Solid jumps, a no no?
 
 

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Solid jumps, a no no?

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    11-10-2011, 08:39 PM
  #1
Started
Solid jumps, a no no?

So, I can't tell you how many times me and mother have argued over jumps. Yes, jumps.

My horse is pretty new to jumping, only been at it for about 6 months. Any way, when I he started jumping (lunging) I used cinder blocks, with a PVC pipe on them. When he hit the pipe, it of course came off. So he basically knew that he could pick and choose when to jump it, or when to not jump it, as it came off so easily. I know realize it was a terrible mistake, but I can't go back in time to train him differently. He got higher and higher with the lunge jumping until it was about 3 feet. He still picked and choosed when to jump (He jumped it about 7/10 times) So, when I started riding him over the jumps, I realized what a horrid, horrid thing had been done.

He would hit the pole when he was to lazy to jump it...

So, Starting small again and now trying to retrain him how to jump without knocking the pole, I filled the empty air under the jumps with stuff (buckets, blue barrels, pool noodles, anything basically) And he jumped it every single time, not missing one single jump when he realized that the jump was solid.

Okay, so here is where I first started off this thread. My mother looked at my jumps and renamed them "Death Jumps". Because they were solid. She said that if my horse hit one, we would both be on the ground. She said that a solid jump is dangerous. I argued with her saying that Jumpers use solid jumps, that in show jumping you see them jumping something completely solid, such as flower boxes, or gates and such (look here) She said that those horses are highly trained in jumping... Those horses at one point in time have to learn how to jump something solid, they need to learn that you can't hit the pole of a tiny, 3 foot jump. And so, they jump over solid things... (After my mum seen my jumps I am no longer allowed to jump anything solid that wont knock over if my horse hits it)

Anyway, anyway. So, now honestly tell me, is jumping over something solid bad? My jumps weren't bad at all, They were like so: Two blue barrels, with two buckets on the side, so a pole could be above them about 2 inches. Or, Two blue barrels on the side, with a pole resting on them, with only white buckets filling the space underneath... The barrels were secure, they were NOT going to roll anywhere, and the pole was heavy, it would fall straight down... Jumping over solid jumps the first day with him, he didn't hit them one single time... My mum says it only takes on accident, and I respect her ideas, and new rule...

Would you be jumping over solid jumps? With a horse who has been jumping about 6 months?
     
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    11-10-2011, 09:28 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
First of all, are you wearing a helmet? You should wear one that fits every time you ride but absolutely every time you jump for sure.

PVC poles are probably the most dangerous jumps you can jump. They are waaay too light. If a horse just barely touches one, it bounces forward and the horse can step on it and fall when it rolls out from under them. I have seen a couple really bad wrecks with PVC pipe that would never have happened with more substantial jumps.

Poles should be heavy wood poles. They drop straight down if they are rubbed while light ones bounce several feet forward.

I am a firm believer that every horse should learn to jump solid jumps. When I used to jump a lot, all of my outside jumps were solid ranging from 2' up to 2' 6". I used poles above those bases to make them higher. They consisted of logs stacked up, tree trunks from fallen trees, stacked firewood, corral pole fences made with big posts that could support added poles places in plastic jump cups and stacks of tires (stacked between solid posts) with a heavy pole on top.

The most unsafe jumping horses I have ever seen have been those that were taught to jump over flimsy jumps. They learn to let 'legs hang', learn to jump without lifting their knees, drag their hind feet over jumps and learn that they can knock all jumps down. This is truly dangerous. They learn to jump with bad form and develop bad habits that will stick with them forever.

While your mother has your best interest and your safety in mind, she is going to cause you to teach your horse to be an unsafe jumper. The only effective way to teach a horse to jump safely and use good form is to teach the horse that he has to respect the jumps he goes over.

Again, a safe jumper has to learn to lift his knees, fold his feet up high (not hang them down from his knees), arch his back so he can tuck up his hind feet and actually jump high enough to clear the fence.

Teaching him that he can barely drag himself over a fence or just plain crash through it will end up with both of you in a heap and a much greater chance of both of you getting hurt.
olympustraining and nherridge like this.
     
    11-10-2011, 09:32 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Anyway you can do both... make a jump look solid but not be ? Use the pole that will fall if he hits it but have stuff underneath like an inflatable raft or air mattress on its side. If the horse does actually hit it it will just fall over and satisfy moms requirements. But it will look like a solid wall to your horse.
     
    11-10-2011, 09:52 PM
  #4
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
First of all, are you wearing a helmet? You should wear one that fits every time you ride but absolutely every time you jump for sure.

