Retraining a disrespctful, spoiled, pasture pet?
   

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Retraining a disrespctful, spoiled, pasture pet?

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  • My horse is pasture spoiled
  • Retraining the pastured horse

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  • 1 Post By beau159

 
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    12-25-2011, 04:00 PM
  #1
Yearling
Retraining a disrespctful, spoiled, pasture pet?

Hello again everyone! I would like to get some advice on my friends horse.


He is a six or seven year old pony of an unknown breed, he isn't gelded, he's bratty and pushy, kicks bites

Andd throws a huge head tossing pawing fit when he doesn't get his grain quick enough. He was given to my friend from a breeder, who passed away. He was three years old. Since then he has been turned out in a small pen wwith very little handling.


I offere to work with him (they want to sell him) because I was at her house when they were feeding and I was SHOCKED at his disrespect. He's halter broke only. He's super cute, and with a lot of work could be a super horse. So, I was thinkinglooooots of ground work. Some tips for gaining respect? And building muscle, especially on the topline. Thanks!
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    12-25-2011, 07:48 PM
  #2
Foal
I am novice to horses, but now addicted and have been reading every trainers opinion and watching every video I can , besides having a trainer- I wouldn't dream of offering you advice or an opinion only a suggestion- what I am getting at, Clinton Anderson advertises he takes problem horses, states no horse is to much for him and I believe at times free- to show corrections of problems at some of his tours-not sure if the tour has to be where you are located ...but you might look into it and see if he could possibly help ? It would be better for the horse that is for sure. Good luck, be safe.
     
    12-25-2011, 09:23 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovesMyDunnBoy    
andd throws a huge head tossing pawing fit when he doesn't get his grain quick enough.
Throwing fits need to immidiatly be corrected, let that little pony know he is not allowed to throw fits, and if he does, well he can just stand their throwing a giant hissy fit, and until he is standing their patiently, he gets NO grain. Whether you have to stand out their with a whip to keep him away, or even make him run around the pasture until he submits to you, and holds his peace.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LovesMyDunnBoy    
Some tips for gaining respect? And building muscle, especially on the topline. Thanks!
Well, I would start with lunging, that should gain a lot of respect, and build muscles at the same time. Also, for gaining respect, make it the end of the world if he throws a fit, or if he tries to bite you, or kick, or whatever. If he does attempt to bite, I wouldn't suggest smacking him on his face though, it would only make him head shy, but smack him on his shoulder, or neck, and yell, and make him repent
     
    12-25-2011, 10:14 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovesMyDunnBoy    
He is a six or seven year old pony of an unknown breed, he isn't gelded, he's bratty and pushy, kicks bites andd throws a huge head tossing pawing fit when he doesn't get his grain quick enough.
First thing: Is there a reason that he is not gelded? Since his breed is even unknown, I am making the assumption that he is not worth anything to breed because his blood lines are not even known. Gelding him will help with the behavioral issues. Plus, with the horse market flooded the way it is (hopefully it will get better now with the re-opening of horse slaughter), there's no good reason to keep him a stud.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LovesMyDunnBoy    
He was given to my friend from a breeder, who passed away. He was three years old. Since then he has been turned out in a small pen wwith very little handling.
So he's had 3 or 4 years of just "being a horse" and having this bad behavior reinforced. No, it's not a death certificate, but it sure it going to make it harder to fix the behavioral issues because it is long-standing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LovesMyDunnBoy    
I offere to work with him (they want to sell him) because I was at her house when they were feeding and I was SHOCKED at his disrespect. He's halter broke only. He's super cute, and with a lot of work could be a super horse. So, I was thinkinglooooots of ground work. Some tips for gaining respect? And building muscle, especially on the topline. Thanks!
Would they keep him if you work with him? Or would they still sell him in the end anyway?

What is your experience working with problem horses? Because that is essentially what this is. The owner's clearly don't know how to handle him and continue to let the problem go uncorrected. And it's a long-standing issue and while it is not impossible, it will not be easy to change his bad habits. Just be sure you are fully aware of what you are getting yourself into.

