Scared of fly spray - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 20Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 19 Old 06-20-2014, 08:51 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Plano, Texas
Posts: 1,130
• Horses: 0
"I would kind of disagree with this, well, not that it works but that it is a good thing to do. That fly spy can be very irritating to the skin. Keeping it on the hair, without working it down to actual skin contact, will help keep flies away while minimizing skin absorbtion. Some of the chemicals are NOT good for any living thing. If I get the stuff on my hands, it kind of burns. I am very careful to spray my horse near his sheath (where the midges make him miserable) where there is plenty of hair and avoid the sheath itself , where the skin is thin and sensitive."

I agree with your concerns when using certain products. I would not use some products because of their toxic content. If the instructions say one should not touch anything after applying until one washes his hands, I would be hesitant to use the product even on the top coat of the hair. Do you know any horse that does not touch its mouth to its legs and body? I am more concerned with this than the product touching the skin.

I am currently using a homemade fly spray. It consists of one part Avon Skin-So-Soft, one part white vinegar, and two parts water. Some say to add a tablespoon of citronella oil. This spray seems to work about as well as any I've tried.

I've also heard of mixing apply cider vinegar with citronella oil.

Has anybody else found any effective and less toxic mixtures?
DraftyAiresMum likes this.

Training riders and horses to work in harmony.
www.quietriding.com
www.quietriding.org
TXhorseman is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 19 Old 06-20-2014, 10:02 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Central MS
Posts: 1,380
• Horses: 2
I did mine this morning

I put a halter and lead on them, hold the shank in one hand, and the fly spray in the other hand --- I stay calm and non-threatening and I spray them -- they back away and try to run from it, I continue spray as if everything in the world is just peachy (prety much the same thing CA does when desensitizing a horses legs to the lead rope)

By the time I finish one side and move to the other, they are calm and standing still ---- I might have to do this more regularly to keep them desensitized to it
Corporal and jamesdean57 like this.
jmike is offline  
post #13 of 19 Old 06-20-2014, 10:09 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: East Central Illinois
Posts: 7,109
• Horses: 3
It's all about training. Horses are afraid of the dumbest things, like a spray bottle.
First, fill a spray bottle with just plain water. Start by tying your horse, turn away and spray the air by walking away about 5 steps from your horse. Come back to your horse and repeat this 5x.
Then, start at the horse, and only walk about 2 steps, stop and spray. Repeat 5x...
Then, stand facing away from your horse and spray the air in front of you. Repeat...
Then, spray the air next your horse, then the feet, then the legs and basically overwhelm your horse with spraying him with water.
I like the ACV bc some horses are irritated by the chemicals in fly spray. Still, there is no excuse for your horse to act terrified of a spray bottle.
Put a couple of minutes rest in between all of the above. You should have this problem licked in a day.
IMO, you should buy some SWAT. I use my hand and put this on my horse's ears and under their eyes, just like football players do. Funny, you can't find the original formula anymore which came in hot pink!
jmike likes this.

A Jack and Three Queens, the latest book by James C. Dedman, Amazon.com
Hope that you fall in love with "Trot", like I did! http://www.horseforum.com/general-of...queens-617793/
Corporal is offline  
post #14 of 19 Old 06-20-2014, 10:10 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 880
• Horses: 2
As some others said desensitize the horses. Just have a longer lead
Rope and keep rubbing him with bottle till he relaxes. Then take the pressure off, as a reward. Keep doing that till the horse is relaxed completely. Then add the spray. If he run he runs. But don't let him win, when he relaxes take the pressure off and keep doing that till he's relaxed.

Good luck!

Btw I'm typing on my phone so I did a very short version lol
Corporal likes this.

