Saddle Breaking horses REALLY young........ - Page 4
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Saddle Breaking horses REALLY young........

This is a discussion on Saddle Breaking horses REALLY young........ within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

    Like Tree216Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        06-27-2012, 01:00 PM
      #31
    Trained
    I have seen a lot long yearlings started and when done correctly it is no worse then what I have seen on horses who where started as 3+ years old.

    This is simply do to the fact that starting them that young the trainer is not felling pushed to get them ready. They spend A LOT more time just walking the horse and pushing the horses body around. This builds musle in the horse gets them fit gets them use to carrying weight. By the time they are into their 2 yo year and ready to get more into real work they are more fit and so on to do the work proplery. I would much rather have a horse started say in Dec of their yearling year and started slow like most good trainers will do then stay wait until they are well into their 2 yo year and then you have to push them a bit more to catch up. The people I see waithing until the horse is older just end up thinking the horse is ready to be pushed faster and at the end of the day they stay no more sound then the one started correctly as a long yearling early 2yo.
    xxdanioo and cowboy bowhunter like this.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        06-27-2012, 01:22 PM
      #32
    Started
    Quote:
    They spend A LOT more time just walking the horse and pushing the horses body around. This builds musle in the horse gets them fit gets them use to carrying weight. By the time they are into their 2 yo year and ready to get more into real work they are more fit and so on to do the work proplery. I would much rather have a horse started say in Dec of their yearling year and started slow like most good trainers will do then stay wait until they are well into their 2 yo year and then you have to push them a bit more to catch up. The people I see waithing until the horse is older just end up thinking the horse is ready to be pushed faster and at the end of the day they stay no more sound then the one started correctly as a long yearling early 2yo.
    it seems logical a trainer who takes the time to get a horse in shape will have a sounder immature horse than one who condenses the same amount of training into a shorter period while the horse is still immature.

    The issue (to me) is that people are putting immature horses into serious work. If a horse doesnt have all its joints fuse untill 5-6 years old, it stands to reason that the harder a horse is worked before that point, the more likely you are to have issues down the road.

    I was just reading a cowboys life story, and the thing I really noticed was in his youth, they rounded up 5-6 year olds for rodeo, not two year olds and If they started the saddle horses at two, they made sure they were not put to hard work until 4 or 5.

    Its every owners choice, what risks they take with the lives under their care.
         
        06-27-2012, 01:26 PM
      #33
    Foal
    I started riding my horse when she was around a year and a half at a walk for a while and then moving onto a trot by the winter time. Right now, she is a little over 4 and I ride her w/t/c and I'm teaching her to barrel race. I also plan on beginning to break my other horse later this summer. He's only 15 months now. My vet said it was fine that I was riding them so young. I'm a light rider and never over work them so I don't see a problem with it.
         
        06-27-2012, 01:44 PM
      #34
    Yearling
    If the youngster is physically and mentally ready for some very light starting under saddle, and COMMONSENSE is used....I see no problem with it. My AQHA gelding was started at 2 and shown lightly....and he's 17 years old now, and still showing AQHA and has never taken a lame step in his life. So much for saying they all end up crippled and useless before they turn 10! I'm retiring him next month after the AQHA Regional Champ show simply because I have a 3 YO WP mare that will be ready to show this fall.

    As for futurities....you really don't see many 2 YO futurities at AQHA shows anymore except Congress. I haven't seen a 2 YO futurity at any of the AQHA shows I've gone to in over 5/6 years. You can't show a 2 YO under saddle until July 1st and even then, at the AQHA shows I go to....there are usually no 2 YO's in the WP classes...maybe as a warm up right before Congress in October.
    QHriderKE and xxdanioo like this.
         
        06-27-2012, 01:57 PM
      #35
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BlueSpark    
    it seems logical a trainer who takes the time to get a horse in shape will have a sounder immature horse than one who condenses the same amount of training into a shorter period while the horse is still immature.

    The issue (to me) is that people are putting immature horses into serious work. If a horse doesnt have all its joints fuse untill 5-6 years old, it stands to reason that the harder a horse is worked before that point, the more likely you are to have issues down the road.

    You first need to define serious work. When I have or I do it start a long yearling or early 2yo it is all walk and maybe a bit of troting.


    I was just reading a cowboys life story, and the thing I really noticed was in his youth, they rounded up 5-6 year olds for rodeo, not two year olds and If they started the saddle horses at two, they made sure they were not put to hard work until 4 or 5.

    Its every owners choice, what risks they take with the lives under their care.

    Again define hard work? Also are you sure those 5-6yo horses stayed sound any longer then a young horse started properly and slow? People seem to think b/c a horse is 5-6 they can just go out and push then to train them. They will try and fit everything we do in 2-3 years in 6 months. Which is better? Which horse is going to stay sound physically and mentaly longer?
    cowboy bowhunter likes this.
         
        06-27-2012, 02:04 PM
      #36
    Weanling
    The issue I see with some of it is that there is no solid way to track late age lameness and discomfort strictly to the age they are started. It is just as feasible, in my opinion, that a horse who is started at age 3 or even 4 or 5 for that matter, could end up with arthritis, stiffness in their back, weakness and general discomfort if they are ridden poorly all their life.

