Ridin the in between!
 
 

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Ridin the in between!

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        12-15-2009, 11:40 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    Ridin the in between!

    I had an old friend that is long gone now and would share tips about riding with me from time to time.
    He used to say "son you got to ride to in between" and at the time I had a real hard time understanding what he was trying to say to me.

    I got into a conversation with a young student the other day about lead departures (she is 12) and she is doing pretty good on one of my mares.
    Now I have this whole thing about keeping the horse evenly loaded in a straight line and getting the horse to track straight with a straight spine and even foot falls.
    Well she keeps getting the horse a little sideways after she gets the lead and the horse starts to drift.

    So to counter the drift,she starts putting more leg on the horse to keep it from drifting in that direction.

    The horse takes the cue of more leg to mean that it was supposed to go faster.

    She counters that with pulling back to slow the horse down.

    The mare gives pretty well and over-flexes on the bit past the vertical.

    So this little girl get her departure just fine, then goes galloping past me,too fast and sideways,bent to the left,on the right lead,over-flexed and all bunched up,getting ready to buck.

    I said to her as she reported back in for my review about the run.

    Darlin, You got to ride the in between.
         
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        12-16-2009, 12:39 AM
      #2
    Trained
    I like that!! It's feel, timing and balance but when you you say ride the in between it makes it much less intimidating.
         
        12-16-2009, 03:21 AM
      #3
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    I like that!! It's feel, timing and balance but when you you say ride the in between it makes it much less intimidating.
    Actually I find it the opposite, I find it very intimidating! All I have is thirty years *gulp* of riding horses and not falling off for the most part. I have never had any kind of riding tuition in my life, infact it has only been the last two years that I have had a group of riding companions to bounce ideas off. I have read ALOT of horse books through out my entire riding history, from when I was a young girl I lived and breathed horses and buried myself in horse books.

    I would love to have had a mentor but never have so have muddled along as best I could. I don't know if I ride the in between, hell I don't even know if I ride the inside or outside.
         
        12-16-2009, 10:16 AM
      #4
    Yearling
    I think my old friend was just trying to say that you have to be in the moment and do the best you can to stay WITH the horse and not let yourself get so behind that you are just a passenger.
    To try to know what is about to happen and deal with with it.

    He had a lot of little sayings that I am still trying to figure out.
         
        12-16-2009, 11:06 AM
      #5
    Foal
    You got to let it flow!! If you focus on all the cues individually you overcorrect. Lighten up and let it flow!!
         
        12-16-2009, 11:07 AM
      #6
    Showing
    A common error in the learning process. After a new rider completes a maneuver, they stop riding. What we used to tell them was that they needed to keep riding their horse before, during, and after. That the lead change was only the middle of the maneuver.
         
        12-16-2009, 11:21 AM
      #7
    Yearling
    I like that.

    A couple of years ago I started taking weekly lessons on hubby's horse. Hubby is on the road so much that Kooter was becoming a couch potato and he was only 10. Kooter was well trained, but one of those horse's that had done a lot of things but nothing for any length of time.

    I've done years of lessons off and on with my older horse, but Kooter is a lot more sensitive to aids than his brother. What you describing Marecare was exactly what was happening to me. So, call in some help........the young lady I take lessons from watched me ride for all of about 2 minutes and then said put him into the gait you want and then leave him alone.......if you need to do an adjustment then do it and go back to leaving him alone. I was so busy trying to correct one thing that I was causing him to think he needed to do something else. All I was ending up with was a domino effect.
         
        12-16-2009, 02:22 PM
      #8
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 5cuetrain    
    You got to let it flow!! If you focus on all the cues individually you overcorrect. Lighten up and let it flow!!
    Ahhhhhh! I get what you mean! Yes, it is knowing that your horse is where he is meant to be right now but also feeling where he is going to be next. I know what I am talking about I just suck at trying to explain.
         
        12-16-2009, 02:28 PM
      #9
    Yearling
    When I ride I call it, Moments of brilliance followed by large quantities of mediocrity.

    I got!,oh no I lost it,oh,oh I think I am getting it......where did it go?
         
        12-16-2009, 02:38 PM
      #10
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marecare    
    When I ride I call it, Moments of brilliance followed by large quantities of mediocrity.

    I got!,oh no I lost it,oh,oh I think I am getting it......where did it go?
    My personal favourite: How did you do that?! Dunno, not sure. Could you do it again?! Ummm dunno, not sure.
         

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