so what does a mouthing bit actually DO? - Page 2
 
 

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so what does a mouthing bit actually DO?

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  • How two tie back horse on training roller
  • How long to tie a horse head in for mouthing

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    12-21-2012, 10:11 AM
  #11
Trained
Almond Joy that looks like a lovely bit, something to consider if I can find one in her size.

I long lined her today [again in the single jointed full cheek, because that's what's on her bridle] and she started off confused as hell but once she figured it out she long lined like an old pro. She's giving to the bit easily and willingly both laterally and vertically, good halt, good reinback. I think she's pretty much mouthed now... very very clever horse this one and I've been idly working on it the whole time I've been working on bridling her. I have done it before and while I did it in fewer sessions with the previous horse, the previous horse was a lot quieter and didn't need quite as much of a baby steps approach.

The biggest challenge with mouthing Magic was that to begin with she would panic as soon as any pressure was put on the bit. It took her a while to figure out that it wasn't going to eat her.

The vet-dentist actually advised to leave her wolf teeth be unless I encounter an issue. They are quite small and while they are a little forward of her molars vet-dentist said they are high enough in her mouth that the bit should not go anywhere near them anyway. Next time I have her teeth done [she is due in 3 months] I will have the vet reassess.

Dulcify, what is wrong with a French link? She has a fairly low palate and I'm therefore not really a big fan of a single jointed snaffle on her [just using it because it's the only full cheek snaffle I have - though I don't think she needs the full cheeks again until I set to work backing her and even then only to remind her]... and as she is intended to be a dressage horse she NEEDS a bit with independent action on both sides, which a mullen mouth lacks. They are available easily enough with oval links for the horse that dislikes the flat link.
     
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    12-21-2012, 07:03 PM
  #12
Foal
I prefer the round softer training links for breakers. It still has independent movement on each side but without the height, narrowness and pinching of the port of the French link. The French link is fine for horses with more experience under their belt.

If the horse has a low pallet then I would definitely not use a French link. The breaker should not be feeling bit pressure on their pallet, just tongue and bars.

I'm not sure how you mouth a horse but long reining is the last thing I do. It takes a good week for me to properly mouth a horse and I do it in consecutive days. I also tie back when mouthing. Some 'natural' people don't believe in it but I find they have better softer mouths.

While tying back they must always move forward and of course done at their own acceptance. Have ridden fresh breakers with other methods of mouthing and found their mouths lacking lateral softness.

When long reigning it's important to always check the steering frequently and watch what their mouth is doing and always maintain forward movement. I turn them to the outside of the circle to prevent falling in but since I have mostly dealt with tbs also prevents resistance and taking off.

Of course though I have already established this sort of long reigning in a halter so it's all old hat to them.

Getting them is the easiest part IMO. It's a great tool to use a lead pony so they get used to seeing someone above them.
     
    12-22-2012, 02:10 AM
  #13
Trained
There's no port on a French link though? Just a flat link in the middle. Regardless I personally prefer the oval link full stop. My gelding is in a flat link. Because he prefers it and salivates more but every other horse I have had has gone in an oval link.

I did make sure she understood giving laterally and vertically, halt and reinback before I put the long lines on. She isn't the first horse I have mouthed. Once I back her she will be taught the one rein stop but that is something I prefer to do mounted. Unfortunately backing her is something I can't do right away - vet advice was to leave that until around February so her injured leg has a chance to heal properly. If not for the laceration to her tendon she would be well enough healed now to start being backed but tendon injuries are obviously not to be taken lightly. I will probably leave it until march or even April to avoid the worst of the summer heat. She's young but she's bored and needs a job. I think light work a couple of times a week will be good for her.

