Stallion debate, not the original - The Horse Forum
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 03-25-2010, 12:55 PM Thread Starter
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Stallion debate, not the original

So I have a colt whom I will geld. He is a yearling right now. I've been waiting for him to drop, going to talk to the vet. Id rather have surgery now then wait too long and risk him being studly forever. Which brings me to this question...


In your opinion can you train the most of studlyness out of a colt/stallion?

Or should you expect some bad behavior even with a well trained fully intact male horse?
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post #2 of 6 Old 03-25-2010, 02:54 PM
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When he is being handled you can have total control over him but when you are not around then his testicals can take over. This is not likely to happen if you have him gelded before he breeds any mares. Alot of stallion sexual behavior is learned while breeding. The snorting and squeeling and striking are part of the mating process and a young stallion has to learn that. He learns rather quickly due to a great incentive but he does have to learn it. If he is a stallion until he is 3 years old it won't make much difference if he is well handled and not bred. If he is going to drop he should have dropped by now so it may be time to consult with a vet about surgery.

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post #3 of 6 Old 03-25-2010, 04:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pieinthesky View Post
In your opinion can you train the most of studlyness out of a colt/stallion?

Or should you expect some bad behavior even with a well trained fully intact male horse?
The best rider/trainer will be happy controlling 90% of the stallion's focus for always 10% will be elsewhere.

If the stud has a good temperment right from the start then it is quite easy with rules set down and never allowed to cross.

Most bad behaviour I found in stallions (assuming they had a decent temperment to start with) is due to a trainer/rider/owner being inconsistant.
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post #4 of 6 Old 03-25-2010, 04:54 PM
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^ what she said

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post #5 of 6 Old 03-25-2010, 10:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post
The best rider/trainer will be happy controlling 90% of the stallion's focus for always 10% will be elsewhere.

If the stud has a good temperment right from the start then it is quite easy with rules set down and never allowed to cross.

Most bad behaviour I found in stallions (assuming they had a decent temperment to start with) is due to a trainer/rider/owner being inconsistant.

this is very true, i campaigned a stallion for almost 2 years. i took him on straight from the breakers at 3.5years old. a stallion is only as good as its handler/rider. ive had him in line up standing right next to other stallions and mares with out a single issue. they have to know right from the start what is acceptable and what is not, and you have to be consistent.

he should have dropped by now, so would be worth bringing this up with your vet.
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post #6 of 6 Old 03-25-2010, 11:04 PM
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I agree with most everyone here. Consistant training and handling, being clear with him what's acceptable and what's not right from the get go will help his mind in the right place.
Trained and handled horses behave well most of the time; untrained and unhandled horses misbehave most of the time.
Anything with a thinking brain will sometimes have their ******ed brain fart moments, be it gelding, mare, stallion, or human.

As a yearling, he should have dropped by now, for sure. I really hope you don't have a bi-lateral crypt on your hands. Not that it's horrible per say, but in order to get his nuts out the vet will have to go inside both of his flanks in order to get to them.
The barn I'm working out of right now bought a really nice Shining Spark colt for an inane amount of money, turns out he's a bi-later crypt (meaning neither of his nuts dropped). He's going to be six this year, I believe. They have not opted to geld him, and he's shown absolutely no signs of being studdy at all. In fact, quite the opposite. He's known as the "gay horse" around here. Poor dude. Super nice to ride, though! I'm hoping to get him out to a few reining shows this summer.
Your vet will be the best one to discuss options for this should that be the case.

Quote:
a stallion is only as good as its handler/rider.
I agree with this 95%. I've seen some really nice minded stallions owed by some the biggest igits out there and still behave themselves nicely. But you're right, though.
No training = no horse. To an extent, of course.

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