Sorry, thread #2....BUT:
 
 

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Sorry, thread #2....BUT:

This is a discussion on Sorry, thread #2....BUT: within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Ss hinged ported roller futurity bit 5in on bridle
  • Ss correctional bit benifits

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    12-21-2011, 03:56 PM
  #1
Weanling
Sorry, thread #2....BUT:

Ok, I know I already posted a thread like this, but I'm going to ask the question again, just word it different. Do you think a correction bit is ok for my horse and can you use them on a daily basis? I've read that you should only use them for a short amount of time BUT like I said in my other post, Bob Avila speaks very highly of them, especially for younger/green horses. Bob Avila Correction Bit - Smith Brothers I think my horse might benefit from using one, but I just want other people's input on it. My horse is a 6 year old green paint horse gelding. The things I'm working on with him right now are: getting a good headset at the lope, getting the right leads, and getting a nice slow WP lope.
Thanks! And again, I'm sorry for posting this twice! (In fact, if an admin wants to, you can just remove the other one)
(Just a little reminder, I know that bits are not the solution to training problems...I just want to experiment with different bits with my greenie (: )
     
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    12-21-2011, 04:21 PM
  #2
mls
Trained
If you are not constantly in their face actually using the corrective action, I do not understand why you couldn't ride in the bit on a daily basis.
     
    12-21-2011, 04:23 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
If you are not constantly in their face actually using the corrective action, I do not understand why you couldn't ride in the bit on a daily basis.
Yeah! Seriously! He neck reins really well! (except most of the time I direct rein him while loping to the right, since he doesn't get his right lead every time, and it's kind of out of control...every other gait is fine though)
     
    12-21-2011, 04:28 PM
  #4
Weanling
This is just IMHO, but I would NOT use a correction bit on a daily basis for a green horse.
I try to stay in a snaffle bit (NOT a tom thumb which is a curb) 50% of the time, or more when Iím schooling or teaching something new (headset, speed, leads even flying lead changes) once the horse starts to Ďget ití with the snaffle bit, Iíll add a mild curb (low port swivel, like the one I posted on your other thread) and do the Ďfinishing touchesí with that bit.

I have a nice older show broke horse, so when I'm feeling like doing some 'refining' I will ride in a MILD curb bit for a couple days/weeks in a row, but I always like to go back to the snaffle before too long.

When Iím trying to slow my horse down for western pleasure (we do small classes, actually placed pretty well at our fair this year in it and beat some of the more expensive horses) I do a lot more work slowing him down with my seat than with the bit, but I try to ride the horse back to front even when slowing down. I find when you use bigger bits to get a horse to slow they often end heavy on the forehand.

I also LOVE experimenting with bits too though, and own about every type of bit there is, so I understand what you mean. Sometimes horses like and respond to different types of bits better. I don't think experimenting with a couple different curbs would harm anything.

Again, Iím not hard-core western pleasure so hopefully someone with more experience will be able to help you, but this is just my two cents.
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    12-21-2011, 04:31 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttatheBlue    
This is just IMHO, but I would NOT use a correction bit on a daily basis for a green horse.
I try to stay in a snaffle bit (NOT a tom thumb which is a curb) 50% of the time, or more when Iím schooling or teaching something new (headset, speed, leads even flying lead changes) once the horse starts to Ďget ití with the snaffle bit, Iíll add a mild curb (low port swivel, like the one I posted on your other thread) and do the Ďfinishing touchesí with that bit.

I have a nice older show broke horse, so when I'm feeling like doing some 'refining' I will ride in a MILD curb bit for a couple days/weeks in a row, but I always like to go back to the snaffle before too long.

When Iím trying to slow my horse down for western pleasure (we do small classes, actually placed pretty well at our fair this year in it and beat some of the more expensive horses) I do a lot more work slowing him down with my seat than with the bit, but I try to ride the horse back to front even when slowing down. I find when you use bigger bits to get a horse to slow they often end heavy on the forehand.

I also LOVE experimenting with bits too though, and own about every type of bit there is, so I understand what you mean. Sometimes horses like and respond to different types of bits better. I don't think experimenting with a couple different curbs would harm anything.

Again, Iím not hard-core western pleasure so hopefully someone with more experience will be able to help you, but this is just my two cents.
Thank you! He's not SUPER green. Like I said, the things we're working on right now are not super advanced stuff, but it's not basic either. He's in a tom thumb right now...A snaffle just isn't enough. Is there any bit you would recommend for me to use with him?
     
    12-21-2011, 04:41 PM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxGallopxx    
Thank you! He's not SUPER green. Like I said, the things we're working on right now are not super advanced stuff, but it's not basic either. He's in a tom thumb right now...A snaffle just isn't enough. Is there any bit you would recommend for me to use with him?
Hmm I rode my horse in a tom thumb for a while, are you having any issues with his head flipping, or trouble backing? My horse had both those issues with a tom thumb, and when I ended up switching to a low port bit they went away and he was much happier. I know tom thumbs that work well on some horses, but I know a lot of horses who don't like them either.
AT Low Port Loose Cheek Low Port Western Bit 5in - Statelinetack.com a bit like that one is a little milder than a tom thumb I think, because it won't pinch at all. It also swivels so you can pick up one side of the bit without having the whole bit move like a solid curb bit. I like this bit a lot, and it's a lot like my favorite curb bit I use with my horse.
     
