rescue horse and her behavior
   

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rescue horse and her behavior

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  • Rescue horses behavior
  • Rescue pony what to feed her

 
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    02-23-2007, 10:51 PM
  #1
Foal
rescue horse and her behavior

My name is Josh Cook, im kinda new to the horse game! Neways this past sunday I bought a "rescue" horse (the owners were downsizing their farm, she was headed for the proccesesors, and so these people bought her, and I bought her from them)!!Shes a up comming 3 yr old QH with good bloodlines... I rode her all around before I bought her...and she was fine (she was also drug free)!

Prob #1 Yesterday I went to briddle her and she threw a fit and wanted no part of it. Netime id touch her face, her head would go up out of my reach. She never reared or acted mean, she just didnt want me touching her mouth! She did the same thing tonight!! I checked out her teeth, and the two bottom fronts are both broke at about the gum line... so I would think this might be the problem, but you can tell they have been this way for a while and she gave the other people no problems!

Prob #2 she's a little on the light side, actually rather thin! So I feed her twice daily as follows---scoop is a 21oz cup-- 2 scoops rolled steamed oats, 2 scoops baby beef horse and mule ration, 2 scoops sweet feed, 4 oz. Vegtable oil... she also has all the grass hay she can eat! She was wormed sunday... she also got a trace mineral block yesterday! Is this a good way to put weight on her?? Or is it wasting feed... cause I've noticed most of the feed is comming out her other end!?!?!


Prob #3 I don't know if its because she's so thin or if she has been starved at some point but she is extremly potective of her food! The lady I bought her from warned us not to feed her with other horses but assured us she is fine with humans! And for the most part this has held true, her ears lay back if you get close but she doesnt seem to do anything?? She does however try to knock the feed bucket out of your hand if you don't poor it in her trough as soon as you enter the pen with it!! Tonight though.. we fed her about an hour later than we had been... when she came to the fence she was hot... she was really jittery and seemed as though she was getting ready to jump the fence!!! I ended up just dumping the food in the first place I could find to keep her from hurting herself!!

Other than those 3 things she seems to be really well behaved she rides great (if you can get the briddle on) and doesnt mind being rubbed on or felt on!!!

Please help!! Josh C!!

     
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    02-23-2007, 11:17 PM
  #2
Yearling
Um..?

Her teeth are broken? Poor baby. No wonder she doesn't want you touching her head, let alone a bit in her mouth. She is in PAIN. More then likely her feed is not being digested due to her damaged teeth. Even if it is her front teeth that are broken rather then her molars, chewing is probably painful regardless. I can easily see her trying to avoid chewing causing little and slow digestion, resulting in her weight loss. How did she lose her front teeth? If they are broken then is sounds like an abuse case. If she were so harshly abused by her owners, it would be understandable for her to behave for her previous owners out of fear, not willingness or submission.

As far as becoming 'hot,' her schedule had been altered. Horses do NOT like changes in the schedule, they do not handle this well. The effect on a horse is often times severe enough for them to colic. It is extremely important to have a routine developed for them and to stick to it. It is even more important to establish a routine right now for her in her new and unfamiliar environment. She had something she expected and was comfortable with (feed) but it was altered, causing stress on her part.

I highly highly HIGHLY recommend getting a vet out or trusted equine 'dentist' to examine her teeth. If she is in pain when she eats, change her feed to a soft and easily digested food (slowly, especially if it is suspected she was starved) until her teeth are resolved. Be very kind and patient. I highly commend you for adopting her, that's admirable. Now she just needs the help you can give her. Good luck and keep us posted.
     
    02-24-2007, 02:40 AM
  #3
Foal
Back off on the hot feed too

I would refrain from giving her any of the high sugar feed your feeding her until you get the vet out to see her.....

If she isn't digesting her feed and that sugar in the large intesting (cecum and colon) could cause her to founder and now you have added to her misery possibly for life! Not to mention it will make her high strung because she isn't expending the energy these grains are creating.

Undigested feed in Manure is a sign of dental problems and refusing to get on the bit is another.......

Question..... Is it common for people in your neck of the woods to be riding a 3 year old?
     
    02-24-2007, 10:24 PM
  #4
Foal
In texas it isnt normal to ride a horse at 3 but in oklahoma im assuming it is~lol~j/k~we don't know what has happened to her teeth but it seems to have been that way for a while~she doesnt seem to have a problem chewing her food~what would a vet do for me?~she doesnt seem as though she has been abused because she is very sweet and easy to catch~but as we said before we don't know everything about her past~we definitely arent going to give up on her we just want the best for her~how long does it usually take a horse to settle in at a new place?????~thanks for the advice and anymore is very appreciated~

Thanks tasha and josh~

Ps-- the only thing we do know about her past is that when she turned 2 ,before she was broke, she was taken to the feed lot and they just started riding her so she learned everything she knows there~
     
    02-24-2007, 11:13 PM
  #5
Yearling
Just saying 'it seems like' shouldn't be good enough. You need to know, for sure, that there is no possible way she's in pain. The only way to do that would to be advised by a professional - call a vet.
     

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