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stumped on lunging.

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        09-20-2009, 06:43 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    The horse I am leasing is doing the same thing. I am not going to lunge her again until her trainer is around.


    Rod... Its easy enough to say all that but when it comes down to doing it, it can become much more complicated.


    .... I have seen horses who would not move forward and when you tap them with a whip, they rear or kick out.

    ...Lucara If you're scared to be around your horse at the trot.... (as I am!) then you know how scarey it can be to try and make an already frustrated horse do something through force.
    I would wait until you can have someone more experienced help you work through the issue as apposed to trying it on your own again and letting the horse win 3,4,5 more times.
         
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        09-20-2009, 07:37 PM
      #12
    Trained
    You know I was going to say the same thing. I had a gelding that "wouldn't" lunge, it finally took someone to go in there and say I'm not asking you now, I'm telling you. He lunged like a dream after that. You really have to claim the top of the tower and don't give up.
         
        09-20-2009, 07:41 PM
      #13
    Trained
    I believe that she is working with a trainer.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cheply    
    The horse I am leasing is doing the same thing. I am not going to lunge her again until her trainer is around.


    Rod... Its easy enough to say all that but when it comes down to doing it, it can become much more complicated.


    .... I have seen horses who would not move forward and when you tap them with a whip, they rear or kick out.

    ...Lucara If you're scared to be around your horse at the trot.... (as I am!) then you know how scarey it can be to try and make an already frustrated horse do something through force.
    I would wait until you can have someone more experienced help you work through the issue as apposed to trying it on your own again and letting the horse win 3,4,5 more times.
         
        09-20-2009, 10:05 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    I am. I'm not scared just uncomfortable with the possibility of her kicking out when she jumps into trot.
    Lol my instructor said she's going to think about a way to get the point across that she HAS to move and she HAS to move away from me.

    We had a few issues while riding but my instructor helped me fix those and she did well in the end. We didn't lunge her today though. All I did was walking and a wee bit of trotting so it wasn't anything that was strenuous.
         
        09-21-2009, 12:14 PM
      #15
    Green Broke
    I was having a few probs with my 2 year old when I first got him. He would actually challenge me. I was nervous at first but I got back in there and made him lunge. I personally never use a lunge line on a halter as it is not good for the horses spine (information/videos on this are on Monty Roberts website Monty Roberts Join Up, Man Who Listens to Horses, Real Horse Whisperer, Books, Biography, Train, Demonstrations, Flag is Up. Try the Monty Roberts Join-up as well. It really does work. It may take a few sessions for join up to occur but you will have a whole new relationship with your horse in all aspects of what you do. It has worked wonders with me and Hunter, he now totally trust me (although he can still be a brat at times typical kid lol)
         
        09-21-2009, 03:28 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    I've said this before and I'll say it again. Lounging is and can be complicated, it SO MUCH more than runnign them in a circle. While I agree with Rod 100% it can be easier said than done. Someone like Rod or myself that have lounged many horse's would be able to come and get the job done, but if your unsure of what/how to ask, then the horse is also going to be unsure.

    I'll give the same advise here as another post today, have as qualified trainer help you.
         
        09-21-2009, 04:19 PM
      #17
    Yearling
    While I agree with Rod, sometimes it takes someone with more experience and confidence to get the job done. However, there are things you can do on the ground on a short lead to help the horse understand what you want. You can lead the horse and ask her to move out in front of you. You can teach her to move her front end away from you (turn on the haunches) and her rear end away (turn on forehand). Once she's good about moving one or the other, then you can start asking her to move sideways away from you. Make sure you keep your body square and you move with a purpose. All of these exercises make her move her feet and get her used to moving away from you. Once she's doing these well then you can start to "circle" her on a lead line, just asking her to move forward in a calm walk kind of like in lunging. Don't make it a big deal, just open your leading hand and pat her on the hip to make her move forward. If she resists then start moving her feet, make "lunging" the easiest thing for her to do. Once she realizes that when she doesn't lunge she has to hustle her feet she will start lunging again. Then you can put her on longer and longer ropes and use your body language to push her out. The same body language that will make her sidepass should push her out onto a larger circle and the body language that you used to move her shoulders should make her slow and if you get behind her hips that should turn her towards you. Make sure both you and her are consistent in your body language telling her what to do and her doing it while leading before you try to add the distance with the lunge line. This will help you develop good body language and it will teach her what you're asking her to do. If you need more exercises or videos as examples I can probably find some for you. Keep us posted and good luck!
         
