another thing to consider is why the horse is rearing. Until you understand the problem and what is causing it, it will be difficult to solve the issue. Like spanking a horse that bucks from a pinching saddle....does no good, he is trying to tell you something. However since she is rearing and striking at you on the lunge line, it does sound like one or some the above- disrespect, challenging behaviour, over stimulus, confusion and/or lack of forward movement(yep that really narrows it down..lol)...hard to say with out seeing the horse in action.

Backing a horse as a punishment has never been my choice personally, whether it be for rearing or whatever. The only time I use it is for a horse that leaks out of a stop. But that is my method and my choice. I have seen it over used and had seen horses get scared when they have known they did wrong and started running backwards out of reaction and end up flipping over backwards. Obviously you are not doing this for a rearing horse and it will not work to you or the horses advantage to solve the issue. But mentioning it may spook some folks. Especially for me, I would just assume a horse try to run off and or buck me off than rear and possibly flip over backwards.

Best of luck!
HorsesAreMyPassion likes this.
     
    03-28-2012, 11:33 PM
  #24
Weanling
Yeah thanks for the tips and I worked her today and focused on forward movement and it seemed to work well. She has been sacked out well and can touch her anywhere and has had ropes all over her. She just still seems to really hate a rope on her face... Now I did leave a tid bit of history out on this filly to you guys. She was snake bitten in under her jaw is the reason her training was postponed in the fall/winter. Had a vet out and checked and all that at the time of the bite and was all treated and is healed now.... But in the back of my mind I keep wandering if this is what is causing these behavioral issues (she has never acted the same as she did before the bite). What does everyone think on the bite? Think it might be the underlying problem or would you rule it out?
     
    03-29-2012, 08:40 PM
  #25
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallee    
She just still seems to really hate a rope on her face... Now I did leave a tid bit of history out on this filly to you guys. She was snake bitten in under her jaw is the reason her training was postponed in the fall/winter. .. But in the back of my mind I keep wandering if this is what is causing these behavioral issues (she has never acted the same as she did before the bite). What does everyone think on the bite? Think it might be the underlying problem or would you rule it out?
It's nagging at you, check it out.
Horse's have a long memory and if this snake bite was traumatic for her she may very well be reacting to the line as though it were another snake and not actually rearing at you at all. Couple that with her natural penchant for rearing and it's a very likely reaction from her. Of course she can't very well write down her fears and anxieties, she can only act them out. If this is the case go back to the situation where she rears and watch her very closely *from a safe distance. Watch to see what signals she is giving just before she lifts off. Is she scared or is she defiant? Is it dominance and respect or is it fear and panic? Once you can figure out why she is doing what she's doing you'll be able to figure out how to fix it.
sillyhorses and Wallee like this.
     
    03-30-2012, 01:22 AM
  #26
Weanling
Thanks for the reply, sounds like a intelligent way to go at it.
     
    03-30-2012, 01:53 AM
  #27
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
Backing a horse as a punishment has never been my choice personally, whether it be for rearing or whatever....I have seen it over used and had seen horses get scared when they have known they did wrong and started running backwards out of reaction and end up flipping over backwards.
This is the problem with my mare. It hasn't lead to flipping over yet but as soon as she gets freaked out or is pressured she goes flying backwards and won't stop until she hits something. It's quite terrifying really because when I'm on her I'm completely powerless because I can't get her to stop unless someone is there to help me.
     
    03-30-2012, 02:46 AM
  #28
Super Moderator
As a mere slip of a girl, I had a big young three year old horse come to where I was working as an emergency. The owner had been critically hurt (her head smashed in) but no one knew what had happened only that she had been working the horse.

When I went to lunge him he was fantastic for a few circuits and then reared and came in at me on his hind legs striking out with the front.

It was one of those moments when the brain thinks at nano speed. My first thought was "This is how she got smashed up!" The second was "What would my boss do?"
I immediately moved so I was at his side and used the lunge whip across his belly. He came down but got his head away from me and charged off across the field - which led to other problems, but he never reared at me again.

A horse that rears when being ridden will cause me to do nothing. I will just sit on them. When they go up I will do all the normal of leaning well forward but I will not hit them, boot them or get someone to chase them. I will just sit on them keeping them facing the right direction.
Rearing takes a lot more effort than sitting and generally speaking most horses do it to frighten the rider. I sit them out. When they realise that they are getting no reaction they will want to go forward but I will not let them. I will make them wait a few minutes and then I will ask them to go on my terms.

If a horse rears when I am leading it then I will carry a length of hosepipe and that, when they go up, will be wrapped around their back legs hard. Again I will ensure that I have a long rope to keep me out of front leg range so I will be to the side, and attack their only means of support. They do not like it and if caught quickly they soon stop.

I have had dealings with many young horses and some have gone to the point of no return and if they have gone over them I will be fast to get to their heads so they cannot get up. I will hold them down and only let them up when they have totally relaxed. Then when they are up I will continue as if nothing has happened.
Wallee likes this.
     
    03-30-2012, 10:55 AM
  #29
Weanling
IN the past I have worked with on other rearer and she did it while under saddle. No worries under saddle though my method there is to apply pressure to the back of the neck as if pushing them down and then move out, has worked for me before to stop them. I totally agree with the above post horses I believe as well are doing it to intimidate. When riding best way to stop it is be casual and get their mind going in another direction.
     
    03-30-2012, 05:11 PM
  #30
Weanling
I'm sorry. Haven't read the whole thread. Just wanted to say for other reading this who don't know better that you certainly don't want to flip the horse with yo on her. Talk about a good way to get your neck broken.

As for flipping on purpose from the ground, all I have to say to that is that my coming four year old did that a few weeks ago on the lunge - not on purpose, but because he decided to be stupid. He'd been threatening it for a while under saddle, so it was not unexpected. At 17 hands, he is a very big boy and he landed hard. He has been lame since - basically because everything from his withers to his hip went out on the side he landed on. And he was sore from the saddle. I'm lucky he didn't destroy the brand new saddle he was wearing at the time.

After a $165 visit from the chiropractor, daily ice massages for the past week and then slowly bringing him back into work with w/t only, he is now at about 85%. I probably have a couple more weeks of that, a couple follow-up massages and a possible follow-up chiro visit to go to get him back to where he was before the flip.

Obviously, I hope he "learned his lesson," but I would not ever have purposely caused that to happen. Flipping your horse is a very dangerous and potentially costly way to teach them not to rear. And frankly, I'm not convinced that it works.
     

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