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Seperating A Horse

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  • "skin a cat"
  • Should i separate my horses so they aren't herd bound

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    12-05-2012, 05:07 PM
  #11
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlideStop    
She is rearing, biting and kicking at you so your separating her for that?? I'm not really sure what point of separating her is. Unless a horse is not focused on you when separated from their herd I don't see a reason to separate them, as in turning.them out separate from the herd for the sake of it. If she is on paddock time she is going to be a horse, kicking her friends running, calling, etc. Especially young horses! If she is freaking that bad you will probably make a more herd bound horse later on in life.
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I seperated her because her attention was not on me, I put her back today, she is better now, and not rearing biting or kicking. She is not herd bound, at least when I am there, but when I work with her, it is in with the other horses, and they start running around, then she wants to run around with them. That is the only reason I seperated her, so her attention would be on me at all times. She seemed to have learned her lesson... for now.

Also, she wasn't freaking out that bad, just neighing and running around. When I went to check on her this morning, she was fine, nice and calm and not responding to the others. And came trotting over when I called her, like usual.
     
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    12-05-2012, 05:15 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunderspark    
I seperate mine in the spring for short periods of time, since they have most of the winter off to be with the herd they get pretty herd bound. So I will seperate them like I said for short periods of time and work with them to get them focusing on me and not what the others are up to.....honestly I don't think it hurts them to be by theirselves sometimes. My now 3 /12yr. Old gelding was brought out in the yard with me since the day he was born by himself, I think it did him a world of good not having or wanting to be with the others all the time......just my opinion....
don't get me wrong, in my book any herd bound horse gets a one way ticket to a private suite! Being separated is a GOOD thing. Let me explain a little more now that I have a computer infront of me. This 2 year old is (when she is not acting naughty) fine being separated. She does whatever nicely and focuses on her handler with out fussing about going home. Then you take her an put her in a paddock and leave her to her own devices, alone. Now she starts looking and thinking "OMG, they are over there, I'm over here, they are going to leave without me, somethings is wrong here" then becomes worked up over it. Then her handler comes back and finally turns her out with her herd and the horse is like "wow, thank god I'm back. I was scared there for little while, pheew". Now next time my fear is that horse is going to remember those NEGATIVE feelings about being taken away and it MIGHT set her up to start worrying about it more, like when her handler is working with her. I'd rather build up the time and show them that separation IS ok than having to deal with a horse who needs to run it out for 5 hours. You can build on those positive experience because the horse never has worried about being away from the herd.

Just my two cents, for whatever its worth. There is always more then one way to skin a cat.
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    12-05-2012, 05:49 PM
  #13
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlideStop    
don't get me wrong, in my book any herd bound horse gets a one way ticket to a private suite! Being separated is a GOOD thing. Let me explain a little more now that I have a computer infront of me. This 2 year old is (when she is not acting naughty) fine being separated. She does whatever nicely and focuses on her handler with out fussing about going home. Then you take her an put her in a paddock and leave her to her own devices, alone. Now she starts looking and thinking "OMG, they are over there, I'm over here, they are going to leave without me, somethings is wrong here" then becomes worked up over it. Then her handler comes back and finally turns her out with her herd and the horse is like "wow, thank god I'm back. I was scared there for little while, pheew". Now next time my fear is that horse is going to remember those NEGATIVE feelings about being taken away and it MIGHT set her up to start worrying about it more, like when her handler is working with her. I'd rather build up the time and show them that separation IS ok than having to deal with a horse who needs to run it out for 5 hours. You can build on those positive experience because the horse never has worried about being away from the herd.

Just my two cents, for whatever its worth. There is always more then one way to skin a cat.
Exactly, 100% spot on.

I've got a gelding that was seperated from the herd as a youngster at the stud he was bred at. Now whether it is due to this, or other factors, he now has shocking seperation anxiety. It is taking me a long time to try and get him settled. I can now work him alone, without other horses in sight, but if a horse comes past he will lose his head for a few minutes wanting to be with them. Its a very gradual improvement.
In the paddock, he would kill himself before he settled down and got over being on his own. I have had him hurling himself at fences, and rearing over the top of stable doors trying to get to other horses.

