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Stallion Behavior

This is a discussion on Stallion Behavior within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        09-21-2011, 01:55 AM
      #11
    Yearling
    What exactly about Stallions make them so dangerous? I've read about how they behave, but what about them cause them to be for experienced owners only?
         
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        09-21-2011, 02:03 AM
      #12
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Deschutes    
    What exactly about Stallions make them so dangerous? I've read about how they behave, but what about them cause them to be for experienced owners only?
    They tend to be aggressive, hormonal, unpredictable, dangerous. Stallions also like to be the herd leader so they are more like to be dominant towards people and other horses. Plus there is the factor that they can potentially not hurt only other people but horses as well. Plus they can become hard to handle around mares in heat or to women when the have their cycle. I'm sure there is more but this is what I can think of right now.
    StacyRz likes this.
         
        09-21-2011, 02:28 AM
      #13
    Yearling
    Ah, so pretty much like a teenage girl.

    But in all seriousness, Could a horse who is not gelded, but also had not bred with a mare develop these behavioral issues?
         
        09-21-2011, 02:34 AM
      #14
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Deschutes    
    But in all seriousness, Could a horse who is not gelded, but also had not bred with a mare develop these behavioral issues?
    Yes, because regardless of whether they are bred or not, the hormones are still there. It's the hormones that make the stallion dangerous and unpredictable, not whether or not he's covered any mares.
         
        09-21-2011, 10:43 AM
      #15
    Super Moderator
    The one thing that holds testosterone levels down is running a stallion in with a herd of geldings or other stallion with no mares close by. This has been proven with blood tests. Testosterone levels drop within days of putting them in an all male herd. This is how big ranches get by with running all of their stallions together in the winter with no problems.

    Even then, it is not fool-proof. No one should attempt doing this unless they are very experienced and have a really good reason for doing so. But, as a side-bar, it is interesting that hormone levels drop so drastically when they are run together.
         

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