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Rubbing and other issues

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        01-22-2013, 06:38 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Rubbing and other issues

    Hey everyone I need some help any advice and help would be great. So my issues are, my mare Aurora, she is a black tobiano gypsy vanner, wont stop rubbing her head on me and sometimes it gets so bad she almost knocks me over and I try not to let her and I correct her for it but after a few minutes she starts doing it again and it hurts when she has a bridle on cause the bit hits me, she does it most with the a halter or bridle on. Also some other things she steps on my feet and paws the ground if she doesn't get her way. Anyone who could help I would love forever.
         
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        01-22-2013, 07:31 PM
      #2
    Foal
    You first need to understand why she does the rubbing. Horses show dominance in a herd by getting the other horse to move their feet. When she rubs on you she is trying to move you and show her dominance. Continue to correct her every time she does it, even if it becomes a chore. Add on at the end making her move. You'll be showing her that she can't move you but you can move her. This can be simply by making her back up, to the side, whatever the environment allows you to do. Just stick with it. The stepping on your feet is her invading your space. She doesn't mean to do it but she should not be that close to you that it happens. Keep her out of your space. If she moves close to you without you asking, move her back. You'll need to do some groundwork with her to work on her awareness of your space. If you want her close to you, she needs to be invited in and then love up on her to show that it's ok if she's respectful to be close to you. Finally the pawing, this is usually an impatient habit horses use when board or not getting what they want. If she paws simply correct her, you can move her around for this too. I usually just give a deep, stern "quit" when a horse that I've been working with paws. This is after they've gotten use to me and my voice from training too.
    Spotted likes this.
         
        01-22-2013, 07:53 PM
      #3
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SRose    
    You first need to understand why she does the rubbing. Horses show dominance in a herd by getting the other horse to move their feet. When she rubs on you she is trying to move you and show her dominance. Continue to correct her every time she does it, even if it becomes a chore. Add on at the end making her move. You'll be showing her that she can't move you but you can move her. This can be simply by making her back up, to the side, whatever the environment allows you to do. Just stick with it. The stepping on your feet is her invading your space. She doesn't mean to do it but she should not be that close to you that it happens. Keep her out of your space. If she moves close to you without you asking, move her back. You'll need to do some groundwork with her to work on her awareness of your space. If you want her close to you, she needs to be invited in and then love up on her to show that it's ok if she's respectful to be close to you. Finally the pawing, this is usually an impatient habit horses use when board or not getting what they want. If she paws simply correct her, you can move her around for this too. I usually just give a deep, stern "quit" when a horse that I've been working with paws. This is after they've gotten use to me and my voice from training too.
    Horses don't rub on each other to make them move. Sorry, but that is completely wrong. To make a more submissive horse move away, a dominant horse uses body language - effectively pushing them out of their space without touching them most of the time. They will also bite and kick.

    This horse is more than likely just rubbing sweaty, itchy spots on her face. OP - don't let her do it, it is disrespectful of her, but mostly it is just plain dangerous, as you are discovering with the bit hitting you. Horses have big heavy heads, and humans are comparatively very frail. Get after her and make her believe that rubbing on you results in all sorts of hell raining down on her, and you will both be happier.

    Once she isn't rubbing on you, then you can deal with the reason - the itchiness on her face. After a ride, I usually spend five or ten minutes scratching the face of the horse I rode, working into all the areas that the bridle goes on, and help out with that itch.
    Foxhunter and FaydesMom like this.
         
        01-22-2013, 09:55 PM
      #4
    Showing
    We had a pony that couldn't wear a bridle for 10 min without trying to rub on someone. During an Aha moment I clipped wherever the bridle touched - end of problem. Had to clip the saddle area too and he stopped trying to roll.
         
        01-22-2013, 10:03 PM
      #5
    Started
    Along with what other have said, I would try cleaning their ears out. Sometimes there ears are in need of cleaning. I would not let her rub her head on me though. A good smack should take care of that
         
        01-23-2013, 07:50 AM
      #6
    Super Moderator
    Welcome to the Horse Forum.

    This is simply a horse that has no ground manners. Horses are big enough animals that to be tolerable, they need to have good ground manners. This horse has no manners at all.

    You need to teach her to respect you, to stay out of your personal space and to respect you at all times. Right now she is just a wreck looking for a place to happen. If she paws you, knocks you out of her way or knocks you down, she WILL hurt you. She can easily break your bones.

    Get someone to teach you some ground exercises and get them to teach you how to teach her to respect your space. She needs to move back and over each direction when you ask.

    You can do a search here on the Forum for respect and ground exercises. There have been hundreds of threads written that detail dozens of exercises you can teach her that will make her show you the respect you deserve.

    There are Clinicians that have DVDs out there that show people how to get respect. Clinton Anderson is probably the best at making it understandable. His groundwork is very effective at making a respectful horse.
    Foxhunter likes this.
         
        01-23-2013, 11:17 AM
      #7
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SRose    
    You first need to understand why she does the rubbing. Horses show dominance in a herd by getting the other horse to move their feet. When she rubs on you she is trying to move you and show her dominance. Continue to correct her every time she does it, even if it becomes a chore. Add on at the end making her move. You'll be showing her that she can't move you but you can move her. This can be simply by making her back up, to the side, whatever the environment allows you to do. Just stick with it. The stepping on your feet is her invading your space. She doesn't mean to do it but she should not be that close to you that it happens. Keep her out of your space. If she moves close to you without you asking, move her back. You'll need to do some groundwork with her to work on her awareness of your space. If you want her close to you, she needs to be invited in and then love up on her to show that it's ok if she's respectful to be close to you. Finally the pawing, this is usually an impatient habit horses use when board or not getting what they want. If she paws simply correct her, you can move her around for this too. I usually just give a deep, stern "quit" when a horse that I've been working with paws. This is after they've gotten use to me and my voice from training too.
    Thanks for your help! I will keep at correcting her and do some of the other things you suggested!
         
        01-23-2013, 11:20 AM
      #8
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Chiilaa    
    Horses don't rub on each other to make them move. Sorry, but that is completely wrong. To make a more submissive horse move away, a dominant horse uses body language - effectively pushing them out of their space without touching them most of the time. They will also bite and kick.

    This horse is more than likely just rubbing sweaty, itchy spots on her face. OP - don't let her do it, it is disrespectful of her, but mostly it is just plain dangerous, as you are discovering with the bit hitting you. Horses have big heavy heads, and humans are comparatively very frail. Get after her and make her believe that rubbing on you results in all sorts of hell raining down on her, and you will both be happier.

    Once she isn't rubbing on you, then you can deal with the reason - the itchiness on her face. After a ride, I usually spend five or ten minutes scratching the face of the horse I rode, working into all the areas that the bridle goes on, and help out with that itch.
    Thanks for your help! I will keep correcting her behavior, and once it is better I will figure out why she is doing it!
         
        01-23-2013, 11:21 AM
      #9
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    We had a pony that couldn't wear a bridle for 10 min without trying to rub on someone. During an Aha moment I clipped wherever the bridle touched - end of problem. Had to clip the saddle area too and he stopped trying to roll.
    Hmm I might have to try that, thanks for your help!
         
        01-23-2013, 11:23 AM
      #10
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Casey02    
    Along with what other have said, I would try cleaning their ears out. Sometimes there ears are in need of cleaning. I would not let her rub her head on me though. A good smack should take care of that
    Okay I will check, thanks for your help! And I don't let her I smack her for it but then she waits a few minutes before doing it again so I will keep at it and correct her when she is being that way.
         

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