Speedy Jumper - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Speedy Jumper

This is a discussion on Speedy Jumper within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

    Like Tree2Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        05-14-2013, 12:23 AM
      #11
    Weanling
    Yeah, you are right. I see it all the time. I've suggested it myself, but only when I think, based on the reply of the OP, that is actually pertains. It really is a legit reason, but it isn't usually the problem.

    I have a lesson on Wednesday, so I'm going to see how she does. She may have just been super spunky that day because it wasn't as hot and it was windy. I'll try the pole and the walking over the jumps if she is still quick over and after them. Thanks!
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        05-14-2013, 01:09 AM
      #12
    Yearling
    Do not strike the trot or canter facing the jump. Instead, trot a small, half circle to the jump, then halt afterwards. Back a few steps, then either turn left or right and do it again. Change up the directions every time, sometimes skipping the back if she calms down, but always halt.

    Another method, do circles and dressage patterns throughout the arena, surprising her with a jump every once in a while. Make sure you're not approaching in a long straight line, or she'll catch on and anticipate. Similarly to the exercise above, make sure the jump seemingly comes out of nowhere, and afterwards, work and work and work on something else until she forgets about jumping. Once she's calm again, then you can try and jump again, repeating this process.

    The next method worked wonders for my old pony who got strong when the jumps got high. Keep in mind, this shouldn't be done every single jump. You could interchange it with the first exercise, too. As you approach the jump and you feel her start to build, turn and circle until she slows. Do figure 8s in front of the jump until she's calm, then jump.

    Another thing that helped, was I'd halt my mare if I felt her charge the jump, back her up very quickly, then jump from a standstill and halt before she took a stride away from the jump. Now this is like a slap in the face and I only used it if she was charging through my aides. Use this in extreme situations, as if to make a point. Then, resume circles or whatever and go back to the jump.

    Changing up their normal course of movement helps a lot. If she knows that heading straight for a jump means we're going to jump it, then barrel straight, or around a turn, she'll start to expect it and assume that's what's happening. If she has to keep guessing what path you're going to take, she can't rush as easily.

    Keep in mind, also, that rushing is not always a 'love for jumping' as many assume. It can be a result of fear, holes in training, and just simple disobedience. Do these exercises from a pole, to 12", to 18" and so on, gradually getting higher. Do not raise the height if she is quick.
         
        05-16-2013, 12:13 AM
      #13
    Weanling
    To everyone else who was having problems with this: I did find a solution. I can see the downside of it, but it actually worked. It was similar to what the person above me wrote. What I did is I would trot her towars the jump. As soon as we were within two, maybe even one stride, I'd pull her head to the left or the right and do a large circle. It really surprised her and she turned sharply a few times, trying to rush towards the jump but being surprised she didn't. I constantly kept her guessing as to what we would do. And I'd change direction. FOr the first jump, I'd circle her left, then go up to the jump again and circle left then go up to the jump again and circle right, then go up to the jump and actually jump it. She was smooth and slow. After she landed it was solid and slow. I changed it up at almost every jump, sometimes circling once, sometimes two or three times, sometimes not at all. By the end of my lesson she wasn't rushing the jumps even a little bit. I had good control.

    The only down side is to keep it changed constantly. She "refused" the jump twice because she thought we were going to circle. I circled her right back around to it and made her go over and she went over quite willingly. So the warning is to be careful you aren't teaching your horse it is ok to run a circle right in front of every jump. CHANGE. IT. UP! It really worked. By the end of the lesson we were jumping 2'3 oxyer with hay under it. We even did a hack line of a 2' to the oxyer.

    Good luck to everyone else.
         
        05-16-2013, 07:13 AM
      #14
    Weanling
    Awesome, I'll have to try that after school today. I'll let you know how it works for me. (:
         
        05-16-2013, 10:13 AM
      #15
    Yearling
    That's the very reason I advised not doing that every time! Lol they start to anticipate NOT jumping. However one thing I want to stress is they should only ever go where you tell them. That's the good result of the guessing game is they can't anticipate. If they turn away from a jump it should be because you told them. Similarly, she should jump it if you do tell her to.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        05-16-2013, 08:36 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Horsequeen08    
    What I did is I would trot her towars the jump. As soon as we were within two, maybe even one stride, I'd pull her head to the left or the right and do a large circle.

    So your solution is to train her to run out?
         
        05-16-2013, 08:42 PM
      #17
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    So your solution is to train her to run out?
    The idea is to keep the horse guessing and always listening. This doesn't train a horse to run out if you do it in the right way.

    However, if the mare was refusing jumps, maybe you should talk to a trainer.
         
        05-16-2013, 08:45 PM
      #18
    Trained
    The OP is getting the horse within one stride of the jump before "pulling her head to the right or left". Horse has been presented to the jump and promptly asked to abort. Not a good idea. While circling the horse within the vicinity of a fence to gain control BEFORE presenting the horse to the fence is very effective, what the OP is doing is not a good idea. I agree an instructor is in order here.
    tinyliny likes this.
         
        05-16-2013, 09:11 PM
      #19
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    The OP is getting the horse within one stride of the jump before "pulling her head to the right or left". Horse has been presented to the jump and promptly asked to abort. Not a good idea. While circling the horse within the vicinity of a fence to gain control BEFORE presenting the horse to the fence is very effective, what the OP is doing is not a good idea. I agree an instructor is in order here.

    I completely agree with MyBoyPuck!

    I would add ground poles in front of the jump to slow your horse down but it will help keep a rhythm and also do more grids and gymnastics.
         
        05-17-2013, 12:32 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    Ok guys, calm yourselves down. I warned in my post the downside of this, and I knew as soon as I posted it that people would be all over me about the "you are training your horse to be bad." Hence my giant change it up. I admitted that she "refused" because she thought we were circling, meaning that I wasn't changing it up enough. I was doing to many circles before the jumps. And when I took her back around and asked her for it, she jumped quite willingly. It is the SAME METHOD.

    She is anticipating the jumps, hence why I'm circling before hand. She is anticipating the circle, which is why I know now to not circle every time. Mostly I tried to only circle if I felt her speed up. So if she is anticipating the circle before hand, don't circle, jump.

    And my trainer was present.

    A second method I'd suggest to other people who have this issue is to try the first part of circling, jump the jump, halt (which will be much easier because the horse is already calm and not running quickly on the landing) circle back to face the jump (make sure you are about 2-3 strides away from the jump) and trot back over the same jump. This also helped.

    It not only slows her down, but you really do get more control all around. Just don't do it every single time. (I learned that the hard way, haha) by the end of my ride, everything was as it should be: slow horse and smooth jumps.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Speedy Horse jumpinggirl English Riding 3 04-10-2013 04:44 PM
    Speedy Horse -please help Standardbred Horse Training 11 11-14-2012 09:45 PM
    Speedy Pony LilDelilah Horse Training 3 11-18-2010 09:54 AM
    Mr. Speedy! jessiexcash Western Riding 2 03-21-2010 03:16 PM
    Speedy Jumper Horsegal16 Jumping 13 12-28-2009 03:36 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:14 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0