    12-21-2011, 04:46 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttatheBlue    
Hmm I rode my horse in a tom thumb for a while, are you having any issues with his head flipping, or trouble backing? My horse had both those issues with a tom thumb, and when I ended up switching to a low port bit they went away and he was much happier. I know tom thumbs that work well on some horses, but I know a lot of horses who don't like them either.
AT Low Port Loose Cheek Low Port Western Bit 5in - Statelinetack.com a bit like that one is a little milder than a tom thumb I think, because it won't pinch at all. It also swivels so you can pick up one side of the bit without having the whole bit move like a solid curb bit. I like this bit a lot, and it's a lot like my favorite curb bit I use with my horse.
No, I haven't been having trouble with the tom thumb at all. I was just reading around in my Horse&Rider magazines the other night, and I saw the article: Gimmick free bits for colts. Or whatever, so I was like, wow! I think Joker might benefit from this! And I had been wanting to experiment with new bits for a while, I just didn't know where to start...I'm sort of a newbie when it comes to bits XD Thanks for showing that bit to me! The higher ports scared me a little, I think I may try this one! It even looks cool! (: Do you know if it's show legal though? I'm sure it is, but you never know. Thanks again! (: And is that a roller in the middle? If so, then YOU HAVE POSSIBLY ANSWERED MY PRAYERS.
     
    12-21-2011, 05:01 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxGallopxx    
No, I haven't been having trouble with the tom thumb at all. I was just reading around in my Horse&Rider magazines the other night, and I saw the article: Gimmick free bits for colts. Or whatever, so I was like, wow! I think Joker might benefit from this! And I had been wanting to experiment with new bits for a while, I just didn't know where to start...I'm sort of a newbie when it comes to bits XD Thanks for showing that bit to me! The higher ports scared me a little, I think I may try this one! It even looks cool! (: Do you know if it's show legal though? I'm sure it is, but you never know. Thanks again! (: And is that a roller in the middle? If so, then YOU HAVE POSSIBLY ANSWERED MY PRAYERS.
No problem! Yes that should be a roller my horse absolutely LOVES those! When we're working on something complicated, you can hear him squeaking the bit when he's concentrating. But other than that you don't hear it. I KNOW 100% this bit has a roller though: SS Hinged Ported Roller Futurity Bit 5in - Statelinetack.com It is a little stronger, with a longer shank.

What type of shows are you doing? I'm not sure about breed shows, but I did open, local and even 4-H shows with a bit similar to the above (with a longer shank) and it was legal there.

Bits are my unhealthy addiction, there are so many different types and little things that can change the whole bit. The main thing to remember with curb bits is the long the shank (bottom portion of side piece) the more leverage you have. Depending on how long it is, your 1 pound of pressure on the reins can translate to 3 pounds or more to the horse. The bit I showed you has a fairly short shank, so it won't be as harsh as other bits. The purchase (top part of the side piece that connects to the bridle) controls how much pressure is applied to your horses poll, which helps a lot of horses that are trained to give to pressure lower their heads.
The higher the port the more pressure there is on the bars of the horses mouth, and if it is VERY high it can touch the roof of the mouth. In addition, the looser a bit is (swivel shanks, swivel port, etc.) the milder it is compared to a completely solid port bit.

Haha I'll stop rambling but be careful, I started out with two bits when I first got my horse and now I have in the high teens. And I still only have one horse
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    12-21-2011, 05:06 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttatheBlue    
No problem! Yes that should be a roller my horse absolutely LOVES those! When we're working on something complicated, you can hear him squeaking the bit when he's concentrating. But other than that you don't hear it. I KNOW 100% this bit has a roller though: SS Hinged Ported Roller Futurity Bit 5in - Statelinetack.com It is a little stronger, with a longer shank.

What type of shows are you doing? I'm not sure about breed shows, but I did open, local and even 4-H shows with a bit similar to the above (with a longer shank) and it was legal there.

Bits are my unhealthy addiction, there are so many different types and little things that can change the whole bit. The main thing to remember with curb bits is the long the shank (bottom portion of side piece) the more leverage you have. Depending on how long it is, your 1 pound of pressure on the reins can translate to 3 pounds or more to the horse. The bit I showed you has a fairly short shank, so it won't be as harsh as other bits. The purchase (top part of the side piece that connects to the bridle) controls how much pressure is applied to your horses poll, which helps a lot of horses that are trained to give to pressure lower their heads.
The higher the port the more pressure there is on the bars of the horses mouth, and if it is VERY high it can touch the roof of the mouth. In addition, the looser a bit is (swivel shanks, swivel port, etc.) the milder it is compared to a completely solid port bit.

Haha I'll stop rambling but be careful, I started out with two bits when I first got my horse and now I have in the high teens. And I still only have one horse
Thank you so so so so so much OuttatheBlue! I won't be doing any humongous breed association shows or anything...Joker isn't registered.. But I will hopefully be doing 4-h and funshows soon! Depending on when I get a horse trailer (: I should've just PM'd you lol. Oh well, again, thanks so much!
Since the low port bit you showed me has a low port and shorter shanks, I think it should be ok to use on a regular basis....
     
    12-21-2011, 05:11 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxGallopxx    
Thank you so so so so so much OuttatheBlue! I won't be doing any humongous breed association shows or anything...Joker isn't registered.. But I will hopefully be doing 4-h and funshows soon! Depending on when I get a horse trailer (: I should've just PM'd you lol. Oh well, again, thanks so much!
Since the low port bit you showed me has a low port and shorter shanks, I think it should be ok to use on a regular basis....
No problem!! Have fun showing your horse! 4-H is such a great program
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