Side Passing
   

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Side Passing

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  • Video: horse training side passing
  • Easy steps to side pass

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    03-04-2012, 06:55 PM
  #1
Foal
Side Passing

I am leasing a horse and I am wondering how to teach a horse to side pass. She doesnt really get the concept yet.
     
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    03-04-2012, 07:12 PM
  #2
Yearling
Prepare for a novel ;)
My trainer teaches her's to side pass, and she's told me how she does it -
Start by putting your horse's nose by a straight fence or wall in an arena. Obviously, you are riding. Be patient, as at first your horse will be frustrated! You need to press the leg opposite of the direction you want to go. (ex, right leg to side pass left.) If your horse tries to turn to one side, pull on the opposite rein. They can't go forward ... because thier nose is in a fence. You will be keeping your reins tight. *NEVER release your leg untill your horse moves sideways!* As soon as you feel your horse sidepass - not turn, but move sideways - release your leg, drop your reins, and praise praise praise!!!

After you have done this just once, walk a little circle. You don't want to nag or irritate your horse. Once you get back to the rail, do this again. I recomend keeping these training sessions to about 5 - 10 minutes at a time, based on how long your horse can focus. I would only do this with my 4 yr old maybe for 5 minutes. My 20 yr old, who can focus for a much longer time, I could do this for 10. It just depends on your horse.

Do this for several days, in short training sessions. Once you have MASTERED the rail (I don't mean after pulling him around once or twice, I mean you lay your leg and he moves!) then you can get just a little further away from the rail. Maybe about 5 steps back. Keep a contact on the reins, and push your leg. As your horse gets better, you can get farther from the rail. Then you can start sidepassing rails, logs, barrels, anything :)

Hope this helps!
karebear444 likes this.
     
    03-04-2012, 07:16 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by xJumperx    
Prepare for a novel ;)
My trainer teaches her's to side pass, and she's told me how she does it -
Start by putting your horse's nose by a straight fence or wall in an arena. Obviously, you are riding. Be patient, as at first your horse will be frustrated! You need to press the leg opposite of the direction you want to go. (ex, right leg to side pass left.) If your horse tries to turn to one side, pull on the opposite rein. They can't go forward ... because thier nose is in a fence. You will be keeping your reins tight. *NEVER release your leg untill your horse moves sideways!* As soon as you feel your horse sidepass - not turn, but move sideways - release your leg, drop your reins, and praise praise praise!!!

After you have done this just once, walk a little circle. You don't want to nag or irritate your horse. Once you get back to the rail, do this again. I recomend keeping these training sessions to about 5 - 10 minutes at a time, based on how long your horse can focus. I would only do this with my 4 yr old maybe for 5 minutes. My 20 yr old, who can focus for a much longer time, I could do this for 10. It just depends on your horse.

Do this for several days, in short training sessions. Once you have MASTERED the rail (I don't mean after pulling him around once or twice, I mean you lay your leg and he moves!) then you can get just a little further away from the rail. Maybe about 5 steps back. Keep a contact on the reins, and push your leg. As your horse gets better, you can get farther from the rail. Then you can start sidepassing rails, logs, barrels, anything :)

Hope this helps!
This would work great only she is western and thinks I am trying to get her to back up when I keep short reins and use leg pressure. So if she backs up, I then have to use different leg pressure to get her forward and then by that time we are both confused and fustrated.
     
    03-04-2012, 07:21 PM
  #4
Yearling
That's fine - When you are at the first stage - nose on the rail - you don't need that constant back pressure. Keep a loose rein, and only pull when she tries to turn. Ride two handed for this, untill you master the nose-on-the-rail stage :) Don't worry, she'll learn the diffirence eventually ;) My trainer trains all her babies Western, so trust me, it works :) And don't be frustrated ;) Just be patient. If she does back, walk her back up there, and try again.
     
    03-04-2012, 07:36 PM
  #5
Weanling
I'm going to try that myself. I have been trying to teach my mare this on the ground up against the arena wall and I haven't had any luck. The technique I was using was from a show that I watched and either it wasn't very effective or I was doing something wrong.
     
    03-04-2012, 07:41 PM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by karebear444    
I'm going to try that myself. I have been trying to teach my mare this on the ground up against the arena wall and I haven't had any luck. The technique I was using was from a show that I watched and either it wasn't very effective or I was doing something wrong.
I do think that working from the ground can solve a multitude of problems, and can train many things - I just don't think this is one of them. Sidepassing is just easier taught from the saddle, and quite honestly, I doubt you will ever need to sidepass from the ground :p
     
    03-04-2012, 07:45 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by xJumperx    
I do think that working from the ground can solve a multitude of problems, and can train many things - I just don't think this is one of them. Sidepassing is just easier taught from the saddle, and quite honestly, I doubt you will ever need to sidepass from the ground :p
Agreed thanks for sharing I'm going to try tomorrow after work. Can't wait to see if it works!
     
    03-05-2012, 09:11 AM
  #8
rob
Weanling
First thing moose,don't use the fence for a guide.like you stated,your horse wants to back cause it don't want to run into the fence.and jumper,apparently your trainer isn't that good if they can't teach a horse to sidepass out in the open.
     
    03-05-2012, 04:44 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob    
first thing moose,don't use the fence for a guide.like you stated,your horse wants to back cause it don't want to run into the fence.and jumper,apparently your trainer isn't that good if they can't teach a horse to sidepass out in the open.
So if I don't use a fence, how should I go about doing it?
     
    03-05-2012, 07:14 PM
  #10
Green Broke
I haven't taught a horse to sidepass myself, but this is a high-level overview of how it was explained to me: Starting from the ground, first teach them to yield fore and hindquarters, and then ask them to yield both at once. Then do the same under saddle.

As a side note, I've found that most people think their horses yield their fore quarters very easily, but then when you ask them to show it, the horse has no idea what they're asking for. It's an exercise that's not used nearly as much as yielding hindquarters (which if you're like me, you probably do several times in the course of a regular grooming session!), but it's an exercise well worth doing with your horse until he really has it down.
     

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