So...she bucked...what do I do now?
   

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So...she bucked...what do I do now?

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        02-12-2014, 06:38 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Angry So...she bucked...what do I do now?

    The horse I posted about me thinking threatening to buck finally did it...my sister and I were riding around in the pasture so the other horse was loose, just following us around. But she fell behind so she cantered past to catch up and the horse I was riding tried to follow her into a canter, so naturally I pulled her back, and that made her decide to buck! I flipped off the side of her, got back up and walked up to her and got back on. I rode around for a while after that to prove to her that she isn't getting out of work by doing that. She was trying to go to the corner where we had a bit of food leftover from their morning feeding. I was riding with a rope to slap her across the butt everytime she stopped and wouldn't get going again. (she's the stubborn one) and that worked really well. By the end of our ride, I would click, she would go about half of the time, then if she didn't I would start swinging the rope from side to side without actually hitting her and she would get going. She was being the perfect little angel horse right up until the buck. Now I am kind of wary about riding in the pasture again but the only other place I can ride right now is a gravel road, which will definitely hurt a lot worse than landing in a snow bank in the pasture. If the snow hadn't been there when I fell off, I would be hurt as I fell on my head. I don't know what to do to prevent her from doing that again. I can't lunge her in the snow, can I? There is not much ground work I can do with her since the only place I could do it is covered in snow and has two other horses in it so that would have to wait until Summer or Spring. I feel really nervous because it all happened so fast, fine one second and I was on the ground the next, it wasn't like she was sending me warning signals before, she just kind of decided she wanted to be done and acted on it. I have no idea what to do!!
         
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        02-12-2014, 06:45 PM
      #2
    Green Broke
    Why can't you lunge her in the snow? They walk and run in the snow on their own, there is no reason you can't work her in the snow. In fact it will be harder work for her.
    Horses always buck for a reason and it is seldom because they are trying to hurt you or get the better of you. The fact that she did not start doing it again when you got back on is proof enough.
    The other horse running past may have gotten her excited and so she was kicking up her heels.
    If you pulled back too hard without warning or caused her confusion/pain this may have caused her to go up as well. The best think in that situation is not to haul back on their mouths but either bend her or try a pull & release method to get her attention back on you. Next time you may be more prepared now that you are aware of it.

    Also, were you cantering before? How was she? Did you canter after?
    I know with my mare she has back issues that flare up every now and then and needs the chairopractor out every so often or else she will buck when we lope. And ONLY when we lope.
    natisha and Northernstar like this.
         
        02-12-2014, 06:50 PM
      #3
    Yearling
    Ebony, it sounds like you did the right thing, getting back on and riding.

    If you must ride in the pasture, tie the other horse up. It can practice patiently standing tied while you ride the other horse.

    Also, I advise spanking behind your leg instead of the rump. Sometimes horses will kick out or buck from a spank on the butt! Also, I like to use the "squeeze, cluck, spank" progression when a horse refuses to go. Squeeze with you legs. If she doesn't go, make a sound that means go for you. If she still doesn't go, spank her. Don't threaten to spank. You want her to go at the lightest cue, so you need to be consistent.
    natisha, boots and CowboyBob like this.
         
        02-12-2014, 06:52 PM
      #4
    Green Broke
    I suggest you tie up or secure any loose horses away from you when you ride. And be sure you wear a helmet.
    Set yourself & your horse up for success. You both sound kind of green so keep things as uncomplicated as possible.
         
        02-12-2014, 07:13 PM
      #5
    Weanling
    These guys have given good responses, IMO. I also agree that you can lunge in snow, just be careful there is no ice below the snow. I'm sure she meant no harm to you, just feeling good! If you're out riding where there's snow it must have been a nice day out :)
         
        02-12-2014, 07:18 PM
      #6
    Green Broke
    As others said, tie the loose horse up. It takes a good horse to not want to buck or run off when a loose horse goes tearing by.
    Another quick word of advice, don't pull back on both reins when that happens, pull the nose one way or the other. Keep forward movement you can control, a very small circle.
    Don't be scared of him, you know what caused him to buck. If you know the cause and you know how to prevent it you have the power to stop it. Also, yes, you can lunge in the snow. But don't do endless circles trying to wear him down. Switch directions often and as soon as he is paying attention get on, trying to wear one down before riding only makes the horse stronger and it will take more and more time before you get on and even at that he still may not be paying attention.
    draftgrl, natisha and Ian McDonald like this.
         
        02-12-2014, 10:14 PM
      #7
    Yearling
    There are precursors and warning signs. It's just that it sometimes requires taking some wrecks for a person to start getting sharper about seeing them!
         
        02-12-2014, 10:54 PM
      #8
    Showing
    It is instinctive to run when another horse goes tearing by. This is how horses have survived for millennia. Run now and ask questions later.
    twolucid and madyasmkey like this.
         
        02-13-2014, 10:59 AM
      #9
    Foal
    So, does anyone know how to train a horse not to want to run or buck when another horse runs by? I guess tying her up would work, but she would flip! And I would rather be able to not worry about her bucking or trying to run. The horse my sister was riding didn't even blink! She is super good so I know there must be a way to train them to not care! Or to get the other horse to stop running while we are riding? I don't know...I really want to get this fixed by the time the snow melts though because falling off hurts a lot worse when it is on solid ground! Haha!
         
        02-13-2014, 11:12 AM
      #10
    Started
    You are fighting against INSTINCT, as Saddlebag said....which means the horse has little to no control over their reaction. Some horses are more reactive than others. Some horses lift one ear when they get scared, some run a mile before they stop to look at whatever scared them.

    If your horse knows you are a secure leader, it MAY react a bit less. Otherwise, whatever THAT horse is running from, I probably should, TOO!!! Is what they think.

    You need to work on FEELING the signals of a buck, like tension in the horse's back, etc., and DO NOT let the head go down. As soon aas you start to feel the head lower, pull ONE rein so the horse makes a circle.

    Good Luck!!

    Nancy
    AQHAlove, piglet, Yogiwick and 1 others like this.
         

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