Off to go work with her. Think if she's still long reining well in the round pen we might graduate to the paddock.
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    12-22-2012, 02:40 AM
  #14
Started
When using the full-cheek snaffle, you should also use the keepers with it. Many people are not aware of them. The bit doesn't function correctly otherwise and it is a safety concern.
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    12-22-2012, 06:12 AM
  #15
Trained
It sits better in her mouth without them? Regardless Im digging out my hanging cheek snaffle because after todays effort I feel like she's ready to graduate out of the 'mouthing' bit and the hanging cheek has that little bit of lateral pressure to help remind her.
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    12-22-2012, 01:25 PM
  #16
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhorselady    
When using the full-cheek snaffle, you should also use the keepers with it. Many people are not aware of them. The bit doesn't function correctly otherwise and it is a safety concern.
You're absolutely right!! So many people take those keepers for granted and ignore them, but otherwise the bit hangs down. If you hold the bit with two fingers on the rings, where the reins would be you'll notice the bit hangs pointing down, resting on what would be their tongue. If you put the top of the Full Cheek in the keepers the bit is held up, so if the horse has it's head in the correct position the bit won't barely touch them until pressure is added.
It also helps prevent the bit from getting hooked on things. This is why I always start my horses in french link full cheeks. It provides the clearest cues, with the pressure on their cheeks, bars and tongue without hitting their pallet or twisting incorrectly. :)
     
    12-22-2012, 01:41 PM
  #17
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
I agree with the theory that it gives them something to play with but I dislike them as they can often make the horse to ,mouthy and teach them to put their tongue over the bit.
This^^. I don't like for my horses to "play" with the bit as it often becomes a bad habit.

I guess I just subscribe to a different train of thought than most. IME, mouthing and playing with the bit leads to chomping and putting their tongue over it and chewing constantly. To me, those are vices. A horse that was trained properly should be quiet on the bit, not playing with it. A horse that is playing with the bit cannot feel the smaller cues given to them because they are constantly moving the bit in their mouth.

I've only ever used a nice loose ring snaffle on all my colts and always had good results.
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    12-22-2012, 08:04 PM
  #18
Foal
[QUOTE=blue eyed pony;1810168]there's no port on a French link though? Just a flat link in the middle. Regardless I personally prefer the oval link full stop. My gelding is in a flat link. Because he prefers it and salivates more but every other horse I have had has gone in an oval link.

I did make sure she understood giving laterally and vertically, halt and reinback before I put the long lines on. She isn't the first horse I have mouthed. Once I back her she will be taught the one rein stop but that is something I prefer to do mounted. Unfortunately backing her is something I can't do right away - vet advice was to leave that until around February so her injured leg has a chance to heal properly. If not for the laceration to her tendon she would be well enough healed now to start being backed but tendon injuries are obviously not to be taken lightly. I will probably leave it until march or even April to avoid the worst of the summer heat. She's young but she's bored and needs a job. I think light work a couple of times a week will be good for her.




The French link doesn't sit flat over the tongue which is why I don't like it for breakers.

The one rein stop should always be taught on the ground first. I've mouthed over a hundred young thoroughbreds so any questions don't hesitate to ask.

The key bits shouldn't encourage the horse to put the tongue over the bit, in fact the position of the keys encourage the opposite. I would always prefer a horse play a bit to much than not enough. I like them to really feel the bit.

If the bit fits properly and mouthing is accepted then this shouldn't encourage chomping, excessive play or putting the tongue over. Yes these are vices but rider caused vices.
     
    12-22-2012, 08:26 PM
  #19
Green Broke
Dulcify, I think you are confused. The french link will sit flat over the toungue giving plenty of room for the tongue and not hitting the roof of the mouth. There is absolutly no port in a french link.
A single jointed bit will hit the roof on a horse with a low pallete

Also Oldhorselady - Be careful with keepers on full cheeks, so few people use the keepers nowa days that a lot of newer full cheeks are designed for use without them and if you put them on the keepers will force the bit into a strange angle making it uncomfortable for the horse.
     
    12-22-2012, 10:41 PM
  #20
Trained
I would need a roller to teach her the one rein stop from the ground. We have one but it's my mother's and I don't like borrowing her stuff. I've just been long lining with a saddle on and the lines through the [run up] stirrups... little bit risky if they have a panic attack I know but it's what I have and what I've been using for quite some time with no issues.

I taught it from the saddle with my gelding to try to help deal with his bolting issue [which I caused] and he is now so familiar with it that all I have to do is lift one hand and he quits being an idiot.

A French link only sits with the edge against the tongue if it's an eggbutt and the horse's mouth is shaped a particular way. D-rings do the same. A full cheek with keepers would sit it flat, as would a hanging cheek. I have found that none of the horses I have had it on have been a fan of the full cheek placed in their mouths as if it had keepers though. [mine is single jointed but still...]
     

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