Sidepassing
   

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Sidepassing

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  • Sidepassing
  • What does it mean when a horse sidpasses

 
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    04-01-2011, 02:16 PM
  #1
Weanling
Sidepassing

I was going through some trail articles that showed probably 15 different trail show patterns. Of those, almost half included sidepassing. I looked up how to teach a horse to do it, and started work. It mentioned putting the horse up to the fence, putting pressure with the outside leg, loosening the inside rein, and thus creating "an open door" for the horse to move sideways, since forward wasn't an option. This has worked out fairly well, but I still need help. If I had the abiltiy to upload video, I would, and will try- but for now, words will have to do:

My mare will cross over in front, but simply follows with her back, creating a crescent shape. She will do it well on occasion, but not all the time. Also, she only does it well when up against the fence. Out in the open, she still doesn't quite understand.

Another problem I am having is her sidpassing to the left. She will do it okay to the right, but ends up going in circles while going left lol. How do I help this?

I am currently not too worried about the left, as I want her to understand the WHOLE concept one way at a time, hoping this will help.
I also did ground exercises with her today, by putting pressure on her hind and around where my foot would be with my fingers, and releasing when she moved over. This seemed to help alot.

Overall, I have her started, but please help me finish her!! Thanks so much!!
     
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    04-01-2011, 02:29 PM
  #2
Weanling
I taught mine this way: if sidepassing to the left, I would bring the right rein across their neck and as for a step crossing over the front foot by cue-ing with my right heel at the cinch. STOP as soon as the cross is complete and ask for the hind to cross to the left by cueing with right heel at the hip. Basically, cinch, hip, cinch, hip cinch hip over and over , gradually closing in the space between the cinch cue and hip cue until you're just in the middle, and they are crossing both ends. Lol, prob not the 'correct' way, but that's worked for me!
     
    04-01-2011, 02:41 PM
  #3
Green Broke
I've been doing the same as Brew is doing, there still quite a bit of issues, since he still isn't perfect with leg cues since I've just started teaching him them since winter break and since he didn't know them in the first place unless you kicked as hard as possible (not good).
I'm also having an issue with one side (can't remember at the moment, but he does them opposite..He'll do one side perfect on the ground, and horrible in the saddle, vice versa on the other side. :/ I've been working on only the bad side on the ground and in the saddle for now, and then I'll work on the good sides when he's good with that.
My guy also doesn't understand the concept too well unless he's avaunt the wall or fence, he seems to think I want him to go diagonal lol
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    04-01-2011, 02:50 PM
  #4
Weanling
I teach it on the ground first at a distance with my stick and using a fence. I get it going really well in both walk, trot and canter (if I can keep up - my draft has got this huge stride ) Before I do any sideways I teach the horse to yield both hip and shoulder from the ground and in the saddle. This has to be practiced a lot. Not drilled but it should become really automatic. Now once you've got all this working getting it in the saddle is easy. It is really better (at least I find) to not use the rein at all to begin with. Use your body, stick, and the fence to help your horse "get it". I find the bit/rein can get a horse focused on the wrong thing.
     
    04-01-2011, 02:59 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iseul    
I've been doing the same as Brew is doing, there still quite a bit of issues, since he still isn't perfect with leg cues since I've just started teaching him them since winter break and since he didn't know them in the first place unless you kicked as hard as possible (not good).
I'm also having an issue with one side (can't remember at the moment, but he does them opposite..He'll do one side perfect on the ground, and horrible in the saddle, vice versa on the other side. :/ I've been working on only the bad side on the ground and in the saddle for now, and then I'll work on the good sides when he's good with that.
My guy also doesn't understand the concept too well unless he's avaunt the wall or fence, he seems to think I want him to go diagonal lol
Posted via Mobile Device
Yea I know what you mean!!! lol

And thanks for the advice everyone!!

As to the above^^ how do I teach her to yeild hindquarters from the saddle...what is the cue? She reacts well to both neck reining and leg pressure. I can really do serpentines excellently and get her to move away from pressure, but it's my onw fault for not understanding "yeilding the hindquarters" and how that works...probably why she doesn't do it when I ask her to sidepass...go figure right? Lol
     
    04-01-2011, 05:24 PM
  #6
Weanling
I will try but I am not the best at explaining with words.

From the ground first:

You stand beside her and lift the rope up and drive her hind end away from you with your hand or stick. Look at her hip. She should not move her front end. It's easier if it's just a halter on and so if she moves forward you just gently ask her not to: move forward by blocking her a little with the rope - just jiggle it a little. She should get this pretty fast. Once she understands really well from both sides then you can start asking her by putting your hand on her belly between where your leg is and her hip.

From the saddle:

Lift the inside rein up towards your shoulder and look at her hip. Wait. If she doesn't move reach down with your hand and gently tap her on her hip. If she has learned it from the ground she'll get it in the saddle too.

But this is really better if you can see someone do it on a DVD or in person. I'll try to think of a DVD that would be good. You should try to search on utube for hind quarter disengagement. Anyway hope it helps.
     
    04-01-2011, 05:26 PM
  #7
Weanling
Gracias :) Much easier to understand now :) ^^
     
    04-08-2011, 09:07 PM
  #8
Foal
I have found that I like the results that come from teaching a horse to sidepass on the ground without a fence better than with one. It also gives you the opportunity to teach softness and giving to the halter along with moving forward or backward as needed. I like to stand in front of the horse and ask for the sideways movement by tapping with a stick or dressage whip. If the horse pushes forward hold the halter still. If he sucks back, same thing and continue to tap the rib area. Take your time and watch as the horse starts to understand and then give.
     
    04-09-2011, 09:16 AM
  #9
Weanling
OoOo...I like that idea^^^ :) Much easier to control ALL the movements...why didn't I think of that?
     
    04-09-2011, 09:19 AM
  #10
Foal
With my horse to move his butt over I took a dressage whip and when I crossed my right to the lefts side (sidepassing left) I tapped the right side of his butt, if he didn’t respond I tapped a little harder.
     

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