Sidepass grrr!
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Sidepass grrr!

This is a discussion on Sidepass grrr! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Do you pull back on the reins when you sidepass a horse

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    12-26-2007, 02:16 PM
  #1
Yearling
Sidepass grrr!

For some reason when I'm teaching my horse to do a sidepass she thinks it means go forward. Are you supposed to pull back on the reins too?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    12-26-2007, 02:33 PM
  #2
Started
If she consistently moves away from sideways pressure on the ground, it shouldn't be a huge leap to doing so while being ridden. If she already does this easily and you are still having trouble, try practicing facing a fence. Reward even one step sideways...she'll get the idea eventually.
     
    12-26-2007, 03:49 PM
  #3
Yearling
Yes I agree with sara, face her to a fence... hold your outside rein, open your inside rein, outside leg on the girth, or a little bit behind. Make sure you reward her, for the smallest step, the more plesent you make it for her, the more often she would do it Good luck :)
     
    12-26-2007, 03:57 PM
  #4
Started
Oh, I forgot to add, you shouldn't be pulling back (as you asked in your post), but holding with steady reins in the way Delregans described. Ideally, you can do a sidepass with a completely loose inside rein and your outside rein just holding. My instructor used to make me practice like that to make sure I wasn't "cheating" :P

I am guessing it is similar with western riding, but with even less use of the rein?
     
    12-26-2007, 04:17 PM
  #5
Started
Never put two different things into one. It's not good giving mixed signals. I agree with the fence thing. That's how I taught Blu.
     
    12-26-2007, 04:28 PM
  #6
Yearling
I have had success with the fence, although some horses I have had...if they can't go forward they back up. In this case horseluver, get someone on the ground with you just to help direct you horse.

Quote:
Ideally, you can do a sidepass with a completely loose inside rein and your outside rein just holding.
Yes I agree sara, you can. You can infact sidepass with no reins/bridel. That's alot of practise though, but something to aim for!!!
     
    12-26-2007, 04:37 PM
  #7
Started
It's funny! Blu on sidepasses to one side, the right. No matter what leg I use! So that is something for us to work on lol
     
    12-26-2007, 04:59 PM
  #8
Yearling
Oh really Ok that's weird... lol
     
    12-26-2007, 10:29 PM
  #9
Yearling
Ok I'll try the fence. I'm trying to teach her to spin for reining, but I figure I should get her to sidepass and get off my leg pressure first.
     
    12-27-2007, 01:55 PM
  #10
Weanling
Before sidepassing from the saddle, she needs to know how to sidepass from the ground. To sidepass, she needs to know how to move her shoulders and also how to move her hips away from pressure. Initially when you start teaching a horse you would focus on direct pressure on their shoulder to move the shoulder and direct pressure on the hip to move the hip. The sidepass puts those two cues together - one step over with the shoulders followed by one step over with the hips. Done simultaneously, you have a horse who can sidepass.

So when you are in the saddle, she needs be able to move her shoulders and her hips individually. Can she pivot on her haunches? Can she pivot on her forehand? If you don't have these skills yet, you aren't ready for sidepassing. Your leg cue at the girth moves her shoulders over for the pivot on the haunches. Your leg cue moved farther back, almost near her flank, moves her hips over to pivot on the forehand. One end at a time, one step at a time - shoulders, then hips, shoulders, then hips - will get her to sidepass. You leg cue somewhere in the middle of the individual cues to move her shoulders and her hips will eventually be the spot to cue for her to sidepass.

If you want her to spin for reining, you need to concentrate on getting her to pivot on her haunches while keeping forward momentum. Work on your pivots in small increments...a quarter of a circle at a time to start with. Then walk out of the pivot to help her keep the thought of going forward in her head. When you get better and better at this, you can increase the size of the circle (pivot) to 1/2 circle and trot her out of the pivot. Mix it up a little bit to avoid boredom.
     

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0