Rescue keeps biting
 
 

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Rescue keeps biting

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        09-21-2013, 12:21 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Rescue keeps biting

    I recently rescued a 20yr old paint gelding. Extremely skinny, had I not rescued him I do not believe he would have made it. I have had him about a month. Here is the problem when I went into his stall about two weeks ago to put a halter on him to let him out he bit me in the chest and shoved me. He wanted out now. Every time I give him a bath he try's to bite and when I tie him to groom him he try's to bite. I pop him in the muzzle and tell him No but, he doesn't seem to care. I have a 6 yr old little girl that I can not have around him because im afraid he will bite her. What do I do? I wish there was a sanctuary he could go to to live out the remainder of his life.i had no intentions of getting him but, I knew if I didn't he would die. Please help.
         
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        09-21-2013, 12:35 AM
      #2
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tamara1229    
    I recently rescued a 20yr old paint gelding. Extremely skinny, had I not rescued him I do not believe he would have made it. I have had him about a month. Here is the problem when I went into his stall about two weeks ago to put a halter on him to let him out he bit me in the chest and shoved me. He wanted out now. Every time I give him a bath he try's to bite and when I tie him to groom him he try's to bite. I pop him in the muzzle and tell him No but, he doesn't seem to care. I have a 6 yr old little girl that I can not have around him because im afraid he will bite her. What do I do? I wish there was a sanctuary he could go to to live out the remainder of his life.i had no intentions of getting him but, I knew if I didn't he would die. Please help.
    You need to gain his respect, he's disrespecting you and figures he's in charge and can push you around. Sounds to me he is intimidating you by biting and shoving you.

    I would do work with him, teach him your personal space, if he so much as nips at you back him up, go at him like his life is over! You need to intimidate him and show him you're the boss.....not saying you have to be mean/cruel to him but if you watch horses they kick/bit really hard!

    Do a search on Youtube of Clinton Anderson, watch some of his videos on gaining respect/control on the ground with a horse......sounds like he's gotten away with it and it will get worse if you don't put a stop to it now!
         
        09-21-2013, 02:12 AM
      #3
    Green Broke
    There are very few horses that if they are not handled properly will not do this type of thing, some are much worse than other about it than others.

    And popping him in the muzzle is game to him, not correction, or worse, he is coming back at you harder and you are giving up possibly.

    It could be your handling combined with too hot a feed, depending on what grain and hay you are giving him.

    But mostly it is going to be your handling of him I think. And much depends on whether or not he was like this before you got him, as opposed to one that has figured out it can run the show since you brought him home.

    And this is not a situation I would recommend you watch videos to fix. If you don't have the gumption to deal with this? Trying to correct it yourself will only make it worse, in that the horse realizes you will only push so far to correct and it will then push back harder. Correcting a horse takes some inner strength and that can't be learned easily without someone on the ground beside you.

    Without knowing how much you REALLY know about horses? I would suggest you find someone near you, who is not into "touchy feely...love the horsies" mess, and let them work with horse and you too.

    So much of handling horses comes from your attitudes with them, and you don't have that at this point.

    Get some help there on the ground, or this could end badly.
    Mochachino likes this.
         
        09-21-2013, 07:35 AM
      #4
    Super Moderator
    He did not want out of the stall, now. He wanted YOU out of the stall, NOW!

    First of all, why is he in a stall? Horses belong out where they can move around. Keep him out of the stall.

    Depending on how viciously he is biting, he needs two things. First, hold a nail between your thumb and finger and let him run into it. It is like running into an electric fence. Most horses will run into a mostly concealed nail only once or twice. That buys you some time.

    Second, you must get his respect. The best way to do this is to put a stiff rope halter on him and a nice, thick, comfortable soft lead-rope. You (or someone) will have to jerk that rope hard enough to make him back up. When he is backing up and you are marching forward toward him, he is learning who is in charge.

    With horses, the one who moves their feet first and backs up first LOSES. It is all a 'mind game' and he is currently wining. There is always a winner and loser in establishing the 'pecking order'. You are now losing. He has trained you and you are the one backing up and letting him call all of the shots.

    If you can't turn this around, you need to get rid of him before he hurts someone. Remember that you are legally responsible for him and liable for anyone's injuries.

    If this horse is trained and ridable, maybe someone with experience can try to get him unspoiled and see if he could be useful when he is back in condition.