        09-22-2009, 07:11 PM
      #18
    Rod
    Foal
    Lucara,

    I agree with all those who have said that my advice is easier said than done. I disagree however, with those that have said to have a trainer do it for you. In my experience, your relationship with this horse will not change for the better until you can get the horse to do it for you. Don't get me wrong, a trainer has value, especially in teaching you safety and how to work with the horse. But you need to do it. If your trainer/instructor can't teach you to lunge this horse- Well, I'll reserve comment except to say there are good trainers out there that can help you.

    I hope you noticed I said, "get the horse to do it for you". I think there is a real difference between having the confidence, assertiveness and self-esteem to get the horse to do it for you and being aggressive and forcing the horse to do it. Both will change your relationship with the horse, but only one will improve it.
    Unfortunately I have a hard time explaining the difference between the two.

    I worked for two years as a horsemanship instructor at a residential treatment/detention facility for troubled youth, then over 7 years as the horse program manager. I taught over 450 kids to ride and work with horses. Whenever a kid was having trouble with a horse and I would tell them to get more assertive they would often think I meant to get aggressive and/or mean. That is not it at all. But when the kid would develop the mindset of "it will happen and I can do it" often the problem would be over before he/she crawled back into the pen with the horse.

    I used to think that a horse could smell fear, or for that matter confidence. I don't totally discount that idea, but I now think that a horse is so sensitive to non-verbal communication that he can tell when you are serious about something. I think posture, how you hold equipment, how you move, speed of movement, facial expression and even the diameter of your eye (among many other things) tells the horse if you can accomplish a goal.

    I have been pretty **** nervous in a round pen with a certain few horses. If they totally worked on the smell of fear, I would have been toast. But I have habits, experience and confidence that got me through it and I accomplished what I needed to. I guess I am telling you that you can "fake it".

    When the kids would say they didn't have the confidence to do something I'd tell them to pretend they did until they developed it.

    This is not just a 'cowboy up' talk. I think when people are encouraged to cowboy up, they are often being invited to do something stupid. Be smart! Be safe! Be confident! Develop an attitude! Learn what you need to do. I believe you can. Keep us posted.

    Rod
         
        09-22-2009, 07:27 PM
      #19
    Yearling
    While I agree with you 100% Rod that she needs to ultimately be the one to do it,it seems to me that maybe the horse was never taught how to lunge properly. In that case she does not have the skill set to TEACH the horse to lunge. That needs to be done by someone who can give the horse the basics and then she can come in and reassert her leadership and strengthen the bond.

    The blind leading the blind is never a good idea...kind of like green and green equals black and blue. However, if you give her actual exercises to try then maybe something will click for them. Telling her to be confident but then not telling her how to accomplish it is not going to help her.

    To the original poster, I suggest doing some online research on body language, posture and non-verbal signals. There are many good articles and videos and pictures out there. Use them to see what we are talking about since it's hard to fully describe without showing you. Also, it wouldn't hurt to ask around for a good groundwork trainer that specializes in things like this and take lessons from them on how to effectively use your body to talk your horse.
         
        09-25-2009, 02:51 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    There is one very simple piece of body language that can often cause this problem: Your shoulders. Let's say that you are trying to lunge your horse clockwise. You are holding the lunge line in your right hand, and the lunge whip in your left hand. If you then pull your right shoulder back, that may be all the encouragement your mare needs to go forwards. I haven't ever really understood completely why this is, but your shoulder acts almost as a gate to the horse - when your shoulder is closed, it is a clear sign to them that they should stop. When it is open, it invites them forward. It is odd, but I have had it work for me in the past. Hope that helps. :)
         

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