Slow down at trot - Page 3
 
 

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Slow down at trot

This is a discussion on Slow down at trot within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        01-15-2008, 09:52 PM
      #21
    Showing
    Draw reins, when used correctly are a very useful tool. They are meant to show your horse's nose the way to the ground, not to prevent impulsion. Unfortunately, a lot of people use them incorrectly, with both draw reins tight so the horse can't move forward.
    I have used draw reins before with a horse that didn't seem able to grasp the idea of a frame, and it helped wonders, only had to use them for a couple weeks, then he held a frame consistantly. They are not to be used by someone that doesn't know how to use them though...!

    By the way, great point, Delregans Way. I feel the same about see-sawing, and have the bad experience to put behind it as well.
         
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        01-15-2008, 11:55 PM
      #22
    Yearling
    My horse was trained to back up when you see-saw. If I pull both reins as you normally would he just raises his head and won't back. Even if I do give and release like pick up the reins, release, pick up, release very gently slowly working to steadier contact he either opens wide or raises his head up. I have to gently alternate. He's extremely light so really I just have to wiggle my finger once or twice alternating between each rein and he's already backed up a dozen steps. I mostly ride with halters and rope halter hackmores rather than bits. My horse isn't a big bit fan and is rather ill-responsive. I trust him more with a halter than I do with a snaffle.
         
        01-16-2008, 12:01 AM
      #23
    Yearling
    Quote:
    draw reins, when used correctly are a very useful tool. They are meant to show your horse's nose the way to the ground, not to prevent impulsion. Unfortunately, a lot of people use them incorrectly, with both draw reins tight so the horse can't move forward.
    I have used draw reins before with a horse that didn't seem able to grasp the idea of a frame, and it helped wonders, only had to use them for a couple weeks, then he held a frame consistantly. They are not to be used by someone that doesn't know how to use them though...!

    By the way, great point, Delregans Way. I feel the same about see-sawing, and have the bad experience to put behind it as well
    Yes your right, they can be useful...in the right hands though. I have never used draw reins on my horse though, cause really bend and flection should come from behind, not in the hands.
         
        01-16-2008, 12:12 AM
      #24
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Delregans Way
    Quote:
    draw reins, when used correctly are a very useful tool. They are meant to show your horse's nose the way to the ground, not to prevent impulsion. Unfortunately, a lot of people use them incorrectly, with both draw reins tight so the horse can't move forward.
    I have used draw reins before with a horse that didn't seem able to grasp the idea of a frame, and it helped wonders, only had to use them for a couple weeks, then he held a frame consistantly. They are not to be used by someone that doesn't know how to use them though...!

    By the way, great point, Delregans Way. I feel the same about see-sawing, and have the bad experience to put behind it as well
    Yes your right, they can be useful...in the right hands though. I have never used draw reins on my horse though, cause really bend and flection should come from behind, not in the hands.
    thats the kind of thing I was getting at in my post about getting them to do things naturally and the right way but as usual, I don't explain myself well sometimes :)
         
        01-16-2008, 10:17 AM
      #25
    tim
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Delregans Way
    ...should come from behind, not in the hands.
    The classic response. :roll:
         
        01-16-2008, 03:30 PM
      #26
    Yearling
    Quote:
    The classic response.
    And the truth... :roll:
         
        01-16-2008, 05:43 PM
      #27
    tim
    Weanling
    I just don't understand why you would think to make a horse bend and flex its body with draw reins... They're for the head.
         
        01-16-2008, 08:00 PM
      #28
    Showing
    Thank you, Tim...
    I agree, horses should work from the hind end, but the need to come up and underthemselves through the back, then comes the head and neck. Draw reins are useful for showing your horse's nose the way to the ground; they're a tool used to crate the correct frame in the neck. If a horse has the resemblance of a giraffe (head waaaaaay up in the air) then you might want to consider draw reins, as they just guide your hrose into the correct frame.

    You can achieve this many other ways, however I found with my gelding that he would not hold a frame no matter what kind of bending and flexing I did, so I resorted to draw reins, and they worked wonders - and definitely didn't stop his impulsion... my sig pic (the one below my posts) is one of him doing an extended trot (taken at a funny time though!) with draw reins on. He is not behind the vertical, does have a nice frame, and is most definitely working from behind, with a good amount of impulsion. This was back when I was first training him to extend.
         
        01-16-2008, 08:54 PM
      #29
    tim
    Weanling
    ^^ exactly.

    Oh, and guys, I don't know if you all noticed, but there's a thread on draw reins in the "Horse Tack & Equipment" forum if anyone wanted to discuess the matter further. It's already a few pages long.
         
        01-16-2008, 09:09 PM
      #30
    Yearling
    Quote:
    thats the kind of thing I was getting at in my post about getting them to do things naturally and the right way but as usual, I don't explain myself well sometimes
    haha don't we all :roll:
         

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