So the owners need to be in on this too. Because if you go and make progress with him, but they still allow him to do his bad behavior during feeding or what have you, your progress will be set back.

He needs to learn manners. He needs to learn that humans are the alpha leader in the herd, not him. So YOU control when he gets his feed and how he responds to you with it. Not him.

Whenever you reprimand him for bad behavior, you have only 5 seconds to respond. Any longer than that, and a horse will not correlate the action with his bad behavior. So you have to be quick and consistent.

Don't allow him to nip or bite (if he does). If he tries, he should think the world is going to end for the immediate 3 seconds following. Some people will tell you never to hit a horse, but I personaly have no problem giving my horses one smack on the nose to "bite them back" if they try to bite me. Accompanied by making yourself big, loud, arms, body, for 3 seconds to show that that was NOT the correct behavior to bite. After 3 seconds, go back to whatever you were doing like nothing happened. This is what I do with my horses and the ones I train, and NONE of them bite. They've learned.

Always make him keep his space outside of your bubble. Imagine if he was a big 16-hand horse instead of a pony. It might be cute if a pony pushes into your space, but a larger horse can do damage. Treat him as if he were a large horse and he needs to respect your space at all times and not crowd you. Consistently is key.

In general, he should be taught to move away from pressure. It's helpful to train this with lunging and round pen work, because you can also teach them to never turn their hindquarters to you. It's disrespectful.

He just needs handling, work, consistency, time, and cooperation from everyone that handles him. If the owners don't want to do this, then I suggest they just sell him because you working with him, and then them un-doing it, won't help matters.
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    12-25-2011, 11:04 PM
  #5
Showing
I am with you on lots of ground work. Work on step one, catching him. Then while you've got him, work on all of the behavior he gives you like trying to bite, pop him with the lead rope or chase him away from you (maybe carry a little crop or something in case he gets really pushy.)

I've found it's best to have them in a rope halter, but it's up to you. Make sure you have a long enough lead rope though.

Where are you planning on working with him.. at their place? Do they have some sort of fenced in arena or extra paddock?

I would treat him like he knows absolutely nothing. And don't give him any breathing room in regards to challenging your authority. Since he's been spoiled for what seems like a long time, he might be quite the space invader.

I'm also curious as to why they haven't had him gelded yet.. it would probably get his attitude in check a bit.
Eitherway good luck :)
     
    12-26-2011, 08:31 PM
  #6
Yearling
Thank you for the responses.


I don't have the slightest idea why he wasn't gelded before 3 years, but I know my friend hasn't had it done because they don't take responsabilty for their animals..they have like 20 cats and 7 dogs, not one is spayed or nutered.


They don't know anything about horse haha. And I will be doing it at their house in his pen because I have small kids at my house and feel he is too dangerous.



I'm not sure if they would stilkeep him...but I think he could make a good littlepony with a lot of work. He has nice comfo over all...very cute face. With an attitude adjustmet he'd mmake a good pony.


And you all suggested the same thing I had in mind, when he is disrespectful I'll make him think the world is ending.



Thanks! :)
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    12-26-2011, 08:42 PM
  #7
Trained
This boy needs to be gelded if he's to have a chance at finding a different home to start with. Also, you will find his training in basic manners with be easier for you & anyone else working with him. Best advice I can offer.
     
    12-27-2011, 12:12 PM
  #8
Yearling
That was my first thought of course, but he is't my horse to decide that on is the problem. I do plan to speak with the owners about it though.


I have a question, of course riding is pretty far into the future, but how would you teach a horse that's like 12 hands to ride? I'm 5'9'' and 150 pounds, and I couldn't riide him?
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    12-27-2011, 12:29 PM
  #9
Weanling
If you do get as far a backing him, look for a ligthweight jockey to do the leaning and riding for you. A teenager with a lot of experience is best, preferably with experience of young horses too. I am currently jockeying a 11.2hh, and soon a 12.2hh, pony for my instructor and I am 5'4" I look riduculous hahaha its not so much weight (up to a point) but height. The taller the riders body, the more wobbly they are going to be on a little pony because the center of gravity is higher.
Keep an eye out for smallish riders in your area. Most of us teenagers are very willing to get extra rides!
     

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