My 2 year old has grown up with a small band of others his age, and over the last year has been in the paddock with one other youngster, and swapped between the youngster and the old horses.
If he's left on his own, he is 100% fine, he knows the others will come back, he is not stressed in the slightest.
     
    12-05-2012, 06:05 PM
  #14
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Breezy2011    
I seperated her because her attention was not on me, I put her back today, she is better now, and not rearing biting or kicking. She is not herd bound, at least when I am there, but when I work with her, it is in with the other horses, and they start running around, then she wants to run around with them. That is the only reason I seperated her, so her attention would be on me at all times. She seemed to have learned her lesson... for now.

Also, she wasn't freaking out that bad, just neighing and running around. When I went to check on her this morning, she was fine, nice and calm and not responding to the others. And came trotting over when I called her, like usual.
If she wasn't paying attention to you obviously she isn't taking you seriously and you need to step your game up. Make it worth her while to listen. It's not like she was so panic stricken she wasn't able to pay attention. This "time out" method is probably going to give you bigger problems in the end. I'm sure you we see my logic above.
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    12-05-2012, 06:19 PM
  #15
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlideStop    
don't get me wrong, in my book any herd bound horse gets a one way ticket to a private suite! Being separated is a GOOD thing. Let me explain a little more now that I have a computer infront of me. This 2 year old is (when she is not acting naughty) fine being separated. She does whatever nicely and focuses on her handler with out fussing about going home. Then you take her an put her in a paddock and leave her to her own devices, alone. Now she starts looking and thinking "OMG, they are over there, I'm over here, they are going to leave without me, somethings is wrong here" then becomes worked up over it. Then her handler comes back and finally turns her out with her herd and the horse is like "wow, thank god I'm back. I was scared there for little while, pheew". Now next time my fear is that horse is going to remember those NEGATIVE feelings about being taken away and it MIGHT set her up to start worrying about it more, like when her handler is working with her. I'd rather build up the time and show them that separation IS ok than having to deal with a horse who needs to run it out for 5 hours. You can build on those positive experience because the horse never has worried about being away from the herd.

Just my two cents, for whatever its worth. There is always more then one way to skin a cat.
I do believe in being positive with the horses, make their experiences positive, when I said I would bring my little one out in the yard it was always when I was out there to keep an eye on him, he would follow me around watching what I was doing. During the summer I fence off our yard and the horses are let out during the day to cut my grass for me LOL not that there is much left with five horses running around on it. When he was little he was bad for walking through the gates and coming out on his own LOL I had to put ropes through the gates because he was always out in the yard while the others were in the pasture......some people say I spend too much time with my horses but I do believe it shows in them and they respect me as their leader.
We've just started Street who is now 3 1/2 (he is off for the winter now though) and I want to take it slow with him and make his experience with someone being on him good......no I don't believe a horse should be shut off by himself for hours on end, first off they don't understand what they did to have the time out but it's funny with mine they know when they aren't supposed to be playing around with my BBQ lid it's funny how they all scatter when they hear me coming LOL I LOVE MY HORSES!
     
    12-05-2012, 06:39 PM
  #16
Green Broke
Totally Thunder, as long as your there its cool.... Keep them.out all day ;) I ment to factor that into my post that you were there with them. I'm glad you got my angle on this! Hah
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    12-05-2012, 07:52 PM
  #17
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlideStop    
Totally Thunder, as long as your there its cool.... Keep them.out all day ;) I ment to factor that into my post that you were there with them. I'm glad you got my angle on this! Hah
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I got your angel :)
So long as people are treating their horses well, not putting them in harms way I am all for it.....it's people who neglect or abuse their horses I don't agree with.....you sound to me like you in the first group!
     
    12-06-2012, 06:53 AM
  #18
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Breezy2011    
I seperated her because her attention was not on me, I put her back today, she is better now, and not rearing biting or kicking. She is not herd bound, at least when I am there, but when I work with her, it is in with the other horses, and they start running around, then she wants to run around with them. That is the only reason I seperated her, so her attention would be on me at all times. She seemed to have learned her lesson... for now.
Just to clarify, you want her to not rear, kick or bite at the other horses or at you? If it is the behavior to the other horses while in the pasture, I doubt you ever will unless you are there all the time or always have her isolated. If its towards you, yes, it needs to be corrected.