PVC poles are probably the most dangerous jumps you can jump. They are waaay too light. If a horse just barely touches one, it bounces forward and the horse can step on it and fall when it rolls out from under them. I have seen a couple really bad wrecks with PVC pipe that would never have happened with more substantial jumps.

Poles should be heavy wood poles. They drop straight down if they are rubbed while light ones bounce several feet forward.

I am a firm believer that every horse should learn to jump solid jumps. When I used to jump a lot, all of my outside jumps were solid ranging from 2' up to 2' 6". I used poles above those bases to make them higher. They consisted of logs stacked up, tree trunks from fallen trees, stacked firewood, corral pole fences made with big posts that could support added poles places in plastic jump cups and stacks of tires (stacked between solid posts) with a heavy pole on top.

The most unsafe jumping horses I have ever seen have been those that were taught to jump over flimsy jumps. They learn to let 'legs hang', learn to jump without lifting their knees, drag their hind feet over jumps and learn that they can knock all jumps down. This is truly dangerous. They learn to jump with bad form and develop bad habits that will stick with them forever.

While your mother has your best interest and your safety in mind, she is going to cause you to teach your horse to be an unsafe jumper. The only effective way to teach a horse to jump safely and use good form is to teach the horse that he has to respect the jumps he goes over.

Again, a safe jumper has to learn to lift his knees, fold his feet up high (not hang them down from his knees), arch his back so he can tuck up his hind feet and actually jump high enough to clear the fence.

Teaching him that he can barely drag himself over a fence or just plain crash through it will end up with both of you in a heap and a much greater chance of both of you getting hurt.
Of course, I always wear a helmet (: Anyway, the PVC pipes were filled with sand, and I don't use them anymore anyhow, I use heavy logs. And everything you just said, I agree with 101%. What you said what almost word for word with my argument with her She says I can jump logs (I can jump logs but not a solid fence???) So I think Ill just jump logs if I can't use a solid fence, as IMO, I don't want to teach him that he doesnt have to actually jump, that he can just knock it over. He is already pretty sloppy with his feet, and with jumping solid things I would like to teach him to be precise with jumping, and not just sloppily do it. Thank you for your input!
     
    11-10-2011, 09:55 PM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
Anyway you can do both... make a jump look solid but not be ? Use the pole that will fall if he hits it but have stuff underneath like an inflatable raft or air mattress on its side. If the horse does actually hit it it will just fall over and satisfy moms requirements. But it will look like a solid wall to your horse.
Hmm... actually never thought of that We have rafts... Or I could hang a tarp over the pipe... and just hope it doesn't blow, and scare the bajebees out of my horse...
     
    11-10-2011, 09:58 PM
  #6
Foal
We would have those 3 or 4 inch PVC piping and paint them and put wood planks in them so they were heavy but safe.
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    11-11-2011, 10:48 AM
  #7
Showing
Your mom is being a mom. Horses do jump objects that appear solid. I hope the jumps are set well away from the fencing. The last thing you need is to come off and whack your noggin on a fence post.
     
    11-11-2011, 01:50 PM
  #8
Foal
I think the most dangerous thing going on here is you teaching yourself to jump without a qualified trainer to guide you and your horse along. And it doesn't appear that you mom has the expertise to help you either, though she clearly is concerned for your safety. Is there any way that you could have a coach out to your place to help you develop a proper training plan for you and your horse and to periodically come back to see how you are progressing through the plan and make corrections as needed?

You really seem to have a good head on your shoulders and your mom seems to provide good supervision. If you bring in someone who is an expert then you should be all set!

Good luck!
     
    11-11-2011, 09:27 PM
  #9
Foal
I'm a huge barrel fan. The horses have no trouble understanding them and the shape seems to help them round over the jump.
     
    11-12-2011, 07:32 PM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsandhorses    
I think the most dangerous thing going on here is you teaching yourself to jump without a qualified trainer to guide you and your horse along. And it doesn't appear that you mom has the expertise to help you either, though she clearly is concerned for your safety. Is there any way that you could have a coach out to your place to help you develop a proper training plan for you and your horse and to periodically come back to see how you are progressing through the plan and make corrections as needed?

You really seem to have a good head on your shoulders and your mom seems to provide good supervision. If you bring in someone who is an expert then you should be all set!

Good luck!
Unfortunately, when we got my horse It was kind of a unspoken deal that I couldn't have a trainer, due to money... I mean, paying for their feed, upkeep, vet bills, tack, and all that already made me dead broke... I have to but my own feed, and getting a trainer at this moment in time isnt really an option ): Although I would love one more than anything, I guess I'll have to make do! I'd rather have a horse and no trainer than no horse at all (:
     

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