Chad Barnes 6-16-85~7-22-13
Hero Act - Thoroughbred Gelding ~ Gunner - Quarter Horse Gelding ~ John Deere - Mini Gelding
HeroMyOttb is offline  
post #15 of 19 Old 06-21-2014, 02:01 AM
CAP
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 159
• Horses: 4
I have had a few horses who have always had a fear of bug spray, and over the years I have learnt a few tricks but the easiest method I have found to get them over their fear is to bath them lol, this year my yearling and the new 5 year old I got were both scared of the fly spray bottle, after a few days my older mare got better with it, and my yearling got worse.. so once it got warm enough I gave both of them their first baths which can sometimes be a challenge but I find they get over it quickly and helps desensitize them, and when they dry off spraying them with bug spray isn't a big deal, not sure if it will work for others, but it is defiantly my go to trick and have been lucky with my last few horses with the issues.
CAP is offline  
post #16 of 19 Old 06-21-2014, 04:22 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: North Dakota, USA
Posts: 3,440
• Horses: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXhorseman View Post
"I would kind of disagree with this, well, not that it works but that it is a good thing to do. That fly spy can be very irritating to the skin. Keeping it on the hair, without working it down to actual skin contact, will help keep flies away while minimizing skin absorbtion. Some of the chemicals are NOT good for any living thing. If I get the stuff on my hands, it kind of burns. I am very careful to spray my horse near his sheath (where the midges make him miserable) where there is plenty of hair and avoid the sheath itself , where the skin is thin and sensitive."

I agree with your concerns when using certain products. I would not use some products because of their toxic content. If the instructions say one should not touch anything after applying until one washes his hands, I would be hesitant to use the product even on the top coat of the hair. Do you know any horse that does not touch its mouth to its legs and body? I am more concerned with this than the product touching the skin.

I am currently using a homemade fly spray. It consists of one part Avon Skin-So-Soft, one part white vinegar, and two parts water. Some say to add a tablespoon of citronella oil. This spray seems to work about as well as any I've tried.

I've also heard of mixing apply cider vinegar with citronella oil.

Has anybody else found any effective and less toxic mixtures?
We've also did the skin so soft recipe. Ours included vinegar, citronella oil, Listerine, regular Dawn dish soap, and hair conditioner.

Around here, when the flies get bad, nothing seems to work well for any extended period.

As for the horse freaking out about being sprayed, I never tie a horse to get them used to being sprayed. I hold the rope and let them "escape" around me. Definitely use water first. Spray away from the horse and turn to them while spraying. When they move, try to stay that same distance until they stop moving. Turn back away and start over but each time you repeat, you should end up closer at actually spraying them.
Posted via Mobile Device
usandpets is offline  
post #17 of 19 Old 06-21-2014, 12:45 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Missouri
Posts: 3,727
• Horses: 3
Horse has learned to do this because you aren't making him quit it.

Get hold of lead and tell horse to stand still, period. Get after horse if it continues to act up, like you mean it, not a soothing or babying attempt.

Horses will do whatever handlers let them do.

Horses make me a better person.
Palomine is offline  
post #18 of 19 Old 06-22-2014, 10:30 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 15
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Palomine View Post
Horse has learned to do this because you aren't making him quit it.

Get hold of lead and tell horse to stand still, period. Get after horse if it continues to act up, like you mean it, not a soothing or babying attempt.

Horses will do whatever handlers let them do.
First, she's asking for help with getting him to accept the spray, not bullying him into being scared of HER. Again, nobody said she was babying or soothing him. Please.

I think you may have developed a relationship where your horse thinks he can get away with misbehaving like that-I think you should go back to basics and get help with getting him to trust you and see you as the leader, no matter what. I wouldn't attempt to "tell the horse to stand still,period" until you've worked on getting him to respect and trust you in a non-threatening situation
eburnham is offline  
post #19 of 19 Old 06-23-2014, 10:42 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Central MS
Posts: 1,380
• Horses: 2
well, I can see getting after him if he is rearing and being dangerous -- that shouldn't be tolerated
But ... it might be a little hard to coordinate that kind of reaction in a timely way that shows the horse that rearing is a problem -- I know that I lack that sort of coordination


Imho, get a few spray bottles full of water (so you aren't wasting good fly spray) and just keep spraying --- stay out of the "i just might get injured zone" and keep spraying like nothing is going on --- spray the entire bottle --- grab another bottle and do the same thing --- do it over and over until the horse gets used to it and ignores it

Note -- make sure you aren't spraying it in the face
jmike is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Scared of fly spray?!?!?! RezaluteSupreme Horse Grooming 10 10-11-2013 03:56 PM
Fly spray Mandy1 Horse Health 13 07-07-2013 11:36 AM
my horse is scared of spray bottles? lovejewel Horse Training 4 06-18-2013 04:06 PM
Fly spray bakercar Horse Health 10 07-10-2012 03:18 AM
Fly Spray Rosebud64 Horse Health 11 04-15-2010 08:59 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome