Slowing down her lope!! Help!!
   

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Slowing down her lope!! Help!!

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  • Horse gets wound up at lope

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  • 1 Post By gssw5
  • 1 Post By oh vair oh

 
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    03-08-2014, 08:23 PM
  #1
Foal
Exclamation Slowing down her lope!! Help!!

Her walk and trot is perfect but when it comes to her lope it goes downhill...fast...she is western pleasure breed...anyways she holds the c shape but won't slow down!! Also her lope is very flat so how to pick up that shoulder and use her back legs more?!Thanks!!
     
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    03-08-2014, 08:28 PM
  #2
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natalierose    
Her walk and trot is perfect but when it comes to her lope it goes downhill...fast...she is western pleasure breed...anyways she holds the c shape but won't slow down!! Also her lope is very flat so how to pick up that shoulder and use her back legs more?!Thanks!!
She sounds like she isn't collected..
     
    03-08-2014, 08:50 PM
  #3
Weanling
I don't train or ride pleasure horses so maybe this isn't the advice you want but Larissa is on the right track.

Before a horse can slow down it needs to go faster and get used to using itself properly. Impulsion and forwards drive is key to lifting the shoulders and driving from behind.

She shouldn't be racing around strung out either but don't focus so much on slowing down right now. Start off asking her to move out but take a feel with your hands and don't let her bomb off. The key is to feel her driving from behind, and you'll feel the shoulders lift as she does.

Once she is carrying herself properly with some collection you can focus on slowing down and shortening her strides.
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    03-08-2014, 09:10 PM
  #4
Weanling
The best way to slow a lope is lope, lope and lope some more. You don't say how old she is. If she is young she may still be trying to figure out how to balance with a rider, if she is older maybe she never learned how to lope because she has not done enough loping. I like to find a long sandy trail and lope usually they will start out fast but will slow down if you go for long enough, usually within 5 or 10 minutes. She will learn to slow down on her own, she will come to realize she does not know if she is going for 5 minutes or 5 miles and will learn to conserve herself. Once she learns on her own how to balance and slow down then you can teach her to collect and work off her hind end. If you are in an arena lope using the same idea, but try to just be a passenger and don't over steer her, try to not touch the reins at all so she learns to be responsible for her own feet. She may duck, dodge and get stuck in corners but keep her moving by applying pressure as needed, otherwise leave her alone. Vertical collection comes after they learn to balance.
Foxtail Ranch likes this.
     
    03-08-2014, 10:22 PM
  #5
Weanling
Exactly. She has to find her balance. Loping enough will teach her, well she will teach herself it is easier to do once she uses her body correctly. She will also become more balanced. Then you start teaching collection.
     
    03-08-2014, 10:32 PM
  #6
Started
What is the "c" shape? Are you talking about a canted lope?

Consider your horse may not have the conformation to go as slow as you want. Pictures and video would help.

There's so much that goes into a western pleasure lope - genetics and training. It's hard to give you a full detailed run down on the internet. I suspect that her jog/trot is probably not perfect if she is having these issues at the lope..
GotaDunQH likes this.
     
    03-09-2014, 10:40 AM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by gssw5    
The best way to slow a lope is lope, lope and lope some more. You don't say how old she is. If she is young she may still be trying to figure out how to balance with a rider, if she is older maybe she never learned how to lope because she has not done enough loping. I like to find a long sandy trail and lope usually they will start out fast but will slow down if you go for long enough, usually within 5 or 10 minutes. She will learn to slow down on her own, she will come to realize she does not know if she is going for 5 minutes or 5 miles and will learn to conserve herself. Once she learns on her own how to balance and slow down then you can teach her to collect and work off her hind end. If you are in an arena lope using the same idea, but try to just be a passenger and don't over steer her, try to not touch the reins at all so she learns to be responsible for her own feet. She may duck, dodge and get stuck in corners but keep her moving by applying pressure as needed, otherwise leave her alone. Vertical collection comes after they learn to balance.
She is 6
     
    03-09-2014, 05:36 PM
  #8
Yearling
^ Please post a vid! Going slow involves SO much, but basically comes down to 3 things:

1. Mindset
2. Conformation
3. Trainining

What you stated in your brief post says to me....your horse is on the forehand, your horse is not engaged in the hind-end, and your horse is not using it's body at all....which comes down to training and improper riding,

People get all wound up over rate of speed, especially when it comes to going slower for the jog and lope. IF YOUR GET THE HORSE TRAINED AND RIDDEN CORRECTLY....so the horse is using it's body and the rider is asking the horse to use it's body; the rate of speed at the jog and lope will fall into place given the horse's conformation and mindset.
     

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