Standing on a horses back....why? - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Standing on a horses back....why?

This is a discussion on Standing on a horses back....why? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Standing on horses 2
  • Is standing on a horse;s back bad for its back

Like Tree2Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    09-19-2011, 11:34 PM
  #11
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piper182    
I have to respond to TooSexy for this. Your horse seems to trust you fine. But from what you said in the post, he is trying to teach you lessons when he dumps you. He's not trying to hurt you, only trying to help. Have you thought about thanking him. It sounds silly, but I've found it works...
This is very correct!!! I am the only person who rides him. When something is wrong or not the most comfortable way to do something he bucks. And I'm talking full out bronco bucking don't stop till your in the dirt. However, he will come stand beside you (even out on trails) after he throws you. He lowers head, you grab his bridle and he picks you up. I was trying to teach myself to rock with his canter so I took my feet out of the stirrups, he came to a dead halt. He will not even walk with your feet out ofnthe stirrups. Bareback, oh he's a charm! You start loosing your balance and he stops. He don't keep cantering or trotting. I call him a blessing in disguise. He will teach you right and wrongs. He has his quirks, issues but I have learned how to deal with them. He is by no means a horse I could ever sell. I do want to try him English and work him on jumps because I can no longer take him out trail riding. He still needs a job. On the ground he is perfect gentleman, except you cannot tie him. He is a dream to lunge. He works only off voice commands. He is a gentle giant. I actually had a bad accident on him a few months ago and had to put him back on stall rest. This is the fourth time in two years he has been on stall rest. So, I am resorting back to just riding around the property and doing small jumps or barrels with him. He used to be the best trail horse around but he has genetics working against him big time.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    09-19-2011, 11:43 PM
  #12
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by toosexy4myspotz    
This is very correct!!! I am the only person who rides him. When something is wrong or not the most comfortable way to do something he bucks. And I'm talking full out bronco bucking don't stop till your in the dirt. However, he will come stand beside you (even out on trails) after he throws you. He lowers head, you grab his bridle and he picks you up. I was trying to teach myself to rock with his canter so I took my feet out of the stirrups, he came to a dead halt. He will not even walk with your feet out ofnthe stirrups. Bareback, oh he's a charm! You start loosing your balance and he stops. He don't keep cantering or trotting. I call him a blessing in disguise. He will teach you right and wrongs. He has his quirks, issues but I have learned how to deal with them. He is by no means a horse I could ever sell. I do want to try him English and work him on jumps because I can no longer take him out trail riding. He still needs a job. On the ground he is perfect gentleman, except you cannot tie him. He is a dream to lunge. He works only off voice commands. He is a gentle giant. I actually had a bad accident on him a few months ago and had to put him back on stall rest. This is the fourth time in two years he has been on stall rest. So, I am resorting back to just riding around the property and doing small jumps or barrels with him. He used to be the best trail horse around but he has genetics working against him big time.
how do you mean he had accidents? What is he doing to get hurt? Also, why can't he be tied? Does he freak on one tie or two? Sometimes the confinement of two ties makes a horse nervous, but if you tie him to a wall in his stall and allow him to find his boundaries (slip knots for humans of course) can help teach him to tie without having him hurt himself or break him of his "spirit" so to speak.

When I train I want horses to learn themselves, not me teach. I only help understand.
     
    09-20-2011, 12:11 AM
  #13
Yearling
This is long and hard to explain but I will try my best. The last accident we went out trail riding. Down a normal trail, meanwhile ( he absolutely loves to jump) so he is jumping every single log even if it is only a foot high. We went around the lake and were coming home and we had to cut threw the woods and it's a pretty steep incline. My hubby went first but all of a sudden poco stops. I asked him to walk on thinking he was just being stubborn, which is typical for him, as soon as I asked him forward he went and then he just started backing quickly. I egged him forward, he went then came to an abrupt stop backed like he just ran into fire, I jumped off, knowing the consequences to his behavoir and being on the side of mountain, he backed over a five or six hundred pound boulder. And what do you know, the boulder came loose, it slammed into his front legs, he got them out, then his back legs, he got them out. He walked up to me and stood beside me and I checked him out. Not major just small cuts and scraps. Come to realize he went to step over a small tree and couldn't get his foot over it the tree just lifted up with it. So therefore I think he felt stuck. But when he feels trapped he flips out. I have been through six trainers and fifteen local horseman on this problem. Same issue with tying. He freaks out. I'm not just talking about pulling back. Whatever he is tyed to, he will get loose. You can tie him in a stall horse trailer fine. You can cross tie him or single tie him and slip knots don't work with him. He put way too much pressure to pull it undone. I have seen him flip over backwards several times. I have seen him jump over hitching posts, he has pulled numberous fence posts and hitching posts out of the ground. He has pulled bars out of trailer, I have seen him injure both himself and people that have tried to work with him. Everybody you will ever talk to that has worked with him will tell you you will not walk away from him without injuries. When he freaks out all you can do it back off. If you try to help him you are going to end up seriously injured. I have managed to work my way around these issues for years. I have had him for eight years and will never let him go. He has a lot of skeletons in his closet and was severly injured multiple times before I bought him. He is 92% foundation bred. He has awesome bloodlines on his dams side, she was a ah. However, on his sired side is all screwed up. His sire, three half brothers, and two half sister were euthanized before they were fourteen years old because they were down right dangerous, as I was told. I has seen the video tapes of his sire. His sire was owned by a good friend. His sire was at a young age even temperament, well natured, etc. But over the years he started getting more and more aggressive, and would freak out over everything, they got to where you couldn't even walk out in the pasture with him without him charging. One of his half brothers was euthenized last year. He was a beauty. But every time you got close to him he tried his best to bite, kick, srtike, anything. It's sad. Especially knowing my beloved pal has such screwed up breeding.
     