I do think you are going about it wrong, if it's towards you. Don't isolate her and then work her around the loose horses. First, working her in with the other horses is a recipe for an accident. It will also be more difficult for her to keep her attention on you. Young horses have a short attention span in the first place. Work her away from the other horses so it is easier for her to keep her attention on you. As she gets better, you can work her near the others but don't work her in with them.

Trying to eliminate the behavior when she is out with the others is next to impossible. It's the way they communicate and a part of establishing herd dynamics. It's also the way they play. You can isolate her but anytime you would introduce her to other horses in a pasture, the other horses will do that behavior to her to show her that they are above her in the pecking order. She will return the behaviors to challenge for their positions. That's just horses being horses.

Personally, I would work her away from the other horses and then tie her away from them for a while, like an hour to digest what you worked on. Afterwards, turn her out with the others for her to be herself. If she displays bad behavior when you work her, correct her and she will learn that it is not acceptable when she is with you but she can behave like a horse with the others.
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    12-06-2012, 05:16 PM
  #19
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by usandpets    
Just to clarify, you want her to not rear, kick or bite at the other horses or at you? If it is the behavior to the other horses while in the pasture, I doubt you ever will unless you are there all the time or always have her isolated. If its towards you, yes, it needs to be corrected.

I do think you are going about it wrong, if it's towards you. Don't isolate her and then work her around the loose horses. First, working her in with the other horses is a recipe for an accident. It will also be more difficult for her to keep her attention on you. Young horses have a short attention span in the first place. Work her away from the other horses so it is easier for her to keep her attention on you. As she gets better, you can work her near the others but don't work her in with them.

Trying to eliminate the behavior when she is out with the others is next to impossible. It's the way they communicate and a part of establishing herd dynamics. It's also the way they play. You can isolate her but anytime you would introduce her to other horses in a pasture, the other horses will do that behavior to her to show her that they are above her in the pecking order. She will return the behaviors to challenge for their positions. That's just horses being horses.

Personally, I would work her away from the other horses and then tie her away from them for a while, like an hour to digest what you worked on. Afterwards, turn her out with the others for her to be herself. If she displays bad behavior when you work her, correct her and she will learn that it is not acceptable when she is with you but she can behave like a horse with the others.
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This is good advice, but lets get something straight. I was only seperating her so I could work with her alone. I do not want to work with her in the pen with the other horses. That is why I seperated her. Later on in the night, I realized I don't need to seperate her for a long time, just while I am working with her. She was only left by herself for a few hours. I am working her in another pen, although I do not leave her tied up for a long time because I don't have the time as I board her at a cattle farm.

When that pen is not available, I HAVE to work her in with the other horses.
I had a trainer come out the other day, and I think I will stick with her advice.

I appreciate it though.
     
    12-06-2012, 06:21 PM
  #20
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Breezy2011    
This is good advice, but lets get something straight. I was only seperating her so I could work with her alone. I do not want to work with her in the pen with the other horses. That is why I seperated her. Later on in the night, I realized I don't need to seperate her for a long time, just while I am working with her. She was only left by herself for a few hours. I am working her in another pen, although I do not leave her tied up for a long time because I don't have the time as I board her at a cattle farm.

When that pen is not available, I HAVE to work her in with the other horses.
I had a trainer come out the other day, and I think I will stick with her advice.

I appreciate it though.


... that's not what this says.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Breezy2011    
Also, she wasn't freaking out that bad, just neighing and running around. When I went to check on her this morning, she was fine, nice and calm and not responding to the others. And came trotting over when I called her, like usual.

Over night is just for a "few hours"? That's a new one in my book.

If your trainer told you to leave her out there, alone, over night I would suggest finding a new trainer! If it was your idea, doing stuff like that is a good way to create yourself more problems that will put you further out into the deep end.
     

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