Serious Issues. It's becoming dangerous.
 
 

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Serious Issues. It's becoming dangerous.

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  • My horse has become dangerous
  • How dangerous is horse training

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    01-28-2012, 05:32 PM
  #1
Foal
Serious Issues. It's becoming dangerous.

Okay, here I go.
I have a quarter-horse named Red, he was in professional training for 6 months or so before I got him. After that he was a show horse for me, and we brought him home. He was fine the first couple years then this past year he has been horrible, to the point where I'm scared he will do serious damage to me. I can't ride him because he takes off and the bit doesn't have any factor with it. I cannot take him out of the pasture because if I do and I try to take him back in he rears and strikes at my face. He does the same thing when he's nibbling on grass and I go to lift his head. He recently did this to my mom and the black smith while I was at school and I've had enough.
Today I tried to lunge him in the pasture and It was a whole new ball park. Yes, I use a whip but before I picked it up I make a clucking noise to try to get him to go and he refused so I walked him in circles and nothing happened. I lightly pushed him out and he reared so high I thought he was going to flip over. I'm scared for my safety and his, and I'm in desperate need of help.
Can anyone help me!? Or tell me where to begin on where to solve these issues because for the life of me I cannot tell anyone why he is doing this other than he is lazy.
     
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    01-28-2012, 05:44 PM
  #2
Showing
Yes, first, have him thoroughly checked over for pain by your vet. Once pain is ruled out, find the help of an experienced trainer.

There are things that can be suggested but with him already exhibiting such dangerous behavior, I would hate to suggest some action that would get you hurt.
     
    01-28-2012, 05:53 PM
  #3
Started
I'd have him checked everywhere you can, if it's become so extreme- have the vet check him for pain, get his teeth floated, maybe get a chiropractor out to re-align everything, get lots of second opinions and get your saddle fit checked out and then turn to a professional trainer.
     
    01-28-2012, 07:58 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
Check him out for pain or soundness issues, but I suspect he has gone downhill because a good trainer / rider has not kept him 'tuned up' and obedient.

Horses may be trained by a professional to a World Championship level. When an amateur or youth starts showing them, they start to go downhill -- gradually at first and go off the cliff shortly after that. That is what your situation sounds like.

Amateurs and youth exhibitors may be excellent riders, but most of them are not trainers. [A few are and just don;t want to become professional trainers and give up their amateur status by going public.] So, their horses gradually lose their sharpness and finally lose respect and may get dangerous when they found no meaningful consequences for the small infractions. That is where I think you are.

Most amateurs or youth exhibitors are well-served if they:

1) leave their horse at a trainer's barn so the trainer can keep the horse sharp and work with the exhibitor; or

2) Take the horse for a 30 day tune up a couple times a year or leave the horse there for a week before a big show.

Most trainers, like myself, think that most horses have just so many tune-up in them. Then, they get smart enough to learn what person is at the controls. At that point, the exhibitor either needs a new horse or needs to learn how to ride better and needs to learn how to keep a horse sharp.

If you want to try to 'salvage' this horse, you need to take it to the trainer that trained him in the beginning or find a comparable trainer and level with them and let them know exactly what this horse is doing. He may be able to come back or he may be too smart and will just run over you when you get him back. You will need to take a bunch of lessons on this horse if a trainer does get him back to good form.

I have seen this happen so many times I cannot count them. People pay a lot of money to buy a well-trained horse and then expect them to just stay that way without a good professional hand getting on them from time to time.

Horses just do not work that way. They will always go down to the level of the worst riding they are getting. Like I have said so many times here:
The poorest performance or behavior you allow is the best performance or behavior you have any right to expect.
     
    01-28-2012, 09:59 PM
  #5
Foal
My mom said she 100% agrees with your first sentence.
"Horses may be trained by a professional to a World Championship level. When an amateur or youth starts showing them, they start to go downhill -- gradually at first and go off the cliff shortly after that. That is what your situation sounds like."

She also agrees with this as well: "Amateurs and youth exhibitors may be excellent riders, but most of them are not trainers. [A few are and just don;t want to become professional trainers and give up their amateur status by going public.] So, their horses gradually lose their sharpness and finally lose respect and may get dangerous when they found no meaningful consequences for the small infractions. That is where I think you are."