    09-20-2011, 12:17 AM
  #14
Yearling
I know my spoiling him probably doesn't help any but I would give the world to him on a silver platter if I could. I have a six month old baby now. I haven't been riding him much because I don't want to get hurt. However we are buying our fist house and there is plenty of room to set up some jumps. Now, I just got to learn how to keep my butt in an English saddle cause I have never even sat in one
     
    09-20-2011, 02:21 AM
  #15
Yearling
Spoiling a horse is never the answer to anything.

Never.

If he doesn't like tying, then don't tie him. Just train him to stand still and comfortably while tacking up, if you truly think it a big issue. And if you need someone to hold him, then by golly, get someoen to hold him.

The reason why those horses got so 'dangerous' was because those people never knew the signs, and never thought twice about correcting them, or even training it out of them.

Horses are never bad animals. They may have bad tendencies, but they only become bad if the owner previously had treated them as such. Now, if the sire had such bad temperament, why did they bother breeding him in the first place? There is more to a horse than simply good looks and ability to do things.
     
    09-20-2011, 09:43 AM
  #16
Foal
Standing on a horse is just like any other skill or trust issue. It doesn't mean it covers the complete horse. There are a lot of people who can walk around on their horse and can't canter. So, it's good if your horse will stand completely still and it does take some courage to get up there. Then, continue on learning, playing, working and do all the other things you want to with your horse.
     
    09-20-2011, 11:56 AM
  #17
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deschutes    
Spoiling a horse is never the answer to anything.

Never.

If he doesn't like tying, then don't tie him. Just train him to stand still and comfortably while tacking up, if you truly think it a big issue. And if you need someone to hold him, then by golly, get someoen to hold him.

The reason why those horses got so 'dangerous' was because those people never knew the signs, and never thought twice about correcting them, or even training it out of them.

Horses are never bad animals. They may have bad tendencies, but they only become bad if the owner previously had treated them as such. Now, if the sire had such bad temperament, why did they bother breeding him in the first
Place? There is more to a horse than simply good looks and ability to do things.

I have had him for eight years. I'm used the tieing thing and don't really care. I can take him out into a field drop his lead, say stand, go back into the house and make me sandwich, come back out and he will still be standing there. He is taught very well. He knows a lot he just has certain circumstances under which he completely freaks out.
     
    09-20-2011, 01:22 PM
  #18
Showing
By a horse allowing someone to stand on his back it proves only that the horse may not have a problem with something that high up moving.
     
    09-20-2011, 04:55 PM
  #19
Weanling
Because it impresses people. Because people think that by standing on a horse, that somehow equates the horse as being super quiet and well broke.

These are my two horses. And I can tell you, the one that I am standing on is certainly not the most super quiet or well broke. She just knows how to stand still.

To be honest, it's more skill on the part of the person. Takes balance!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 137.jpg (63.3 KB, 319 views)
flytobecat likes this.
     
    09-20-2011, 05:01 PM
  #20
Green Broke
I'm learning to stand on my horse while she canters, standing on her back while she was standing was never very exciting... I've seen people do it on horses that were barely trained, especially with a saddle on. While she's cantering..... that's a different story, I've had some falls where I got a good mouthful of arena dirt, lol.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Oh no, my horses poor back! White Foot Horse Health 6 06-27-2010 07:23 AM
Back into Horses shadowanne Meet the Community 5 01-09-2010 05:40 PM
I'm trying to get back to drawing horses... Sixxofdiamonds Horse Artwork 32 09-07-2009 10:43 PM
Horse standing with back legs up under him? hillbillyin Horse Health 11 08-27-2008 03:43 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0