She wont stop putting her tongue over the bit - Page 3
   

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She wont stop putting her tongue over the bit

This is a discussion on She wont stop putting her tongue over the bit within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        03-09-2014, 09:17 AM
      #21
    Showing
    Check her back. If she is uncomfortable that may be how she is expressing it. She didn't fuss when your mother was on. Was she bareback or saddle? Is she lighter than you. Perhaps she was more balanced and not creating one-sided pressure.
         
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        03-09-2014, 10:21 AM
      #22
    Yearling
    One bit I really like for a number of reasons is the so-called Spanish Snaffle AKA Port-Mouthed Kimblewick, which essentially has a mouthpiece like a Port-Mouthed Pelham and slotted D-rings so you can set the level of curb action you want between very mild and mild. We used that on a horse who habitually got his tongue over snaffles (wasn't really comfortable in snaffles) and he was really happy working with that bit. Horses and bits can be a pretty individual thing, dependent on both horse and rider. The most important thing is to have something that's not irritating to your horse (not pinching the lips or too hard on the bars of the mouth or digging into the roof of the mouth or just an uncomfortable shape for a particular horse's mouth), and which allows you to communicate well and in a nuanced way.

    Some horses are happier bitless (halter, bosal, hackmore, etc etc), which can be just fine especially for trails, pleasure riding etc. Sometimes that's just the way it is, often that's because people's hands aren't quite as soft with bits as they should be.

    The best book I personally ever read on the subject of bits was by the late Australian horseman Tom Roberts, called "Horse Control and the Bit." It's a really informative, intelligent read studded with anecdotes and case studies, which also debunks quite a few bit myths. Although now out of print, Tom Roberts books can still be occasionally found on e-bay etc. I've read a lot of horse books in my time but his are amongst my all-time favourites for training horses, riding horses, understanding horses and getting the right gear for a particular horse to be comfortable.

    Speaking great horse books, I also recently read "Horse Watch - What it is to be Equine" by Marthe Kiley-Worthington and thought that was a really interesting, very detailed book well worth recommending to others.
         
        03-09-2014, 10:59 AM
      #23
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    Check her back. If she is uncomfortable that may be how she is expressing it. She didn't fuss when your mother was on. Was she bareback or saddle? Is she lighter than you. Perhaps she was more balanced and not creating one-sided pressure.
    She did fuss when my mom was on. Until I started lunging her at a fast trot and changing directions every half circle to circle. She was under saddle both times. This is a habit of hers, she did it with the old owners/trainers too. And the girl who started her is equine major. To her, it is like cribbing in a sense. She has been seen. Her teeth and back are fine. She is sound. My mom also weighs around the same as me. So it isn't weight. And my mom is very novice. My seat, balance, aids, are all better then hers. She is very clumsy with aids, and slow to release pressure if not told when..
         
        03-09-2014, 06:04 PM
      #24
    Green Broke
    Checking for holes is good (in addition to other things I believe). There are holes if she forgets what yielding is. Maybe nerves too, which you could also attribute to holes.

    Have you done all her training? Do you have an experienced friend or trainer? Even hire a trainer short term? Sometimes an extra pair of eyes may have some good advice and see something you do not.
         
        03-09-2014, 07:39 PM
      #25
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Yogiwick    
    Checking for holes is good (in addition to other things I believe). There are holes if she forgets what yielding is. Maybe nerves too, which you could also attribute to holes.

    Have you done all her training? Do you have an experienced friend or trainer? Even hire a trainer short term? Sometimes an extra pair of eyes may have some good advice and see something you do not.
    I have not done 90% of it. So no. I wont hire anybody, one because money. And secondly because I bought her as something for me to train. And I don't mind going back and fixing mistakes others have made with her. I have an experienced friend who is a trainer, and gives me the advice. Etc. Basically now she just needs taken back to square one. Because if theres one hole, theres probably a lot more. And I am in no rush. I have lots of time to work with her.
         
        03-09-2014, 08:18 PM
      #26
    Green Broke
    OK. I was thinking more along the lines of you had. If you know what you're doing you should be fine. I was simply thinking if there were holes left *by you* (cause no ones perfect :)) that it may be easier for outside eyes to spot them.

    Sounds like you are on the right track!!
         

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