Taking off after jumping
   

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Taking off after jumping

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  • Bolting after last jump
  • Horse bolts away from jump

 
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    11-01-2007, 08:10 PM
  #1
Foal
Taking off after jumping

My horse Beau has a problem with bolting after jumping.

He'll do the course perectly but after the last jump he gets really excited and taken off into a gallop and bucks.

I can get him under control as quick as I can but I can never prevent him from doing it even though I am ready for it.

Any advice on how to get him to relax?

(I have tried mixing up the courses so he doesn't know what the last jump is but he always seems to know, even if I coninue going around; he always seems to know that we're done with the course)
     
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    11-01-2007, 08:20 PM
  #2
Yearling
Not sure what you can do to stop him bolting but thinking good thoughts could help and staying calm............


No i'm not a hippie
     
    11-01-2007, 08:54 PM
  #3
Weanling
Hey... what kind of bit do you use? I know some excercises that you could do if your interested??
I have had bolters, they arn't nice. Espicually when they put there head to their chest and just run, the more you try and get there head up the faster they go.

Another thing, does he just bolt when he jumps? Or is it a constant thing? For example does he bolts when going for a Trail Ride?
     
    11-01-2007, 09:51 PM
  #4
Started
Here is a quick article that may give you some insight :)

Bolting

People think horses are running off with them when in fact they are trying to run away from them, they just can’t figure out how that human up there is keeping up with them! Horses do not run off when they are calm, trusting and comfortable with the rider, they do it out of fear and confusion. It’s true that some horses (right brain horses, for example) are more prone to this than others, while some are more prone to buck or stop. It’s very much a Horsenality-specific tendency but it is absolutely fear-based. For this reason, the cure must begin on the ground. There is no bit in the world that can control a horse’s emotions except a bit of savvy. You need more knowledge, not bigger contraptions in your horse’s mouth.

Earning a horse’s trust is not a hard thing to do, in and of itself, but it is often hard for people to take the time to earn trust because they basically just want to hurry up and ride.

There are specific things people can do to help a horse relax. First of all, they involve working on the relationship. Secondly, you need to know how to play with the horse on the ground so you have a mutual understanding, responses instead of reactions, and a horse that looks to you as a leader, rather than a threat to his safety. The preparations on the ground are an important warm up to get the horse in the right frame of mind to be ridden. As we like to say, “when put through his paces the horse has got to look and feel ridable before you get on!” Once you’re on, there are specific exercises that are calming for the horse.

If you make it a priority to have your horse calm and confident, you’ll solve all those impulsive problems... naturally.
     
    11-01-2007, 11:23 PM
  #5
Weanling
And that means???
     
    11-01-2007, 11:35 PM
  #6
Showing
Hmm, that is a toughie. I recommend not doing a course in full; take a jump, drop to a trot or walk, do a circle, come back to the jump, move on to the next one, drop down to a trot/walk, circle.. etc.. you get the picture. It takes a lot of time and patience, but it might work. Praise him when he comes down to the slower gait without resisting.
Another thing you can do is: go over the jump, stop, turn around (on the haunches or forehand, make him work, don't just turn) and head back over the jump, stop, turn, jump, stop, turn, jump, until he understands that he needs to be calm about it. Praise him when he stops calmly.
And of course, if your horse bucks, pull his nose around to his girth when you feel him hunch up - that position is neutral, and the horse can do nothing but turn around into your hand.
Let me know if any of these sound like they'd work - if not, then I'll dust off my brain some more...
     
    11-01-2007, 11:38 PM
  #7
Weanling
:roll: That makes sense
     
    11-02-2007, 09:36 AM
  #8
Started
Sweetypie16--

What you failed to understand from the article was that the horse may be unconfident and trying to run away from the rider. Like the article said, calm, trusting horses do not bolt. So it's a matter of the rider building confidence in the horse while jumping.
     
    11-02-2007, 03:19 PM
  #9
Yearling
Spirit horse, although that article makes sense, and I agree thoroughly with a lot of what the articles you have been posting says, I don't know if it is always the 100% explanation for any horse.

My gelding is very calm, relaxed, and confident in his rider (the girl who has been leasing him for the last couple of years) - this is apparent in all of their interactions together.

But, when he gets on a great open trail, when other horses are cantering, or hasn't been out in a bit, when she askes for a nice canter, he would go into a full on run is she let him. She corrects him a few times by breaking him down into a small circle, and then he is usually fine. She jokes that he is a race horse stuck in his body - that horse just loves to run. To me it seems only natural that a horse would love to run sometimes.

She definitely never increased the strength of her bit though! She worked on her skills, and ability to teach him when it is appropriate to run and when to be calm (lots of small circles with one rein on rides). Now she rides in a plain loose ring snaffle or a rope halter.
     
    11-02-2007, 05:20 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
Hmm, that is a toughie. I recommend not doing a course in full; take a jump, drop to a trot or walk, do a circle, come back to the jump, move on to the next one, drop down to a trot/walk, circle.. etc.. you get the picture. It takes a lot of time and patience, but it might work. Praise him when he comes down to the slower gait without resisting.
Another thing you can do is: go over the jump, stop, turn around (on the haunches or forehand, make him work, don't just turn) and head back over the jump, stop, turn, jump, stop, turn, jump, until he understands that he needs to be calm about it. Praise him when he stops calmly.
And of course, if your horse bucks, pull his nose around to his girth when you feel him hunch up - that position is neutral, and the horse can do nothing but turn around into your hand.
Let me know if any of these sound like they'd work - if not, then I'll dust off my brain some more...
I agree. I'm not remember where I heard it, but what you explained was very similar to what a top trainer suggested.
     

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