Should I use a Hackamore???
   

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Should I use a Hackamore???

This is a discussion on Should I use a Hackamore??? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Should i ride in a hackamore
  • Should i use a bit or hackamore on my horse

 
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    06-12-2012, 02:26 PM
  #1
Foal
Should I use a Hackamore???

I own a 4yr old American Saddlebred that im currently training to become a jumper. I ride in a regular snaffle. He normally gives me a hard time bridling. I have discussed the bridling issue with the vet and he thinks it may be becuse his canine and wolf teeth have not come in yet. I was riding on sunday and he was relaxed and going well in a frame on loose reins. Well I think he saw a rabbit and tensed up and started and take off, so I pulled him up. Not sure if I did it too fast and took him off gaurd, but he reared up and flipped over ontop of me. Unfortuantley I was in a western saddle so the horn hit my leg. Thank god it's not broken. Well he has given me trouble bridling since I got him and was wondering if he would be more comfortable in a Hackamore. I've been told its harsher than a bit. But im not sure what to believe. Any suggestions on what kind of bit I should be using?
Greatly Appreciated!
     
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    06-12-2012, 02:52 PM
  #2
Weanling
Has the vet actually looked at his teeth? My first port of call would be to get a specialised equine dentist out to look at them, as he might have hooks or points that are causing pain in his mouth, leading to him rearing when you pulled him up sharply, and the reluctance to be bridled.

You could put him in a hackamore to see if it suits him, and this might temporarily cover up the issue, as his teeth wouldn't directly be affected. If his teeth are bad however, this won't solve the issue, and it will still be there if you ever wanted to bit him again.

Hope that helped!

P.S - Hope you're feeling okay after your fall!
     
    06-12-2012, 03:08 PM
  #3
Foal
Smile

Our vet around here is the dentist too. I got him 5 months ago and his trainer said around 3 months before that he had his teeth floated. The vet looked in his mouth but didnt really check for hooks. I never thought about hooks being the problem and will have him looked at right way! Thanks for the advice. And im feeling alot better now that I know its not boken!
     
    06-12-2012, 03:35 PM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by CapitalVendetta    
Our vet around here is the dentist too. I got him 5 months ago and his trainer said around 3 months before that he had his teeth floated. The vet looked in his mouth but didnt really check for hooks. I never thought about hooks being the problem and will have him looked at right way! Thanks for the advice. And im feeling alot better now that I know its not boken!
No worries Well I'd definitely get an appointment to have them properly looked at. If all is fine with them, I'd then get the vet to look at his back, and make sure that all his tack fits properly. Any form of pain could have caused him to rear like he did, and if his back/anything else is in pain, it could be what causes him to be reluctant to be bridled, as he would associate being ridden with pain.

If nothing shows up, then it would just be training. Work with him at giving at the poll, so he lowers his head when you touch his poll with your hand. The rear may have been a one time thing, but it should be taken very seriously if he ever shows any indication of doing it again, as it can be very dangerous, as you well know!
     
    06-12-2012, 04:34 PM
  #5
Foal
Do you think it could be his previous training if physical pain is ruled out? When the trainer had a younger person ride him outside so I could see how he handled it he would rear up alittle and the guy would kick the crap out of him... I didnt really like the way he rode him while I was their. He made it look like he was deadlegged. I've found from riding him everyweek that he is really resposive and soft on your hands. For a non hunter he responds alot better than an of the hunters I've ridden in the past.
     
    06-12-2012, 05:07 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Are you competing with this horse? The reason I ask is that only certain types of tack are allowed for competing, but if you're not competing right now you can try out several different things that aren't show-legal. You might try using just a regular halter with reins (in an enclosed space such as a small arena or roundpen) or a sidepull. These are both gentler than a mechanical hackamore and might give you a better idea of whether or not the bit/teeth are the main issue here.

Even if you're currently showing, you could still try it once or twice at home
     
    06-12-2012, 05:17 PM
  #7
Foal
Im not currently showing... I don't have an english saddle yet so im just trying to perfect his flat work. Thanks I will try a halter and lead first.
     
    06-12-2012, 05:56 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by CapitalVendetta    
Do you think it could be his previous training if physical pain is ruled out? When the trainer had a younger person ride him outside so I could see how he handled it he would rear up alittle and the guy would kick the crap out of him... I didnt really like the way he rode him while I was their. He made it look like he was deadlegged. I've found from riding him everyweek that he is really resposive and soft on your hands. For a non hunter he responds alot better than an of the hunters I've ridden in the past.
It could well be his previous training, although in my experience, it's heavy-handedness that is more likely to cause rearing than excessive pushing forwards. If the horse is being pushed forwards yet held back at the same time, this can cause them to rear, as their only option in their mind to escape is to go upwards.

If all pain is ruled out and he continues to rear, I would get a trainer in to help if you don't feel like you can handle the issue yourself, as it can be very dangerous, and if he realises rearing will get him out of working, it may became a habit, and it is one very difficult to break. I knew a horse that learnt that doing little mini-rears got her out of working correctly with her owner, so when he went to my boss and she didn't let her get away with this and continued to push her forwards, she would go into full-blown upright rears, and ended up slipping sideways and going through the school fence, with my boss on top of her. My boss was lucky not to be seriously injured, but got back on and continued to work her, and when she learnt that rearing got her nowhere, she soon stopped.
     
    06-12-2012, 06:00 PM
  #9
Foal
Im sure Vendetta was jerked around before... This is all I know about his bridling. He was either in a corkscrew or a double twisted wire. His tungue was tied down and he was in a German martingale.
     
    06-12-2012, 06:59 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by CapitalVendetta    
Im sure Vendetta was jerked around before... This is all I know about his bridling. He was either in a corkscrew or a double twisted wire. His tungue was tied down and he was in a German martingale.
This could well be why he rears, nowhere to go but up in his mind. Sorry if you've already said, but what do you currently ride him in, bit-wise? Also, when you get the vet to look at his teeth, you might want him to look for any scarring in his mouth, as those bits can be very harsh if they jerked him around in them, and if they scarred his mouth this could cause him pain, even with a less severe bit in his mouth.
     

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