reprimanding a horse for not listening to your voice cue?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

reprimanding a horse for not listening to your voice cue?

This is a discussion on reprimanding a horse for not listening to your voice cue? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to get your horse to lisen to voice
  • Listening to your cue

Like Tree6Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-13-2012, 11:35 AM
  #1
Foal
reprimanding a horse for not listening to your voice cue?

How do you reprimand a horse for ignoring your voice cue? My pony, when lunging, will sometimes ignore my voice cues. Do you shorten the lunge line, do you give it a tug? What is it that you do to get the horse to listen ? I admit to sometimes repeating myself.. and I know that is a no-no.

Sometimes he does very well with listening to my voice cues. He will respond almost immediately. But then other times he will totally ignore them, a big one he ignores is "whoa" when I want a downward transition.
Thank you.

Also is it wrong to use "whoa" purely to tell the horse to do a downward transition?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-13-2012, 11:51 AM
  #2
Weanling
If the horse is not listening to me, yes I give them a little bump on the lead. I use "easy" when I want them to slow down, and "Woah" when to stop. If your out riding and something goes wrong, and you say Woah, you want them to stop not slow down. Just my opinon.
sierrams1123 likes this.
     
    01-13-2012, 12:16 PM
  #3
Trained
I use my body language.
     
    01-13-2012, 12:22 PM
  #4
Weanling
Usually I'll repeat the command a little louder and more aggressively. Then I use my body language to warn them that they better listen ;). I usually only have problems with getting them moving faster, so sometimes I will tap them on the shoulder with rope to encourage movement if they are ignoring cues. When I want them to go downward I usually say "easy" and give them the command. "eaaasssyyy, trot"
     
    01-13-2012, 12:45 PM
  #5
Foal
Okay... perhaps I will switch my voice cues and then stick to it.


As with body language, I try my best but I need to work on that myself. I am reading about it because I've never really been taught anything about it. I do realize the differences in his behavior though when I pay attention to it.

For example, he was really running around the circle when I was lunging him, but then I realized if I changed my body language, he calmed down quite a bit. I think I was facing him too "offensively"
     
    01-13-2012, 01:05 PM
  #6
mls
Trained
Whoa should only mean stop.

Voice and body language are huge tools for lunging. Your commands should be light and crisp up an upward transition, low and firm for a downward transition.

I walk a small circle with the horse as I lunge. My body encourages them forward and I get more of a work out too! When I want the downward, I slow or stop and lower the whip (if I am using one).

If they don't listen to the voice - for an upward transition - move with them - staying towards the hip to encourage forward. For downward, stop and if you need to put more tension on the line. Hand over hand - make the circle smaller until they do break gait. You have to be quick though to ensure they stay forward.

For a horse that won't 'whoa' - we send them to the wall/fence and use the wall as a partner. Can be comical though if our cow bred horses don't want to stop. They roll back and keep going.
     
    01-13-2012, 01:12 PM
  #7
Foal
Thanks mls, that was pretty helpful. I know most of this stuff but I am still learning to apply it when and where.
     
    01-13-2012, 02:29 PM
  #8
Started
In Parelli Natural Horsemanship, we're not allowed to voice cue at all, from day one, because we need to develop our body language, & skills with giving the right feel with rope & stick/wand to the horse. It's a discipline that will improve your clarity for the horse tremendously!

Also, we understand that going round & round in mindless circles is totally boring for the horse, so we keep it short, & keep it interesting by causing changes of gait & direction & allowing the horse to pick the direction sometimes, in a spirit of amiability, & not facing him with "all your eyes" (your entire front, solar plexus, etc., facing him "sounds" like a bullhorn to him), but standing STILL & passing rope behind our backs as he goes round. We allow him to "ask a question", we don't get on him for breaking gait or anything, so as to keep the relationship top priority, not his perfect performance.

In short, I don't longe, I do circling game, for the reasons mentioned.
     
    01-13-2012, 02:34 PM
  #9
Foal
Thank you Northern. I don't think that will be a technique I will be using though. If it works for you, great!
     
    01-13-2012, 02:49 PM
  #10
Trained
Don't switch your voice cues. You want to be consistent. You are teaching your pony a new language.
I would suggest a yank on the line to get him to face you. You are saying, "Pay attention," not, "STOP THAT, YOU SO & SO!!!". Say "Pay attention" with the line, and then, ask again. PRAISE LAVISHLY with any effort. Your pony really does want to please you, and it helps to bond with him.
According to Ryan Gingerich, research suggests no MORE than 7 repetitions at any one training session. After that a horse will tune you out. Just a handy rule of thumb. =D
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Young horse just not listening to the bit? DeeSmith Horse Tack and Equipment 3 06-08-2011 06:50 PM
Can you put collection on voice cue? coffeeaddict Horse Training 20 05-10-2011 02:48 PM
Voice Commands youngm357 Horse Training 2 08-21-2010 08:53 PM
Listening to what your horse has to say! dreamrideredc Horse Talk 5 06-14-2010 08:14 AM
voice commmands BryCowboy7 Horse Riding 16 06-03-2009 04:43 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0