She Always Tries Something
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

She Always Tries Something

This is a discussion on She Always Tries Something within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • What is correct she always try or she always tries?

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By beau159

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-22-2012, 11:51 AM
  #1
Yearling
She Always Tries Something

So my pony never bites me or anything. But she always seems to be waiting for the moment that my guard is down. This is only when saddling, mind you. She's quite girthy, always has been. But since I've had her, I haven't let her get away with touching me at all, so she doesn't. But whenever I tighten the girth, her ears go back a little, then she turns her face to bite me, but as soon as I look at her, she looks away. If she gets too close, I smack her away, and she moves her head away for a moment before trying again. She never bites me, but she always thinks about it. And I can't punish her, because if I smack her, it doesn't phase her and she just turns away then back again.

Is this a behavior I should treat the way I have been?

How should I properly handle this?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-22-2012, 12:06 PM
  #2
Showing
She isn't making the connection as to why you are smacking her. When cinching, try an elbow flap every once in a while with your left elbow. She might bump it once but likely not again. Be sure to do this every time you cinch as a reminder. Don't be concerned if her ears turn back, that's her way of paying attention to what is going on behind her head. She may also have been turning so she can see what you are doing with both eyes, not necessarily to bite.
     
    01-22-2012, 12:19 PM
  #3
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
She isn't making the connection as to why you are smacking her. When cinching, try an elbow flap every once in a while with your left elbow. She might bump it once but likely not again. Be sure to do this every time you cinch as a reminder. Don't be concerned if her ears turn back, that's her way of paying attention to what is going on behind her head. She may also have been turning so she can see what you are doing with both eyes, not necessarily to bite.
No, she pins her ears, it's not a 'listening' sort of back haha. And it's unmistakably an attempted bite. And I do that elbow thing, but no matter how any times she gets 'bumped' she just turns back around and tries to bite again.
     
    01-22-2012, 12:52 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Does her saddle fit her well?

Has she ever gotten rubbed by the girth?

Are you cinching her up slowly, or yanking on it? And/or only cinching her up "snug" first, and then tightening it the rest of the way before you are ready to ride, after you've hand walked her a few steps?

I always look to MY behavior first to make sure I am not doing something to cause discomfort (which I why I kind of ask "how" you are cinching her up). And of course we always want to make sure this is a true behavior problem, and not her acting out because something hurts somewhere.

After you can rule both of those things out, THEN you can look at how to fix a strictly behavioral issue.

Personally, I don't have a problem with a horse pinning their ears while being saddled, if that's the only thing they do. Some horses are girthy so I just do the best I can from my end to not jerk the cinch as I am tightening it. I also will wait to tighten it fully until I have hand walked them around a little bit to relax them, before I'm ready to ride.

However, I agree that she should NOT be turning her head toward you and thinking about if she is going to bite.

Another tactic you can try, since smacking her nose once doesn't seem to do the trick, is that you can give her unwanted excessive attention. As you are cinching her, every time she start to turn and look at you, quit cinching and go to rubbing her head and nose excessively. We want this to be to the point where you rubbing and scratching her head and face is much, much more annoying to her than if she stood quietly and allowed you to cinch her up.

Of course, be very careful that you do not get bitten if she is threatening to do so. If she does indeed go for the bite, that deserves one HARD smack to the nose to "bite her back". Then go back to cinching. But if she is not actually going to bite you (and just thinking about it instead), the annoying head rubbing/scratching might be enough to prevent her from even looking at you while you cinch her up. Again, I think it's totally fine if she pins her ears as long as she is not looking at you while she does so.

So just more or less something else you can give a try. Of course, whatever you do, make sure it is 100% consistent all the time. If that means you have to pay attention 200% to her while saddling, then that's what you'll have to do.
Northern likes this.
     
    01-22-2012, 04:10 PM
  #5
Started
Could be:

1. Horse has "cinch baggage", even though you're cinching in 3 snugs & walking in between.

2. You're giving her "cinch baggage" by not doing the above.

If 1., "woo" her: stroke her, show her that you understand that someone didn't cinch right before you, & that you're going to make it as comfortable as possible for her.

You can also give her a cinch lesson: increase her tolerance by standing away from her with a Western saddle on, & the latigo just looped once through the ring, & slowly snug & release, to tell her that you understand her concerns, but that it's not that bad. (like holding up a foot for cleaning/farrier isn't that bad).
     
    01-22-2012, 04:14 PM
  #6
Yearling
^I ride english and only have an english saddle. The barn I board at is largely a hunter/jumper barn so all the available saddles would be english as well.

It's not pain, I'm almost positive. Her grand dam, her sire, and her uncle were all girthy too.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0