As for me, I agree as well. Being in school still has taken away a lot of my time and since I no longer show him my ambition to keep up on his training. He's very smart, and that is the problem. It is a good and bad thing, right now it seems to be going in a downward spiral! He has always had problems with his back because he was dangerously malnourished before we bought him but he's on supplements for and personally I see improvement.
I really don't want to say names to whose barn we left because in case someone knows her I wouldn't want to offend anyone but it was more about the, and I wasn't in a comfortable environment and neither was my horse. My lessons would be spent walking in a circle because she was on the phone, so there's wasted money and were paying her phone bill. Yay! Either way it's scary for me and I don't have the patience to deal with it.
cowgirlup07 likes this.
     
    01-28-2012, 10:03 PM
  #6
Trained
Sounds like you know what you meed to do then.
     
    01-28-2012, 11:59 PM
  #7
Started
I hope that you see, from Cherie's explanation, that it's rather unfair to the horse if you don't want to get your savvy up! It paints a sad picture: "oh, he's bagging out & getting dangerous again; time to ship him off to trainer for a tune-up". Your horse needs you to savvy up & be there for him, & if you don't have the interest, please let him go, to someone who does!
     
    01-29-2012, 12:39 AM
  #8
Trained
Take him back to a trainer, this is past the point where it's safe for you to try to fix it.
Ray MacDonald likes this.
     
    01-29-2012, 06:03 AM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
I hope that you see, from Cherie's explanation, that it's rather unfair to the horse if you don't want to get your savvy up! It paints a sad picture: "oh, he's bagging out & getting dangerous again; time to ship him off to trainer for a tune-up". Your horse needs you to savvy up & be there for him, & if you don't have the interest, please let him go, to someone who does!

A sad picture? Okay, I take blame for him being like this, I haven't put my foot down, my fault completely. It's rather rude to insinuate that I'm neglecting my horse. I love him and he will be going no where. I cannot apologize for having a separate life that needs attending to as well. I understood Cherie's post, and that is not what it meant. That horse is 17 years old and happy being a complete goofball to me when he's under control or else I wouldn't have bought him. It's like a child/mother relationship. The child may be bad and act up but its the mothers job to realize its a mistake that needs to be fixed.

So yes, he's going to a trainer. ASAP. It's just very hard with me in school etc. Is there any natural remedies I can give him to calm him down? He lets me handle him I just can't ride, lead out of the pasture or lunge him.
     
    01-29-2012, 06:29 AM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
I hope that you see, from Cherie's explanation, that it's rather unfair to the horse if you don't want to get your savvy up! It paints a sad picture: "oh, he's bagging out & getting dangerous again; time to ship him off to trainer for a tune-up". Your horse needs you to savvy up & be there for him, & if you don't have the interest, please let him go, to someone who does!
this is very rude. I was in school once with horses and yes mine went downhill too in riding, does this mean I also was neglecting my horses??? (BTW at that time I ran a rescue and also trained outside horses to pay for the rescues feed hay etc.) when you are limited for time its very hard to keep up with everyone and everything every single day. There were a couple of my personal horses I was riding every day and they even slacked until breaks off school.

This is not like one horse I trained, a paint gelding 4-6 years old according to the owner 3-4 according to his teeth. I spent 1/2 the time feeding him up because he was thin then started training, the owner knew. At the 30 day mark he came to ride his horse, the horse did great for me and then continued so for his owner. Keep in mind I had told this man that the horse bucked so hard his rear came up and over ON TOP OF ME 2 days before, he said "oh he's fine, you've done a wonderful job!" I recommended another 30 days but he said no and took his horse home, left him sitting for nearly 30 more days got on him and got thrown. He shot the horse on the spot because his own stupidity. This would be the kind of thing to be rude to the owner about NOT being in school and the horse slacking due to it. After reading what is going on, this was not done purposely and the horses owner IS trying to fix it and CARES enough about the animal to go about things CORRECTLY. Ok I think I'm done with my rant now.

Sparkyintention: Your doing the right thing by agreeing and sending him to a trainer, it will save on hospital and vet bills as both of you are in danger. It may not mean much coming from a stranger, but, I'm proud of you for doing the right thing for your horse!
     

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