rearing while leading?
   

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rearing while leading?

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  • Stop stalion from rearing while leading
  • Horse rearing when leading him

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    08-01-2013, 11:02 PM
  #1
Yearling
rearing while leading?

While I was leading my 2 - year - old gelding from the pasture to his drylot today, he suddenly reared. He wasnt spooked or anything and I was just calmly leading him, no pulling or jerking. It really surprised me and the leadrope slipped in my hands but I managed to hold on to the end. I was leading him in a well fitting nylon halter. He was really calm after he reared but was rushing in front of me and when I asked him to back up, he just reared again. What should I do about it. He usually NEVER rears.
Thanks.
     
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    08-02-2013, 03:22 PM
  #2
Green Broke
He has decided he does not have to pay attention to you more than likely.

Feeling good, wanting to get loose, or whatever, he is showing you that he needs to be walked with more control, more awareness of what he is doing.
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    08-02-2013, 04:24 PM
  #3
Showing
Aaah, he's testing you. When a horse rears I like to pull them on a 45*angle to it's body. It pulls it off balance and sometimes puts a scare into it.
     
    08-02-2013, 04:30 PM
  #4
Weanling
Hes testing you and if you let him get away with it, it will get worse. I suggest you carry a lunge whip with you that has the string cut off so every time he rears you just take the whip and wiggle it back and forth by his rear legs while you are facing him. Not to hurt him and don't do it forcefully but he wont like it and will eventually stop rearing if you are consistent.
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    08-02-2013, 05:27 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by LouieThePalomino    
hes testing you and if you let him get away with it, it will get worse. I suggest you carry a lunge whip with you that has the string cut off so every time he rears you just take the whip and wiggle it back and forth by his rear legs while you are facing him. Not to hurt him and don't do it forcefully but he wont like it and will eventually stop rearing if you are consistent.
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the problem is, he doesnt misbehave if he sees the whip. And I can't always carry a whip with me.
     
    08-02-2013, 05:45 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by horsecrazygirl13    
the problem is, he doesnt misbehave if he sees the whip. And I can't always carry a whip with me.
If you form the habit of behaving well by carrying the whip when handling (even if you don't have to use it) it will be less likely for him to form the habit if rearing while being led. My point is, I guess, that if he behaves when you carry a whip, it doesn't hurt to carry one. At this age, you are looking to form good habits and if carrying a whip maintains that, then great.

Otherwise, the 45 degree angle to bring him back down immediately could work well. Its hard to tell what correction will be too much or too little for a horse without really knowing him...

For instance, my oldenburg/arab gelding is super sensitive and a whip correction would make things worse with him (sending him into a panic). The gelding by my paint stallion was a thick headed dunderhead until he matured and he took stronger corrections (he also tested boundaries more).

Knowing more about your guy's personality/sensitivity and training history might make for a little more accurate advice... Just because I see two bits of advice in here that could be useful for the right horse, but might also be the wrong response for the wrong horse.

I hope I made some bit of sense ;)
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    08-02-2013, 10:25 PM
  #7
Weanling
I like the 45* pull. Also, as rearing is a forward motion issue either while riding or leading, it would be a great chance to reinforce the importance of forward motion. If you horse is good at lunging, I would do a few good circles to get his attention. This is a young horse and this kind of behavior is not unheard of so I wouldn't make a BIG deal out of it YET. A small fix now will save you a big fix later.
     
    08-03-2013, 01:21 AM
  #8
Super Moderator
I do not like the 45 angle as you are pulling the horse towards you and a horse vertical is often waving its legs to keep balance so this can be dangerous to the uninitiated.
First off, I would tell you to wear a helmet. Carry a piece of plastic water pipe pr a strong whip. It is possible to carry this at all times when leading him, you have to collect his halter when he is turned out so collect a whip at the same time and leave it with the halter.
Use a long rope and when he rears whack him really hard across the hind legs. You are attacking his only means of support and he will not like that!
Stop it before it becomes something more serious.
     
    08-03-2013, 01:30 AM
  #9
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
I do not like the 45 angle as you are pulling the horse towards you and a horse vertical is often waving its legs to keep balance so this can be dangerous to the uninitiated.
First off, I would tell you to wear a helmet. Carry a piece of plastic water pipe pr a strong whip. It is possible to carry this at all times when leading him, you have to collect his halter when he is turned out so collect a whip at the same time and leave it with the halter.
Use a long rope and when he rears whack him really hard across the hind legs. You are attacking his only means of support and he will not like that!
Stop it before it becomes something more serious.
Well, lets face it, it's going to be dangerous. 45*, pipe to the hinds, or forcing over. It's not fun, not for rookies, and dangerous.
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    08-03-2013, 07:21 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
I do not like the 45 angle as you are pulling the horse towards you and a horse vertical is often waving its legs to keep balance so this can be dangerous to the uninitiated.
First off, I would tell you to wear a helmet. Carry a piece of plastic water pipe pr a strong whip. It is possible to carry this at all times when leading him, you have to collect his halter when he is turned out so collect a whip at the same time and leave it with the halter.
Use a long rope and when he rears whack him really hard across the hind legs. You are attacking his only means of support and he will not like that!
Stop it before it becomes something more serious.

I will reiterate that the level of response is very particular to the horse and his sensitivity. All methods mentioned can have merit, but the wrong one on the wrong horse will create more problems.

I agree that rearing is dangerous (especially in hand), a helmet is a very good idea, and any training method to overcome rearing will have inherent risks. Timing and method are very important and may have to be determined on the fly, so experience in training is very important.
     

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