Speed Racer (not THE speed racer, tho) - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 23 Old 02-25-2013, 10:43 PM
Yearling
 
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Ok it sound like a learned behavior, not a balance issue necessarily. So I would try transitioning up slowly, ease her into the canter, let her hold it for a stride or two and half halt, transition down. Work that lead one stride at a time. It sounds like she's hauling herself around on her forehand. The half halts and transitions will shift the energy to the rear, where it belongs.

That's the best I can do without a video :)
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post #12 of 23 Old 02-25-2013, 10:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by palogal View Post
Ok it sound like a learned behavior, not a balance issue necessarily. So I would try transitioning up slowly, ease her into the canter, let her hold it for a stride or two and half halt, transition down. Work that lead one stride at a time. It sounds like she's hauling herself around on her forehand. The half halts and transitions will shift the energy to the rear, where it belongs.

That's the best I can do without a video :)
Wouldn't that also teach the horse to anticipate shutting down? To me, that sounds like a recipe for a horse to start sucking back. Wouldn't you want to teach the horse to /want/ to slow down?
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post #13 of 23 Old 02-25-2013, 10:50 PM
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She's dumping on the forehand and taking off...I think, that's what it sounds like to me. She needs to keep her focus on the hind end. She's not forward she's fast. Correct forward comes from behind, so the rider needs to keep the impulsion come from behind where the 'engine' is. That half halts and transitions will do that and make her correctly forward and she will be slower and properly collected.

Of course without a video, I can't really be sure that's what's going on, but that's what it sounds like to me given she's an Arabian, and high headed naturally, that's my best guess with the given information.
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post #14 of 23 Old 02-25-2013, 10:53 PM
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My horse Sky did this when we taught him to canter.. subbing :)

But what we did to help him out was slow our own seats down. Even him being "green" he picked up on it and would calm down after awhile. Kind of like putting more weight down when you post to change the rhythm of the trot.. do the same for the canter.

But still.. new to this so don't take my advice heavily.

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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post #15 of 23 Old 02-25-2013, 10:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel View Post
My horse Sky did this when we taught him to canter.. subbing :)

But what we did to help him out was slow our own seats down. Even him being "green" he picked up on it and would calm down after awhile. Kind of like putting more weight down when you post to change the rhythm of the trot.. do the same for the canter.

But still.. new to this so don't take my advice heavily.

That's a valid point too, what is your seat doing? Your seat should establish her rhythm. However, if she's learned to ignore your seat, this may not completely help.
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post #16 of 23 Old 02-25-2013, 11:05 PM
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I am riding a mare that does this. To the right she anticipates loping alot and when she does she launches. What I did was I convinced her that loping slower and relaxing is much easier.

I would jog a small circle then lope out with a loose rein. Lope a few strides then pull her into a small circle with the inside rein, let her break down to the trot (do not cue her, let her make the decision to trot). Jog her in the circle until she relaxes and lope off again. Keep a loose rein! She needs to make the decision to slow down. Eventually after enough times of doing this she will relax and slow her mind down.

Another idea is re-directing. I found this to be very effective in slowing their mind and legs down. Lope around in a square, try to make your turns as "square like" as possible and ask her to lope in a straight line. ONLY steer her when you turn, steer and release. If she starts to scoot faster, re-direct her again and send her off in a straight line.

Just a few ideas, goodluck!
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post #17 of 23 Old 02-26-2013, 12:52 AM Thread Starter
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I'm pretty sure my seat is fine. It feels fine, and I do have my trainer there with me. I've only noticed if my shoulders aren't square and I lean forward (one of my reallllly bad habits that I've been working hard on fixing, and coming along nicely, I think) she gets faster. I sit up tall and just take her in circles which just stays fast in. It isn't -horribly- fast, but it isn't the pace I'd like. She isn't that quick to the left. I keep my legs steady and heels down so not to misdirect her to go faster on accident. I think it is just her being her, just like with her leads. Like I said, she was pretty bad with that right one for a long time, but now she gets it right after almost every time. I think it is the same idea, it just takes work. I will try taking her into smaller and smaller circles until she is forced to trot next time I ride. I've yet to take that approach.

Any more tips?!

~He knows when you're happy
~He knows when you're comfortable
~And he always knows when you have carrots.
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post #18 of 23 Old 02-26-2013, 01:30 AM
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When you ride, breathe deep. Roll those shoulders, shake it out. You could be tense, and bracing due to anticipation, which transfers to the horse. The leaning forward will definitely cue to go faster.

Not sure if your horse will do better with this, but with my lease, when he wants to bolt on me, I have to pull his head around and do a ten meter circle. Nothing too small, but nothing to big either. I HAVE to do this until he lowers his head and relaxes into a nice gait.

Making sure the horse is collected prior to the gait you want to transition to helps a lot, too. Letting them rush into it means they will rush in the gait, too. So if you are asking for a canter, and they start rushing in the trot, transition down and try again.

Another trick I learned on my lease, which again, may just be how he is taught to cue, is say we are in circles to the left. I would squeeze my right reign back ever so slightly, giving a little more contact that my other reign, and bend his body into my leg as I press into him. I drive with my seat deliberately and he collects, rounds, and uses his butt.

I hope this helps!
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post #19 of 23 Old 02-27-2013, 12:36 AM Thread Starter
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I rode her today and tried a few things that really helped. The first was cuing her into the canter while trotting in a circle. This helped keep her slow, though after about a lap she was fast again and we had to keep circling. The thing that helped the most, I think, was collecting her, I think to the point she was overbridled, then cueing for the canter. She would then pop her head up enough to be in the correct position for collection and keep an even, smooth rthym. It was lovely. We were cantering over poles nice and steady. I'm def going to keep trying those things. When she got super fast (after a few laps) I'd stop and back her. She was perfect by the end of our ride.
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~He knows when you're happy
~He knows when you're comfortable
~And he always knows when you have carrots.
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post #20 of 23 Old 02-27-2013, 12:55 AM
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A while back, when I was teaching my horse to do spins, I noticed she'd spin well for my left side, and not my right, and thought it was odd, beings I'm right handed, and so was she. I then noticed, I was far better balanced turning in that direction...... I was a little Rusty.....lol
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