Should I switch to a snaffle? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 24 Old 09-17-2008, 09:09 PM
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Bill, Do you use a bit with swivel shanks or do you have solid ones. Both my horses came with the dreaded tom thumb bits. I don't like them either. I do like the Billy allen mouth pieces I'm just not sure what kind of shanks to get. (my horses neck rein)

Sorry if I'm hijacking your thread Darylann...I'll give it right back!

http://www.horsetackinternational.co...l?currency=USD

I have a bit like this I have been wanting to try. I'm not sure about the lack of port with the roller. I was looking for opinions before I landed my butt in the dirt.

Be strong and courageous, and do the work. Don't be afraid or discouraged by the size of the task, for the Lord God, my God, is with you. He will not fail you or forsake you.

1 Chronicles 28:20








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post #12 of 24 Old 09-17-2008, 09:25 PM
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Hi Amy, My shanks are "S" shaped, swivel and with the type of mouth piece, as you know, they also move back and forth independently.

I've been using that bit for over a dozen years and I haven't had a horse yet that didn't go well in it.

I'll take a pic of it and post it tomorrow.

.... now, back to the thread!

I'm not arguing with you, I'm just explaining why I'm right.

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post #13 of 24 Old 09-17-2008, 09:57 PM Thread Starter
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don't worry about hijacking the post.

There's something here for everyone to learn from.. or for those with the knowledge (iride :)) to teach us about those bits :)

From your experience, Iride, are swivel shanks better than solid non swivel ones?

How can you tell, just by looking online if the shanks are swivel or not?
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post #14 of 24 Old 09-17-2008, 10:13 PM
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In a swivel bit there is a piece that comes out from the mouth piece that the shanks fit into. That is what keeps the shanks from pinching and allows them to swivel.

My bit has a hobble that is attached from one rein ring to the other to limit the amount of movement. The picture below has swivel shanks but no hobble.

Hope that helps.



(The above bit has a shank that sweeps back helping to minimize the effect of the shank length)

I'm not arguing with you, I'm just explaining why I'm right.

Nothing sucks more than that moment during an argument when you realize you're wrong.


It's not always what you say but what they hear.
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post #15 of 24 Old 09-17-2008, 11:05 PM
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Sorry but I forgot to mention that what I like about swivel shanks is that a mistake you make with your hands will be not be felt on both sides of his face/mouth. It also works so that a correction you make with one side will not be felt to the other side. None of this is possible with a grazing bit such as the one that Amy posted.

As with any shank bit, your horse needs to neck rein to use it properly.

I'm not arguing with you, I'm just explaining why I'm right.

Nothing sucks more than that moment during an argument when you realize you're wrong.


It's not always what you say but what they hear.
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post #16 of 24 Old 09-18-2008, 01:04 AM
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FWIW, the bit pictured at http://www.greattack.com/store/image.php?productid=944 is NOT a "correction" bit...a correction bit's mouthpiece moves (hinged or swivels) at the port or at the shanks or both (usually both)...the bit pictured is stationary in the horse's mouth, the bit moves as one piece, not independently with each rein...this bit is a "one hand only" bit. It also has a narrow high port which has no "tongue relief" and will act on the tongue as well as the horse's palate.
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post #17 of 24 Old 09-18-2008, 01:31 AM Thread Starter
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I'm pretty sure Montana knows how to neck rein... i would think if he came with that bit he should know.
Though I will experiment with everything once I get him.

I do like the concept of the swivel shanks...its like independent side movement right?

Since I ride english, is there a bit that would please both me and Montana? As in I can direct rein with the bit?

The one bit I thought of was the pelham, but that's supposed to be used with 2 sets of reins and not 1.

I did see another english bit (i think) that looked similar to a western bit, though I forget where I saw it and what it's called... I guess that's what happens when you ask your brain to function at 12:30am
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post #18 of 24 Old 09-18-2008, 01:33 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Poor
FWIW, the bit pictured at http://www.greattack.com/store/image.php?productid=944 is NOT a "correction" bit...a correction bit's mouthpiece moves (hinged or swivels) at the port or at the shanks or both (usually both)...the bit pictured is stationary in the horse's mouth, the bit moves as one piece, not independently with each rein...this bit is a "one hand only" bit. It also has a narrow high port which has no "tongue relief" and will act on the tongue as well as the horse's palate.
So is that good or bad?
And what type of bit would you call it?

I'm not positive on to what type of bit he has, i saw it, and that bit looks every similar (how it looks) to the one he had....
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post #19 of 24 Old 09-18-2008, 07:57 AM
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ooops, my bad. Horse Poor is correct. Without the port being hinged to the rest of the mouth piece it is not a correction bit but rather a very high port grazing bit. http://horses.about.com/od/bitsexpla...ectionbit.htm#

As for the swivel action of the bit I showed, the barrel in the center allows the shanks to move back and forth and the way it is joined to the mouth piece allows the reins to swivel left and right.

I'm not arguing with you, I'm just explaining why I'm right.

Nothing sucks more than that moment during an argument when you realize you're wrong.


It's not always what you say but what they hear.
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post #20 of 24 Old 09-18-2008, 09:58 AM
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Thanks for clearing all of that up. The bit I showed Appy, is called a low port grazing bit with a copper roller. It has shanks that are mounted to the mouthpiece solidly. From what I understand (not a lot when it comes to bits, I'm learning too) is that it is a rather mild bit and sometimes I have trouble keeping my hands as quite as I would like. So my thinking was that it wouldn't be sending as many cues to the horse when I was the one making an error. From what Iride posted about the swivel shanks being independenant...I believe I may have a flaw in my reasoning. It makes sense to me now that I would be sending a message to both sides of the horse's mouth instead of one shank. I can see how a swivel shanked bit would be more forgiving with that example. Please correct me if I'm still off track.


I think I found a bit similar to what Bill was using.

http://buysaddles.com/products/Dutto...-3998-144.html

Be strong and courageous, and do the work. Don't be afraid or discouraged by the size of the task, for the Lord God, my God, is with you. He will not fail you or forsake you.

1 Chronicles 28:20








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