    Along the way, you really need to learn that you can't save them all. If you want a more rewarding way to spend your money on a 'rescue', you could save a thin young but healthy horse from slaughter and it would be a useful animal for many years. If this one is not useful, it would be better to humanely put him down than risk the safety of others.
         
        09-21-2013, 11:19 AM
      #5
    Foal
    He was in a stall because his skin is healing. I live in south Florida and the sun is brutal. So he is in for the hottest part of the day. He is a mostly white paint. I board so I go out about 3 pm and let him out. He goes back in in the morning. He was standing in water that was up to my knees at the "rescue" he was at. The other horse that came with him had already died. There was nobody that was going to help this horse. Thank you for all the advise. There is a trainer that comes out to the stable for a couple of the ladies there and I bend her ear when she is there. She said the same thing, when he nips at me to make him back up and work. He doesn't put his ears back and come at me mouth open, his ears are up and it's more of a nip and push. I have been around horses most of my life. This is the first time I have ever had a horse try to bite. He is still to skinny to ride. The trainer however did say she would put a saddle on him and get him used to it. Start ground work with him. If there was a retirement place around I would take him.
         
        09-21-2013, 11:35 AM
      #6
    Weanling
    Good, I would get her to do some groundwork sessions with him. You need to be there watching at first and then you need to switch positions with her. She watches and instructs you handling him.
         
        09-21-2013, 11:53 AM
      #7
    Green Broke
    You have some good advice from other posters. I`d like to add that my companion horse decided he`d try nipping me for awhile. I think he had plans on moving up the pecking order - it was an unsuccessful venture on his part.

    All the instances took place when he was in the corral or pasture. The first time it caught me by surprise nonetheless I yelled, blocked his head with my hand, put arms in the air and chased him out my space; the next two times (that`s all it took), I had my hand in position and ready with my fingers held rigidly (like you were holding an invisible ball) so that as soon as he turned his head towards me he ran into my fingers. He`s been fine ever since but I shall always be on the watch with him just in case.

    Also, since your charge has some skin problems going on that is probably aggrevating the situation as it is no doubt painful. Perhaps putting on a grazing muzzle when you go to work with him (or have your daughter around) would prevent injury to yourselves. You will still have to address the biting problem and I`m sure you will succeed once you set up your biting prevent program.

    Good luck.
    Tamara1229 likes this.
         
        09-21-2013, 12:21 PM
      #8
    Yearling
    I heard a quote by Tom Dorrance once, when someone asked him what to do about a horse that bites. "Do your best to stay out of his mouth until you can get control of his feet". Couple of other things, if he's been fed by hand don't do that anymore. If he hasn't been, don't start. It is possible to teach a horse to be fed by hand and be respectful too, but that line is just too fine for most people to ride if that makes sense? The way that I personally deal with a horse that already bites is this though: I see it coming a mile away, and when they try to bite I'm just not there. If I'm in close they might find my elbow halfway in-between where they thought they were trying to go with their teeth. Now, in order to do that you need to know where to stand and how and when to move, but that's exactly what I do. I make myself impossible to bite - but I DON'T get into a confrontation over it or play retaliation games with the horse as this actually fuels the fire thus having the opposite of the intended effect!

    I know that's a lot of ideas that may be difficult to remember when you're actually in the moment, but the take-home message is basically this: Your correction is in the feet. Cause those feet to move and he won't even think of biting. If he's a dangerous horse to be close to, find someplace like a round pen or something similar to where you can move those feet from a safe distance but MOVE THOSE FEET! It can be fast or it can be slow, it can be one foot at a time or a gallop just so long as those feet move.

    Just be careful not to get kicked too!
    Tamara1229 likes this.
         
        09-21-2013, 02:31 PM
      #9
    Foal
    Thank for all the great advice! When he is in the pasture and I walk up to him I can rub him all I want he doesn't care. It's when he is getting a bath (his skin is healing nicely only a couple of spots) or when he is in the barn cross tied getting brushed. He hates to be tied! I am going to put a bridle on him today and if he tries to nip, I will get those feet moving. I am also going to inquire with the trainer to see if she would like to help me out. If nothing works is there a retirement place in Florida? Vet says he is 20 give or take a few. No history from the rescue on him. Believe me I have tried to get any information but, that's a whole nother story!
         
        09-21-2013, 02:33 PM
      #10
    Foal
    Picture

    Here is a picture of him. Isn't he a pretty boy! Just gotta work on manners!
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    Thunderspark likes this.
         

    Tags
    behavior problems, biting nipping problem, rescue, rescue horse

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