    I have been on my 2yo about three times, totaling less than 10 min in her life with a rider. I work her lightly in side reins about 3 days a week. When I say lightly, I mean that she spend only 3 or 4 minutes with the side reins attached and that covers going both directions and her lounge sessions are less than 20 minutes all told to protect her knees. I do a lot of in hand work, leading, line driving and exposing her to weird obstacles. I will not trot her under saddle until spring of her 3yo year and asking for canter will come as a result of her being mentally mature enough to handle it. I am guessing that will come close to the end of summer her 3yo year based on how she has learned up to this point. I find it hard to believe that this level of work and slow methodical conditioning is going to make my horse a cripple as some people have claimed.

    Conversely, I personally know a horse who was not started until he was 5. However, from the first day, he was ridden with his head pulled up, hollowing his back and putting strain on his neck. There was no forward drive, no relaxation and certainly no concern for his top line. This horse was totally shot by the time he was 15. The poor guy was so arthritic he was unridable. He was put down at age 17 because the pain was so bad he became aggressive and dangerous.

    I would LOVE to see a study done where a handful of trainers were given horses to start at different ages. The horses would need to be as similar in structure and temperament as possible so that the ONLY variable would be the age at which they were started. Track these horses over the course of 20 years and then determine what age would be optimal to start a horse for health and performance.
         
        06-27-2012, 02:36 PM
      #37
    Foal
    I personally don't agree with it. There is so much groundwork and everything to do that it seems like there is plenty to keep a young horse busy until 3! If you think about it, teaching it to them early is better because it will be more natural the older they become. It's kind of like starting school in kindergarten so that kids have a "childhood" I guess hah, but that's just how I would relate it:)
         
        06-27-2012, 02:40 PM
      #38
    Started
    Quote:
    5-6yo horses stayed sound any longer then a young horse started properly and slow?
    Not a fair comparison. Do I think a 5-6 year old started slowly the right way is more likely to stay sound longer than a yearling started the same way? Yes I do.

    Quote:
    You first need to define serious work. When I have or I do it start a long yearling or early 2yo it is all walk and maybe a bit of troting.
    I didn't claim you were putting your horses into "serious work" But there are an aweful lot of people doing many disaplines where the horse is spinning, stopping, running, jumping(etc, all of which could be classified as "serious" work) and expected to be collected and ballanced while doing it as barely two year olds.

    Quote:
    The issue I see with some of it is that there is no solid way to track late age lameness and discomfort strictly to the age they are started. It is just as feasible, in my opinion, that a horse who is started at age 3 or even 4 or 5 for that matter, could end up with arthritis, stiffness in their back, weakness and general discomfort if they are ridden poorly all their life.
    They are living creatures. Conformation, feeding, type of work they are asked to do, age they are asked to do it, the way they are stabled all contribute to soundness. There is no way to conclusively track the cause of lameness, all we can do is do our best to prevent it.
         
        06-27-2012, 02:49 PM
      #39
    Started
    Meh. You just have to be considerate of the horse.

    I'm going to show my girl in yearling lungeline and yearling in-hand trail, and I know there's a lot of controversy over that too. But the trick is to train smarter, not harder.

    After getting conditioned from that kind of work, I would naturally want to hop on her back as soon as her knees have closed. There are other factors, but that is my main concern. Again, working smarter and laying down the fundamentals of softness.

    I would hope to show her in English pleasure at the end of her 2 year old year, if she's ready, because I feel the english style is her more natural gait. I would definitely wait until she is 3 before seriously grinding down the western pleasure gaits. Just because it would take more serious training.

    This has been done to every horse I've had, and they've all went on to long happy lives. Don't really have any opinion on the long yearling though, don't really see the need for it if I do lungeline already.
         
        06-27-2012, 02:53 PM
      #40
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by madeline97    
    I personally don't agree with it. There is so much groundwork and everything to do that it seems like there is plenty to keep a young horse busy until 3!

    Really? Mine are board past a few hourse over a week of ground work. Once they get use to the saddle and bit and are moving and stopping on cue they start under saddle work. Most of what a horse needs to learn under saddle does not translate from ground work.

    If you think about it, teaching it to them early is better because it will be more natural the older they become. It's kind of like starting school in kindergarten so that kids have a "childhood" I guess hah, but that's just how I would relate it:)

    Starting them early has a lot of advantages over starting them latter. Have seen it time and time again. Horses who become lame latter is life have many other problems out side of when they where started.
    sherkad25 likes this.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Breaking in a saddle Horseychick94 Horse Tack and Equipment 3 12-05-2011 11:12 PM
    Pessoa,Paddock boots,breaking saddle,endurance saddle etc for sale/trade!! ImLonelyInCrowds Tack and Equipment Classifieds 6 01-25-2011 06:55 PM
    Breaking and Training Horses xdrybonesxvalleyx Horse Training 9 06-20-2010 08:28 PM
    breaking a young horse vent Angel_Leaguer Horse Training 7 11-17-2008 12:17 PM
    Breaking in the new saddle kitten_Val Horse Tack and Equipment 6 06-10-2008 01:52 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:14 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0